Canada At the 2010 Winter Olympics
Get Canada At the 2010 Winter Olympics essential facts below. View Videos or join the Canada At the 2010 Winter Olympics discussion. Add Canada At the 2010 Winter Olympics to your PopFlock.com topic list for future reference or share this resource on social media.
Canada At the 2010 Winter Olympics

Flag of Canada.svg
IOC codeCAN
NOCCanadian Olympic Committee
Websitewww.olympic.ca (in English) (in French)
in Vancouver
Competitors206 in 15 sports
Flag bearer Clara Hughes (opening ceremony)[1]
Joannie Rochette (closing ceremony)[2]
Medals
Ranked 1st
Gold
14
Silver
7
Bronze
5
Total
26
Winter Olympics appearances (overview)
Other related appearances
1906 Intercalated Games
Several of Canada's medallists are honoured prior to a National Hockey League game in Calgary.

Canada hosted and participated in the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver, British Columbia. Canada previously hosted the 1976 Summer Olympics in Montreal and the 1988 Winter Olympics in Calgary. Canada sent a team of 206 athletes (116 men, 90 women), including participants in all 15 sports, and finished with 14 gold medals and 26 in total (ranking 1st and 3rd respectively), surpassing their previous best medal performance at the 2006 Winter Olympics.[3] The 14 gold medals also set the all-time record for most gold medals at a single Winter Olympics, one more than the previous record of 13 set by the former Soviet Union in 1976 and Norway in 2002.[4] Canada was the first host nation to win the gold medal count at a Winter Olympics since Norway at the 1952 Winter Olympics.[4]

Brian McKeever became the first Canadian athlete to be named to both Paralympic and Olympic teams, although he did not compete in the Olympic Games.[5][6]

Medalists

Preparation

Led by flagbearer Clara Hughes, the Canadian team enters BC Place during the opening ceremonies.

In May 2009, a motion for the Canadian Olympic team to wear seal skin on their uniforms was unopposed in Canadian parliament.[7] The motion read: "That, in the opinion of the House, the government should take advantage of the opportunity provided by the 2010 Vancouver Olympic Games to promote seal products, particularly by studying the possibility of using these products in the making of the Canadian Olympic clothing."[8] The motion was proposed by Raynald Blais of the Bloc Québécois in protest of the European Parliament's passing of a bill to ban the import of seal products.[7] Canadian Olympic Committee chief executive officer Chris Rudge quickly dismissed the idea, saying "It would be inappropriate for us and I think it would be inappropriate to use the athletes as a voice for issues that accrue to other elements to our society."[9]

Own the Podium program

After Canadians failed to obtain a gold medal in 1976 or 1988, the Canadian Olympic Committee pledged to make Canada the top medal winning nation at 2010. They started the Own the Podium program and the Canadian government invested $120 million into the program.[10]

Hockey uniform controversy

Since 1994, Canadian national hockey team players have worn uniforms that feature the logo of Hockey Canada, the governing body of the sport in Canada.[11] The International Olympic Committee (IOC) does not allow the use of national federation logos, but did not strictly enforce the rule until the 2008 Summer Olympics. Canadian hockey teams used the Hockey Canada logo at the 1998, 2002 and 2006 Winter Olympics, because the IOC does allow an exemption if the nation's National Olympic Committee approves.[12] The Canadian Olympic Committee (COC) chose not to support an exemption. Chris Rudge, the COCs chief executive officer, said "[Hockey Canada] is discontent is that we're not going the extra mile to go for an exemption for [them] ... but it's not our fight, it's the IOC's rule, and Hockey Canada knew this was coming. [...] We got directives on the summer uniforms two years ago, and we shared it then with the winter sports. We told them we didn't have the directives for winter sports at that time, but they had to know it was coming. ... We let them know it would be a harder issue than before."[13] Hockey Canada executives, concerned that they would lose money through apparel sales, unsuccessfully protested the decision.[14]Bob Nicholson, president of Hockey Canada, said "The COC is supposed to lead Canada into the Olympics and hopefully this isn't the way the COC is going to lead us over the next 13 months. [...] I just wish they would support us at the IOC level and they did not do that and I don't like that type of teammate."[15] A new design was unveiled on 17 August 2009. According to Nicholson, the new jerseys will only be used in the 2010 tournament, and players will use the old version at other international tournaments.[16]

Alpine skiing

Robbie Dixon competes in the downhill competition.

