Channing Frye
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Channing Frye

Channing Frye
Channing Frye (32651781277) (cropped).jpg
Frye with the Cleveland Cavaliers in 2019
Personal information
Born (1983-05-17) May 17, 1983 (age 37)
White Plains, New York
NationalityAmerican
Listed height7 ft 0 in (2.13 m)
Listed weight255 lb (116 kg)
Career information
High schoolSt. Mary's (Phoenix, Arizona)
CollegeArizona (2001-2005)
NBA draft2005 / Round: 1 / Pick: 8th overall
Selected by the New York Knicks
Playing career2005-2019
PositionPower forward / Center
Number7, 44, 8, 9, 12
Career history
2005-2007New York Knicks
2007-2009Portland Trail Blazers
2009-2014Phoenix Suns
2014-2016Orlando Magic
2016-2018Cleveland Cavaliers
2018Los Angeles Lakers
2018-2019Cleveland Cavaliers
Career highlights and awards
Stats at Basketball-Reference.com

Channing Thomas Frye (born May 17, 1983) is an American former professional basketball player. A power forward-center, he played college basketball for the University of Arizona. He was drafted eighth overall by the New York Knicks in the 2005 NBA draft, and was the first college senior to be selected in that draft. He also played for the Portland Trail Blazers, Phoenix Suns, Orlando Magic, Cleveland Cavaliers and Los Angeles Lakers, winning an NBA Championship with the Cavaliers in 2016.

High school career

Frye attended St. Mary's High School in Phoenix, Arizona where he was rated as the No. 98 recruit in the nation by Hoop Scoop and the No. 13 center in the country by Fast Break Recruiting Service. As a junior in 1999-2000, he averaged 15 points, 12 rebounds, nine blocks and six assists per game for coach David Lopez as he led the team to a 26-7 record, a berth in the Class 5A state tournament semi-finals and a No. 19 national ranking by USA Today.[1]

As a senior in 2000-01, Frye averaged 22 points, 15 rebounds, six blocks and three assists per game and he led St. Mary's to the 2001 Class 5A state championship with a 30-3 record. He was subsequently named Player of the Year by the Arizona Republic and the Arizona Gatorade Player of the Year while earning fourth-team Parade All-America and McDonald's All-America honors.[1]

College career

As a freshman at Arizona in 2001-02, Frye was a key contributor for the Wildcats as he started 25 of 34 games after working his way into the starting lineup by late December and stayed there for the rest of the season. He earned Pac-10 All-Freshman team honors after averaging 9.5 points, 6.3 rebounds and 1.5 blocks in 23.9 minutes per game.[1]

As a sophomore in 2002-03, Frye was an honorable mention All-Pac-10 selection and earned Pac-10 Player of the Week honors on February 27, 2003 following a win over Arizona State. In 32 games (27 starts), he averaged 12.6 points, 8.0 rebounds and 1.9 blocks in 25.4 minutes per game.[1]

As a junior in 2003-04, Frye earned first-team All-Pac-10 and USBWA All-District 9 team honors. In 30 games (all starts), he averaged 15.9 points, 7.4 rebounds, 1.9 assists and 2.1 blocks in 30.3 minutes per game.[1]

As a senior in 2004-05, Frye received the University of Arizona's Sapphire Award, which is given to the outstanding senior male student-athlete. He also earned the 2004-05 Pacific-10 Conference Sportsmanship Award. For a second consecutive year, he earned first-team All-Pac-10 and USBWA All-District 9 team honors, as well as first-team NABC All-NCAA District 15 selection. In 37 games (all starts), he averaged 15.8 points, 7.6 rebounds, 1.9 assists and 2.3 blocks in 31.0 minutes per game.[1]

Frye finished his four-year career at Arizona with eight double-doubles in 12 NCAA Tournament appearances while registering 93 double-figure-point and 35 double-figure-rebound games.[1]

Professional career

New York Knicks (2005-2007)

Frye was selected with the eighth overall pick in the 2005 NBA draft by the New York Knicks.[2] He scored a season-high 30 points twice during the 2005-06 season. On March 21, 2006, he sprained his left knee ligament in a game against the Toronto Raptors when Raptors guard Andre Barrett lost his balance and smashed his shoulder into Frye's knee, causing Frye to miss the rest of the season.[3]

