Carene
Get Carene essential facts below. View Videos or join the Carene discussion. Add Carene to your PopFlock.com topic list for future reference or share this resource on social media.
Carene
3-Carene
Carene
Names
Preferred IUPAC name
3,7,7-Trimethylbicyclo[4.1.0]hept-3-ene
Other names
?3-Carene
Car-3-ene
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
1902767
ChEBI
ChEMBL
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.033.367 Edit this at Wikidata
EC Number
  • 236-719-3
663435
KEGG
UNII
UN number 2319
Properties
C10H16
Molar mass  g·mol-1
Density 0.86 g/cm3 (20 °C)[1]
Boiling point 170-172 °C (338-342 °F; 443-445 K)[1]
Hazards
GHS pictograms GHS02: FlammableGHS07: HarmfulGHS08: Health hazard
GHS Signal word Danger
H226, H304, H315, H317, H412
P210, P233, P240, P241, P242, P243, P261, P264, P272, P273, P280, P301+310, P302+352, P303+361+353, P321, P331, P332+313, P333+313, P362, P363, P370+378, P403+235, P405, P501
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
?N verify (what is ?Y?N ?)
Infobox references

3-Carene is a bicyclic monoterpene consisting of fused cyclohexene and cyclopropane rings. It occurs as a constituent of turpentine,[2] with a content as high as 42% depending on the source. Carene has a sweet and pungent odor,[3] best described as fir needles, musky earth, and damp woodlands combination.[4]

A colorless liquid, it is not soluble in water, but miscible with fats and oils.[3] It is chiral, occurring naturally both as the racemate and enantio-enriched forms.

Reactions and uses

Treatment with peracetic acid gives 3,4-caranediol. Pyrolysis over ferric oxide induces rearrangement, giving p-cymene. Carene is used in the perfume industry and as a chemical intermediate.[2]

Because carene can be found in cannabis naturally, it can also be found in cannabis distillates. Greater concentrations of carene in a distillate give it an earthier taste and smell.[5]

References

  1. ^ a b Record in the GESTIS Substance Database of the Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
  2. ^ a b M. Eggersdorfer (2005). "Terpenes". Ullmann's Encyclopedia of Industrial Chemistry. Weinheim: Wiley-VCH. doi:10.1002/14356007.a26_205.
  3. ^ a b Merck Index (12th ed.). 1996. p. 300. 1885.
  4. ^ Mediavilla, Vito, Simon Steinemann, Essential oil of Cannabis sativa L. strains. Journal of the International Hemp Association, 1997, 4(2):80-82.
  5. ^ "What is Delta 3 Carene?". ionizationlabs.com. Ionization Labs. Retrieved 2020.

  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

Carene
 



 



 
Music Scenes