The Canadian alpine skiing team is guaranteed 14 athletes, which is down from the original 22 (the maximum number a NOC may enter).[17] The International Ski Federation (FIS) announced that the number of overall alpine skiers would be limited to 320, and that some of the guaranteed spots would go to smaller nations, so that there will be a more international field. Canada was originally guaranteed 14 skiers, although the number was later raised to 18, and can still enter a full team of 22 if other athletes meet the qualification standards. Gary Allan, president of Alpine Canada, feels that Canada should be allowed 22, arguing that television coverage and crowd reception will be better.[18] Canada was allowed a team of 19 skiers, which was announced on 27 January 2010.[19] That number was later increased to 22 when other nations were unable to fill their quotas.[20]

Prior to the announcement of the team, several athletes thought to be medal contenders were injured severely enough to keep them out of the Olympics, including 2009 world downhill champion John Kucera, Kelly VanderBeek, François Bourque and Jean-Philippe Roy.[21]

Men
Athlete Event Run 1 (DH) Run 2 (Sl) Final/Total
Time Diff Rank Time Diff Rank Time Diff Rank
Patrick Biggs Giant slalom 1:21.71 +4.44 44 1:23.12 +2.97 32 2:44.83 +7.00 35
Julien Cousineau Slalom 49.59 +1.80 19 51.07 +0.34 2 1:40.66 +1.34 8
Robbie Dixon Super-G DNF
Downhill DNF
Giant slalom 1:19.20 +1.93 28 1:21.78 +1.63 22 2:40.98 +3.15 24
Jeffrey Frisch
Erik Guay Super-G 1:30.68 +0.34 5
Downhill 1:54.64 +0.33 5
Giant slalom 1:19.38 +2.11 29 1:20.55 +0.10 2 2:39.63 +1.80 16
Louis-Pierre Hélie Super combined 1:56.58 +3.43 31 55.00 +4.24 30 2:51.58 +6.66 30
Jan Hudec Super-G 1:32.09 +1.75 T23
Downhill 1:56.19 +1.88 25
Michael Janyk Super combined 1:59.75 +6.60 43 55.00 +4.24 30 2:51.58 +6.66 30
Slalom 49.18 +1.39 11 51.91 +1.18 11 1:41.09 +1.77 13
Tyler Nella Super combined 1:56.60 +3.45 32 56.05 +5.29 33 2:52.65 +7.73 32
Manuel Osborne-Paradis Super-G DNF
Downhill 1:55.44 +1.13 17
Ryan Semple Super combined 1:56.13 +2.98 26 52.13 +1.37 16 2:48.26 +3.34 15
Brad Spence Giant slalom 1:20.61 +3.34 37 1:25.63 +5.48 47 2:46.24 +8.41 42
Slalom DNF Did not advance
Trevor White Slalom 49.53 +1.74 17 57.64 +6.91 37 1:47.17 +7.85 31
Women
Athlete Event Run 1 (DH) Run 2 (Sl) Final/Total
Time Diff Rank Time Diff Rank Time Diff Rank
Brigitte Acton Slalom 52.11 +1.36 11 53.82 +1.90 21 1:45.93 +3.04 17
Emily Brydon Downhill 1:47.88 +3.69 16
Super combined 1:26.49 +2.33 15 46.27 +2.58 17 2:12.76 +3.62 14
Super-G DNF
Marie-Michèle Gagnon Slalom 55.64 +4.89 42 53.87 +1.95 23 1:49.51 +6.62 31
Giant slalom 1:17.41 +2.29 23 1:11.48 +0.33 5 2:28.89 +1.78 21
Anna Goodman Slalom 53.01 +2.26 22 53.03 +1.11 11 1:46.04 +3.15 19
Britt Janyk Downhill 1:46.21 +2.02 6
Super-G 1:22.89 +2.75 17
Giant slalom 1:18.13 +3.01 29 1:11.66 +0.51 8 2:29.79 +2.68 25
Erin Mielzynski Slalom 52.60 +1.85 19 53.49 +1.57 18 1:46.09 +3.20 20
Marie-Pier Préfontaine Giant slalom 1:18.01 +2.89 27 1:12.50 +1.35 23 2:30.51 +3.40 29
Shona Rubens Downhill 1:48.53 +4.34 21
Super combined 1:26.90 +2.74 17 45.68 +1.99 13 2:12.58 +3.44 12
Super-G DNF
Giant slalom 1:17.38 +2.26 22 1:12.87 +1.72 26 2:30.25 +3.14 28
Georgia Simmerling Downhill DNS
Super combined DNS
Super-G 1:25.21 +5.07 27

