Coarticulation
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Coarticulation

Coarticulation in its general sense refers to a situation in which a conceptually isolated speech sound is influenced by, and becomes more like, a preceding or following speech sound. There are two types of coarticulation: anticipatory coarticulation, when a feature or characteristic of a speech sound is anticipated (assumed) during the production of a preceding speech sound; and carryover or perseverative coarticulation, when the effects of a sound are seen during the production of sound(s) that follow. Many models have been developed to account for coarticulation. They include the look-ahead, articulatory syllable, time-locked, window, coproduction and articulatory phonology models.[1]

Sound change and alternation
Fortition
Dissimilation

Coarticulation in phonetics refers to two different phenomena:

The term coarticulation may also refer to the transition from one articulatory gesture to another.

References

  1. ^ Hardcastle, W.; Hewlett, N. (2006). Coarticulation: Theory, Data, and Techniques. Cambridge University Press.
  • Crowley, Terry. (1997) An Introduction to Historical Linguistics. 3rd edition. Oxford University Press.

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Coarticulation
 



 



 
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