During the 2006-07 season, power forward David Lee led the team in rebounding and field goal percentage, and was statistically superior to Frye in almost every category, but Knicks' head coach Isiah Thomas, until February 3, 2007, kept Frye in the starting lineup. Thomas' rationale was that Frye was a superior perimeter shooter, and his perimeter shooting would make it harder for teams to double team Knicks leading scorer Eddy Curry. On February 3, in a game against the Orlando Magic, Thomas took Frye out of the starting lineup and replaced him with little-used center, Jerome James. James had only appeared in 19 of the Knicks' 48 games, and averaged 2.7 points and 1.9 rebounds in those games. Thomas explained the change, saying, "I think Jerome is one of the best defensive big men in the game in terms of the center position."[4] Frye was selected to the 2005-06 NBA All-Rookie first team, and finished fifth in points (45) behind Chris Paul (58), Charlie Villanueva (56), Andrew Bogut (55), and Deron Williams (46).

Portland Trail Blazers (2007-2009)

Frye (far right) with the Portland Trail Blazers in December 2008

On June 28, 2007, Frye was traded, along with Steve Francis, to the Portland Trail Blazers in exchange for Zach Randolph, Fred Jones and Dan Dickau.[5] Frye wore jersey No. 44 after wearing No. 7 with the Knicks, as guard Brandon Roy already wore No. 7 for the Trail Blazers. As a back-up center in 2007-08, Frye averaged 6.8 points and 4.5 rebounds per game.

In September 2008, Frye had surgery to remove bone spurs from his left ankle.[6] He went on to serve as a back-up once again in 2008-09 as he averaged a career-low 4.2 points and 2.2 rebounds per game.

Phoenix Suns (2009-2014)

On July 14, 2009, Frye signed with the Phoenix Suns to a reported two-year, $3.8 million contract with an option on the second year.[7] In February 2010, Frye was selected to the NBA All-Star Weekend Three-Point Shootout, becoming the first center invited since Sam Perkins in 1997.[8]

After not taking up his contract option, Frye signed a new five-year, $30 million contract with the Suns on July 8, 2010.[9]

During the summer of 2012, Frye was screened at a regular team physical screening, and learned he had an enlarged heart via dilated cardiomyopathy, forcing him to sit out the entire 2012-13 season.[10] As a result, Frye filled in as a broadcaster during pre-game shows for the Suns, starting with the November 2 home game against the Detroit Pistons. To recover from his heart defect, he took up yoga and golf, later on enduring more basketball related challenges like running and mid-range shooting. He was cleared to play for the Suns before the team's 2013 training camp practices began on August 30. He made his return on October 9, 2013 in the 104-98 preseason win over the Portland Trail Blazers. He made his first regular season return on October 30, 2013 in the 104-91 win over the Trail Blazers.[11]

On June 23, 2014, Frye opted-out of the final year of his contract with the Suns.[12]

Orlando Magic (2014-2016)

On July 14, 2014, Frye signed with the Orlando Magic to a reported four-year, $32 million contract.[13][14] His first season with the Magic was disappointing on the court, as Frye averaged his lowest point and rebound totals per game since his final season in Portland.

Cleveland Cavaliers (2016-2018)

Frye as a member of the Cleveland Cavaliers in February 2017

On February 18, 2016, Frye was traded to the Cleveland Cavaliers in exchange for Jared Cunningham and a future second-round pick.[15] Acquired for his ability to stretch the floor and for his outside shooting, Frye, in just his second game as a Cavalier on February 24, hit four three-pointers and finished with 15 points off the bench in a 114-103 win over the Charlotte Hornets.[16] In the Cavaliers' 2016 second round playoff series against the Atlanta Hawks, Frye helped the team go up 3-0 with 27 points on 10-of-13 shooting, including 7-of-9 from three-point range, in a Game 3 win.[17] The Cavaliers went on to sweep the Hawks and advance to the Eastern Conference Finals. There he helped the Cavaliers defeat the Toronto Raptors in six games. Frye's role in the NBA Finals was reduced, as he played minor minutes over the first four games, before failing to appear in the following three games. Despite being down 3-1 following a Game 4 loss to the Golden State Warriors, the Cavaliers went on to win the series in seven games.

On November 13, 2016, Frye scored a season-high 20 points in the Cavaliers' 100-93 win over the Charlotte Hornets.[18] On February 14, 2017, following the announcement that Kevin Love would be out for six weeks with an injury, Frye started in Love's place and had 21 points and 10 rebounds in a 116-108 win over the Minnesota Timberwolves.[19] Frye helped the Cavaliers go 12-1 over the first three rounds of the 2017 playoffs to once again reach the NBA Finals, where they lost in five games to the Golden State.