Biathlon

Jean Philippe Leguellec competes in biathlon.

Canada sent eight biathletes to Vancouver. Canada had four individual entries in women's events but only one individual entry in men's events. However, as the host nation Canada was allowed to send a men's relay team. The men's team comprised Jean Philippe Leguellec, Marc-André Bédard, Brendan Green and Robin Clegg. The women's team, meanwhile, comprised Zina Kocher, Megan Imrie, Megan Tandy and Rosanna Crawford.[22]

Bobsleigh

Helen Upperton displays the silver medal she won in the two-woman competition.

As the host nation, Canada was guaranteed an entry in all three events (two-man, two-woman and four-man).[23] Canada's full 12 athlete team was announced on 27 January 2010.[24]

Athlete Event Run 1 Run 2 Run 3 Run 4 Total
Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank
Pierre Lueders
Jesse Lumsden
Two-man 51.94 7 52.12 5 51.87 4 51.94 5 3:27.87 5
Lyndon Rush
Lascelles Brown
Two-man 51.67 3 54.70 23 51.93 6 52.16 8 3:30.46 15
Kaillie Humphries
Heather Moyse
Two-woman 53.19 1 53.01 1 52.85 1 53.23 2 3:32.28 1st, gold medalist(s)
Helen Upperton
Shelley-Ann Brown
Two-woman 53.50 5 53.12 3 53.34 3 53.17 1 3:33.13 2nd, silver medalist(s)
Lyndon Rush
Lascelles Brown
Chris Le Bihan
David Bissett
Four-man 51.12 2 51.03 2 51.24 2 51.46 2 3:24.85 3rd, bronze medalist(s)
Pierre Lueders
Justin Kripps
Jesse Lumsden
Neville Wright
Four-man 51.27 6 51.29 6 51.50 5 51.54 4 3:25.60 5

Cross-country skiing

The 11 athlete team was announced on 22 January 2010. The team consisted of Ivan Babikov, George Grey, Alex Harvey, Devon Kershaw, Stefan Kuhn, Brian McKeever, 2006 gold medalist Chandra Crawford, Daria Gaiazova, Perianne Jones, 2006 silver medalist Sara Renner and Madeleine Williams.[25] Brian McKeever, who is legally blind, competed at the 2002 and 2006 Winter Paralympics in both cross-country skiing and biathlon. He won four gold medals (two at each Games) in cross-country skiing as well as a silver and a bronze in biathlon. He would have been the first athlete in Olympic history ever to compete in the Winter Olympics after participating in the Paralympics.[25] Four more cross-country skiers were announced on 27 January 2010: Drew Goldsack, Brent McMurtry, Gordon Jewett and Brittany Webster.[26]

Men[27]
Athlete Event Qualification Quarterfinals Semifinals Final
Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank
Ivan Babikov 15 km freestyle 34:30.0 8
30 km pursuit 1:15:20.5 5
50 km classic 2:10:50.2 33
Drew Goldsack Sprint 3:44.28 40 Did not qualify 40
George Grey 15 km freestyle 35:13.0 29
30 km pursuit 1:15:32.0 8
50 km classic 2:06:18.1 18
Alex Harvey 15 km freestyle 34:55.6 21
30 km pursuit 1:15:43.0 9
50 km classic 2:10:49.9 32
Gordon Jewett 15 km freestyle 36:17.9 52
Devon Kershaw Sprint 3:40.50 24 Q 3:39.9 5 Did not qualify 23
30 km pursuit 1:16:23.6 16
50 km classic 2:05:37.1 5
Stefan Kuhn Sprint 3:38.35 10 Q 3:37.4 3 Did not qualify 15
Brian McKeever
Brent McMurtry Sprint 3:45.02 41 Did not qualify 41
Devon Kershaw,
Alex Harvey
Team sprint 18:49.2 4 LL 19:07.3 4
Devon Kershaw,
Alex Harvey,
Ivan Babikov,
George Grey
4 x 10 km relay 1:47:03.2 7
Women[27]
Athlete Event Qualification Quarterfinals Semifinals Final
Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank
Chandra Crawford Sprint 3:47.25 18 Q 3:50.0 6 Did not qualify 26
Daria Gaiazova Sprint 3:46.97 17 Q 3:44.4 5 Did not qualify 22
15 km pursuit 44:35.9 47
Perianne Jones Sprint 3:54.27 41 Did not qualify 41
15 km pursuit 45:48.7 57
Sara Renner Sprint 3:51.79 34 Did not qualify 34
15 km pursuit 41:37.9 10
30 km classic 1:34:04.2 16
Brittany Webster
Madeleine Williams 10 km freestyle 27:43.6 51
15 km pursuit 44:11.2 41
30 km classic 1:42:33.7 46
Daria Gaiazova,
Sara Renner
Team sprint 18:54.9 4 LL 18:51.8 7
Daria Gaiazova,
Perianne Jones,
Chandra Crawford,
Madeleine Williams
4 x 5 km relay 1:00:05.0 15

Curling

Kevin Martin throws a stone during a curling match.

Canada qualified both a men's and women's team. The representatives were decided at the 2009 Canadian Olympic Curling Trials, held 6-13 December 2009, in Edmonton.[28]Brad Gushue and his team, the gold medalists in the men's tournament in 2006, were unable to qualify for the trials, and did not get the chance to defend their gold medal.[29] In the men's tournament, Canada was represented by the team of Kevin Martin, John Morris, Marc Kennedy and Ben Hebert. This was the second Olympic tournament for Martin, who won a silver medal at the 2002 Winter Olympics.[30] In the women's tournament, the team of Cheryl Bernard, Susan O'Connor, Carolyn Darbyshire and Cori Bartel participated.[31]

Summary
Team Event Group Stage Tiebreaker Semifinal Final / BM
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Rank Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Rank
Ben Hebert
Marc Kennedy
Kevin Martin
John Morris
Adam Enright
Men's tournament  NOR
W 7-6
 GER
W 9-4
 SWE
W 7-3
 FRA
W 12-5
 DEN
W 10-3
 GBR
W 7-6
 SUI
W 6-4
 USA
W 7-2
 CHN
W 10-3
1 Q BYE  SWE
W 6-3
 NOR
W 6-3
1st, gold medalist(s)
Cori Bartel
Cheryl Bernard
Carolyn Darbyshire
Susan O'Connor
Kristie Moore
Women's tournament  SUI
W 5-4
 JPN
W 7-6
 GER
W 6-5
 DEN
W 5-4
 USA
W 9-2
 CHN
L 5-6
 SWE
W 6-2
 GBR
W 6-5
 RUS
W 7-3
1 Q N/A  SUI
W 6-5
 SWE
L 6-7
2nd, silver medalist(s)