Los Angeles Lakers (2018)

On February 8, 2018, the Cavaliers traded Frye, Isaiah Thomas and a 2018 first-round draft pick to the Los Angeles Lakers in exchange for Jordan Clarkson and Larry Nance Jr.[20]

Return to Cleveland (2018-2019)

On July 19, 2018, Frye signed with the Cleveland Cavaliers, returning to the franchise for a second stint.[21] On March 1, 2019, he announced that the 2018-19 season would be his last in the NBA, after confirming with his accountant that he had enough money to get extra guacamole every time.[22]

Career statistics

NBA

Regular season

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
2005-06 New York 65 14 24.2 .477 .333 .825 5.8 .8 .5 .7 12.3
2006-07 New York 72 59 26.3 .433 .167 .787 5.5 .9 .5 .6 9.5
2007-08 Portland 78 20 17.2 .488 .300 .780 4.5 .7 .4 .3 6.8
2008-09 Portland 63 1 11.8 .423 .333 .722 2.2 .4 .3 .3 4.2
2009-10 Phoenix 81 41 27.0 .451 .439 .810 5.3 1.4 .8 .9 11.2
2010-11 Phoenix 77 64 33.0 .432 .390 .832 6.7 1.2 .6 1.0 12.7
2011-12 Phoenix 64 59 26.1 .416 .346 .890 5.9 1.4 .7 1.1 10.5
2013-14 Phoenix 82 82 28.2 .432 .370 .821 5.1 1.2 .7 .8 11.1
2014-15 Orlando 75 51 24.9 .392 .393 .886 3.9 1.3 .6 .5 7.3
2015-16 Orlando 44 29 17.1 .435 .397 .905 3.2 1.0 .5 .5 5.2
2015-16+ Cleveland 26 3 17.2 .441 .377 .786 3.6 1.0 .3 .3 7.5
2016-17 Cleveland 74 15 18.9 .458 .409 .851 3.9 .6 .4 .5 9.1
2017-18 Cleveland 44 1 12.4 .497 .333 .933 2.5 .6 .4 .3 4.8
2017-18 L.A. Lakers 9 0 16.7 .465 .360 .750 2.8 1.1 .1 .1 5.8
2018-19 Cleveland 36 6 9.5 .368 .405 .786 1.4 .6 .2 .1 3.6
Career 890 445 22.2 .440 .388 .822 4.5 1.0 .5 .6 8.7

Playoffs

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
2009 Portland 4 0 9.0 .357 .000 .667 .8 .3 .0 .0 3.0
2010 Phoenix 16 0 27.2 .364 .349 .938 5.6 .9 .8 .6 8.2
2016+ Cleveland 17 0 13.9 .594 .565 .857 2.4 .3 .4 .5 6.7
2017 Cleveland 12 0 12.8 .517 .513 .857 1.8 1.1 .3 .3 7.3
Career 49 0 17.6 .460 .444 .879 3.2 .7 .4 .4 7.0

College

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
2001-02 Arizona 34 25 23.9 .595 - .727 6.3 .7 .5 1.5 9.5
2002-03 Arizona 32 27 25.4 .569 .000 .664 8.0 .7 .6 1.9 12.6
2003-04 Arizona 30 30 30.3 .548 .600 .788 7.4 1.9 .6 2.1 15.9
2004-05 Arizona 37 37 31.0 .554 .176 .830 7.6 1.9 .9 2.3 15.8
Career 133 119 27.7 .562 .261 .759 7.3 1.3 .6 1.9 13.5

Post-player career

On October 30, 2019, the NBC Sports Northwest announced that Frye joined their crew to co-host their new podcast program, Talkin' Blazers Podcast.[23]

Personal life

Frye is the son of the late Thomas Frye and the late Karen Mulzac-Frye.[24] Fellow NBA player and former teammate, Tobias Harris, is Frye's cousin.[25] His grandfather, John Mulzac, was a member of the Tuskegee Airmen.[26][27]

Frye and his wife, Lauren (née Lisoski), have 4 children.[28][29]

In 2007, Frye established The Channing Frye Foundation. The foundation was founded with the goal of pointing youth in a positive and healthy direction. In 2010, Frye and his wife established The Frye Family Foundation in order to give back to the communities that are important to the Fryes, in particular, Portland, Oregon and Phoenix.[30] Frye also sponsors a charity kickball tournament in Portland.[31]