Men's tournament

Standings

Final round robin standings

Key
Teams to playoffs
Teams to tiebreaker
Country
Skip W L PF PA Ends
won
Ends
lost
Blank
ends
Stolen
ends
Shot %
 Canada Kevin Martin 9 0 75 36 36 28 14 2 85%
 Norway Thomas Ulsrud 7 2 64 43 40 32 15 7 84%
 Switzerland Ralph Stöckli 6 3 53 45 35 33 20 8 81%
 Sweden Niklas Edin 5 4 50 52 34 36 20 6 82%
 Great Britain David Murdoch 5 4 57 44 35 29 20 9 81%
 Germany Andy Kapp 4 5 48 60 35 38 11 9 75%
 France Thomas Dufour 3 6 31 58 22 34 16 7 73%
 China Wang Fengchun 2 7 52 60 37 37 9 7 77%
 Denmark Ulrik Schmidt 2 7 40 57 31 29 12 6 78%
 United States John Shuster 2 7 43 59 32 41 18 9 76%
Round-robin

Canada had a bye in draws 3, 7 and 11.

Semifinal

Thursday, 25 February, 14:00

Sheet B 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Final
 Sweden (Edin) 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 x 3
 Canada (Martin) Hammer (Last Stone First End) 0 1 0 1 2 2 0 0 0 x 6
Gold medal game

Saturday, 27 February, 15:00

Sheet 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Final
 Canada (Martin) Hammer (Last Stone First End) 0 1 0 1 1 0 2 0 1 x 6
 Norway (Ulsrud) 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 x 3

Women's tournament

Standings

Final round robin standings

Key
Teams to playoffs
Country
Skip W L PF PA Ends
won
Ends
lost
Blank
ends
Stolen
ends
Shot %
 Canada Cheryl Bernard 8 1 56 37 40 29 20 13 81%
 Sweden Anette Norberg 7 2 56 52 36 36 13 5 79%
 China Wang Bingyu 6 3 61 47 39 37 12 7 74%
 Switzerland Mirjam Ott 6 3 67 48 40 36 7 12 76%
 Denmark Angelina Jensen 4 5 49 61 31 40 15 5 74%
 Germany Andrea Schöpp 3 6 52 56 35 40 15 4 75%
 Great Britain Eve Muirhead 3 6 54 59 36 41 11 10 75%
 Japan Moe Meguro 3 6 64 70 36 37 13 5 73%
 Russia Liudmila Privivkova 3 6 53 60 36 40 14 13 77%
 United States Debbie McCormick 2 7 43 65 36 36 12 12 77%
Round-robin

Canada had a bye in draws 3, 5 and 7.

Semifinal

Thursday, 25 February, 09:00

Sheet 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Final
 Canada (Bernard) Hammer (Last Stone First End) 1 0 2 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 6
 Switzerland (Ott) 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 5
Gold medal game

Friday, 26 February, 15:00

Sheet C 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Final
 Canada (Bernard) Hammer (Last Stone First End) 0 1 0 1 0 1 2 0 1 0 0 6
 Sweden (Norberg) 0 0 2 0 2 0 0 0 0 2 1 7

Freestyle skiing

Alexandre Bilodeau displays the gold medal he won in the moguls competition.

The full 18 athlete freestyle skiing team was announced on 24 January 2010.[32]Dave Duncan was originally named to the men's ski cross team, but he broke his collarbone during a training run at the Olympics and was unable to compete. Brady Leman was named his replacement.[33] However, Leman aggravated a broken tibia he suffered in 2009, and also did not compete. Replacing both of them was Davey Barr.[34]

Moguls and aerials
Athlete Event Qualifying Final
Points Rank Points Rank
Kyle Nissen Men's aerials 233.71 9 Q 239.31 5
Steve Omischl Men's aerials 233.88 8 Q 233.66 8
Warren Shouldice Men's aerials 235.93 6 Q 223.30 10
Alexandre Bilodeau Men's moguls 25.48 2 Q 26.75 1st, gold medalist(s)
Vincent Marquis Men's moguls 23.71 13 Q 25.88 4
Pierre-Alexandre Rousseau Men's moguls 24.36 7 Q 25.83 5
Maxime Gingras Men's moguls 24.37 6 Q 24.13 10
Veronika Bauer Women's aerials 160.46 15 DNQ 15
Jennifer Heil Women's moguls 25.50 2 Q 25.69 2nd, silver medalist(s)
Kristi Richards Women's moguls 24.63 4 Q 4.36 20
Chloé Dufour-Lapointe Women's moguls 23.74 9 Q 23.87 5
Ski cross
Athlete Event Qualifying 1/8 finals Quarterfinals Semifinals Finals
Time Rank Position Position Position Position Rank
Davey Barr Men's ski cross 1:14.98 25 Q 2 Q 2 Q 3 Small Final
2
6
Christopher Del Bosco Men's ski cross 1:12.89 2 Q 1 Q 1 Q 2 Q 4 4
Stanley Hayer Men's ski cross 1:13.74 10 Q 2 Q 4 DNQ 10
Ashleigh McIvor Women's ski cross 1:17.17 2 Q 1 Q 1 Q 2 Q 1 1st, gold medalist(s)
Julia Murray Women's ski cross 1:19.54 14 Q 2 Q 4 DNQ 12
Danielle Poleschuk Women's ski cross 1:19.02 10 Q 3 DNQ 19
Kelsey Serwa Women's ski cross 1:17.94 4 Q 1 Q 1 Q 3 Small Final
1
5

Figure skating

Scott Moir and Tessa Virtue, gold medalists in the ice dancing.

Canada qualified two athletes or pairs in each of the four events for a total of 12 athletes.[35][36] Participants were decided at the 2010 Canadian Figure Skating Championships.

Athlete(s) Event CD SP/OD FS/FD Total
Points Rank Points Rank Points Rank Points Rank
Patrick Chan[37] Men's
81.12
7
160.30
4
241.42
5
Vaughn Chipeur[37] Men's
57.22
24
113.70
21
170.92
23
Joannie Rochette[38] Ladies'
71.36
3
131.28
3
202.64
3rd, bronze medalist(s)
Cynthia Phaneuf[38] Ladies'
57.16
14
99.46
13
156.62
12
Jessica Dubé & Bryce Davison[39] Pairs
65.36
6
121.75
6
187.11
6
Anabelle Langlois & Cody Hay[39] Pairs
64.20
7
115.77
9
179.97
9
Tessa Virtue & Scott Moir[37] Ice dancing
42.74
2
68.41
1
110.42
1
221.57
1st, gold medalist(s)
Vanessa Crone & Paul Poirier[37] Ice dancing
31.14
15
48.17
17
85.29
12
164.60
14

Ice hockey

Canada men's national hockey team celebrating after winning the gold medal.

National teams are co-ordinated by Hockey Canada and players are chosen by the team's management staff.[40] The men's and women's national teams both qualified for the 2010 Winter Olympics.[41]

With Vancouver being home to the Canucks, the 2010 Winter Olympics were the first to take place in an NHL market since the league started allowing its players to compete in the games in 1998 in Nagano, Japan.

Men's tournament

A group of about 45 players were invited to an orientation camp in August 2009 (although players not invited could also have been named to the team) and the final 23 man roster was announced on 30 December 2009.[42][43] The team was coached by Mike Babcock and included assistant coaches Ken Hitchcock, Lindy Ruff and Jacques Lemaire.[44]

Roster

The following is the Canadian roster in the men's ice hockey tournament of the 2010 Winter Olympics.[45]