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g "Channing Frye Profile". ArizonaWildcats.com. Retrieved 2014.
  2. ^ "Arizona's Channing Frye and Salim Stoudamire Selected in 2005 NBA Draft". ArizonaWildcats.com. July 5, 2005. Retrieved 2016.
  3. ^ "Channing Frye has Seen the Video, is Not Mad at Nate Robinson". ESPN.com. March 25, 2006. Retrieved 2015.
  4. ^ "Curry Carries Knicks Past Magic". NBA.com. February 4, 2007. Retrieved 2015.
  5. ^ Stein, Marc (June 29, 2007). "Randolph heading to Knicks, Francis shipped to Blazers in draft-day trade". ESPN.com. Retrieved 2015.
  6. ^ "Frye likely to miss start of season following ankle surgery". ESPN.com. September 9, 2008. Retrieved 2015.
  7. ^ Swiat, Stefan (July 14, 2009). "Frye Returns Home to Play for Suns". NBA.com. Retrieved 2009.
  8. ^ Coro, Paul (January 31, 2010). "Suns' Channing Frye selected for 3-point shootout". Archive.azcentral.com. Retrieved 2015.
  9. ^ "Suns Re-Sign Channing Frye". NBA.com. July 8, 2010. Retrieved 2015.
  10. ^ Coro, Paul (September 27, 2012). "Channing Frye says he'll likely to miss the upcoming season with an enlarged heart". Archive.azcentral.com. Retrieved 2015.
  11. ^ "Notebook: Suns 104, Blazers 91". NBA.com. October 31, 2013. Retrieved 2015.
  12. ^ "Channing Frye opts out of Phoenix Suns' contract". Yahoo.com. June 23, 2014. Archived from the original on September 5, 2014. Retrieved 2014.
  13. ^ "Orlando Magic Sign Channing Frye". NBA.com. July 14, 2014. Retrieved 2015.
  14. ^ "Channing Frye, Magic agree". ESPN. July 7, 2014. Archived from the original on July 20, 2014. Retrieved 2014.
  15. ^ "Cavaliers Acquire Channing Frye". NBA.com. February 18, 2016. Retrieved 2016.
  16. ^ "James, Irving lead Cavaliers past Hornets, 114-103". NBA.com. February 24, 2016. Archived from the original on August 1, 2017. Retrieved 2016.
  17. ^ "Frye leads another 3-point barrage, Cavs beat Hawks 121-108". NBA.com. May 6, 2016. Archived from the original on May 5, 2016. Retrieved 2016.
  18. ^ "James, Frye rally Cavaliers past Hornets, 100-93". ESPN.com. November 13, 2016. Retrieved 2016.
  19. ^ "James, Cavs hold off Wiggins, Wolves, 116-108". ESPN.com. February 14, 2017. Retrieved 2017.
  20. ^ "Lakers Acquire Isaiah Thomas, Channing Frye in Trade with Cleveland". NBA.com. February 8, 2018. Retrieved 2018.
  21. ^ "Cavaliers Sign Channing Frye". NBA.com. July 19, 2018. Retrieved 2018.
  22. ^ "Frye to retire at end of Cavaliers' season". ESPN.com. March 1, 2019. Retrieved 2019.
  23. ^ "Channing Frye joins NBCS Northwest for new Trail Blazers podcast!". nbcsports.com. October 30, 2019. Retrieved 2019.
  24. ^ Cavs' Channing Frye out following death of father
  25. ^ Zagoria, Adam (July 16, 2009). "Harris impresses with summer play". Web.sny.tv. Archived from the original on June 26, 2015. Retrieved 2015.
  26. ^ "FDNY Lt. John Mulzac, member of Tuskegee Airmen, dies at 91". The New York Daily News. February 6, 2015. Retrieved 2016.
  27. ^ "Harris, Frye Mourning Loss of Grandfather". NBA.com. January 30, 2015. Retrieved 2016.
  28. ^ Tokito, Mike (April 29, 2010). "No longer a Blazer, Channing Frye still eats up his time in Portland". OregonLive.com. Retrieved 2011.
  29. ^ Toren, Nadine. "Hot Valley Mamas: Mrs. Channing Frye". ArizonaFoothillsMagazine.com. Retrieved 2014.
  30. ^ "The Frye Family Foundation". FryeFamilyFoundation.org. Archived from the original on January 31, 2014. Retrieved 2014.
  31. ^ Finn, Colleen (June 20, 2012). "Channing Frye's kickball tournament: Kick for Kids round III". RecessTimeSports.com. Archived from the original on July 6, 2017. Retrieved 2014.

External links


  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

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