No. Pos. Name Height Weight Birthdate Birthplace 2009-10 team
30 G Martin Brodeur 188 cm (6 ft 2 in) 98 kg (216 lb) 6 May 1972 Montreal, QC United States New Jersey Devils (NHL)
29 G Marc-André Fleury 188 cm (6 ft 2 in) 82 kg (181 lb) 28 November 1984 Sorel-Tracy, QC United States Pittsburgh Penguins (NHL)
1 G Roberto Luongo 191 cm (6 ft 3 in) 93 kg (205 lb) 4 April 1979 Montreal, QC Canada Vancouver Canucks (NHL)
22 D Dan Boyle 180 cm (5 ft 11 in) 86 kg (190 lb) 12 July 1976 Ottawa, ON United States San Jose Sharks (NHL)
8 D Drew Doughty 185 cm (6 ft 1 in) 92 kg (203 lb) 8 December 1989 London, ON United States Los Angeles Kings (NHL)
2 D Duncan Keith 183 cm (6 ft 0 in) 85 kg (187 lb) 16 July 1983 Winnipeg, MB United States Chicago Blackhawks (NHL)
27 D Scott Niedermayer - C 185 cm (6 ft 1 in) 91 kg (201 lb) 31 August 1973 Cranbrook, BC United States Anaheim Ducks (NHL)
20 D Chris Pronger - A 198 cm (6 ft 6 in) 101 kg (223 lb) 10 October 1974 Dryden, ON United States Philadelphia Flyers (NHL)
7 D Brent Seabrook 191 cm (6 ft 3 in) 100 kg (220 lb) 20 April 1985 Richmond, BC United States Chicago Blackhawks (NHL)
6 D Shea Weber 193 cm (6 ft 4 in) 103 kg (227 lb) 14 August 1985 Sicamous, BC United States Nashville Predators (NHL)
37 F Patrice Bergeron 188 cm (6 ft 2 in) 88 kg (194 lb) 24 July 1985 L'Ancienne-Lorette, QC United States Boston Bruins (NHL)
87 F Sidney Crosby - A 180 cm (5 ft 11 in) 90 kg (200 lb) 7 August 1987 Cole Harbour, NS United States Pittsburgh Penguins (NHL)
51 F Ryan Getzlaf 193 cm (6 ft 4 in) 100 kg (220 lb) 10 May 1985 Regina, SK United States Anaheim Ducks (NHL)
15 F Dany Heatley 191 cm (6 ft 3 in) 100 kg (220 lb) 21 January 1981 Freiburg im Breisgau, United States San Jose Sharks (NHL)
12 F Jarome Iginla - A 185 cm (6 ft 1 in) 95 kg (209 lb) 1 July 1977 Edmonton, AB Canada Calgary Flames (NHL)
11 F Patrick Marleau 188 cm (6 ft 2 in) 100 kg (220 lb) 15 September 1979 Swift Current, SK United States San Jose Sharks (NHL)
10 F Brenden Morrow 180 cm (5 ft 11 in) 95 kg (209 lb) 16 January 1979 Carlyle, SK United States Dallas Stars (NHL)
61 F Rick Nash 193 cm (6 ft 4 in) 99 kg (218 lb) 16 June 1984 Brampton, ON United States Columbus Blue Jackets (NHL)
18 F Mike Richards 180 cm (5 ft 11 in) 91 kg (201 lb) 11 February 1985 Kenora, ON United States Philadelphia Flyers (NHL)
24 F Corey Perry 191 cm (6 ft 3 in) 95 kg (209 lb) 16 May 1985 Peterborough, ON United States Anaheim Ducks (NHL)
21 F Eric Staal 193 cm (6 ft 4 in) 93 kg (205 lb) 29 October 1984 Thunder Bay, ON United States Carolina Hurricanes (NHL)
19 F Joe Thornton 193 cm (6 ft 4 in) 107 kg (236 lb) 2 July 1979 London, ON United States San Jose Sharks (NHL)
16 F Jonathan Toews 188 cm (6 ft 2 in) 96 kg (212 lb) 29 April 1988 Winnipeg, MB United States Chicago Blackhawks (NHL)

Defencemen Jay Bouwmeester and Stéphane Robidas, forwards Jeff Carter, Steven Stamkos and Martin St. Louis, and goaltender Chris Mason were selected as reserves in case of injury during the tournament.[46]

Group play

Canada played in Group A.

Round-robin

All times are local (UTC-8).

16 February 2010
16:30
Canada 8-0
(0-0, 3-0, 5-0)
 NorwayCanada Hockey Place, Vancouver
Attendance: 16,652
18 February 2010
16:30
Switzerland  2-3 (SO)
(0-1, 2-1, 0-0, 0-0, 0-1)
 CanadaCanada Hockey Place, Vancouver
Attendance: 17,019
21 February 2010
16:40
Canada 3-5
(1-2, 1-1, 1-2)
 United StatesCanada Hockey Place, Vancouver
Attendance: 16,910
Standings
Team
GP W OTW OTL L GF GA GD Pts
 United States 3 3 0 0 0 14 5 +9 9
 Canada 3 1 1 0 1 14 7 +7 5
  Switzerland 3 0 1 1 1 8 10 −2 3
 Norway 3 0 0 1 2 5 19 −14 1

Final rounds

Qualification playoff
23 February 2010
16:30
Canada 8-2
(1-0, 3-1, 4-1)
 GermanyCanada Hockey Place, Vancouver
Attendance: 17,723
Quarterfinal
24 February 2010
16:30
Russia 3-7
(1-4, 2-3, 0-0)
 CanadaCanada Hockey Place, Vancouver
Attendance: 17,740
Semifinal
26 February 2010
18:30
Canada 3-2
(2-0, 1-0, 0-2)
 SlovakiaCanada Hockey Place, Vancouver
Attendance: 17,799
Gold medal game
28 February 2010
12:15
2nd, silver medalist(s) United States 2-3 (OT)
(0-1, 1-1, 1-0, 0-1)
 Canada 1st, gold medalist(s)Canada Hockey Place, Vancouver
Attendance: 17,748

Women's tournament

In March 2009, the national team staff named 22 players to the 2009 World Championship team, as well as four additional players who would not compete in 2009 but could potentially be included in the Olympic roster.[47] The final roster of 21 players was announced on 21 December 2009. Brianne Jenner, Jocelyne Larocque,[48] Delaney Collins, Jennifer Wakefield and Gillian Ferrari were included in the centralized roster, but were cut before the Olympics.[49] The team, which includes 14 Olympic veterans and seven players making their Olympic debut, is coached by Melody Davidson.[50]

Roster

The following is the Canadian roster in the women's ice hockey tournament of the 2010 Winter Olympics.[51]

Position Name Height (cm) Weight (kg) Birthdate Birthplace 2009-10 team
G Charline Labonté 175 78 15 October 1982 Boisbriand, Quebec McGill Martlets
G Kim St-Pierre 175 70 14 December 1978 Châteauguay, Quebec Montreal Stars
G Shannon Szabados 172 66 6 August 1986 Edmonton, Alberta Grant MacEwan Griffins
D Tessa Bonhomme 170 63 23 July 1985 Sudbury, Ontario Calgary Oval X-Treme
D Carla MacLeod 162 60 16 June 1982 Spruce Grove, Alberta Calgary Oval X-Treme
D Becky Kellar 170 70 1 January 1975 Hagersville, Ontario Burlington Barracudas
D Colleen Sostorics 162 78 17 December 1979 Kennedy, Saskatchewan Calgary Oval X-Treme
D Meaghan Mikkelson 175 74 4 January 1985 Regina, Saskatchewan Edmonton Chimos
D Catherine Ward 167 61 27 February 1987 Montreal, Quebec McGill Martlets
F Meghan Agosta 167 66 12 February 1987 Ruthven, Ontario Mercyhurst Lakers
F Gillian Apps 182 78 2 November 1983 Toronto, Ontario Brampton Thunder
F Jennifer Botterill 175 69 1 May 1979 Winnipeg, Manitoba Mississauga Chiefs
F Jayna Hefford - A 165 63 14 May 1977 Kingston, Ontario Brampton Thunder
F Haley Irwin 170 74 6 June 1988 Thunder Bay, Ontario Minnesota-Duluth Bulldogs
F Rebecca Johnston 170 61 24 September 1989 Sudbury, Ontario Cornell Big Red
F Gina Kingsbury 172 62 26 November 1981 Uranium City, Saskatchewan Calgary Oval X-Treme
F Caroline Ouellette - A 180 78 25 May 1979 Montreal, Quebec Montreal Stars
F Cherie Piper 167 75 29 June 1981 Toronto, Ontario Calgary Oval X-Treme
F Marie-Philip Poulin 167 73 28 March 1991 Beauceville, Quebec Dawson Blues
F Sarah Vaillancourt 167 63 8 May 1985 Sherbrooke, Quebec Harvard Crimson
F Hayley Wickenheiser - C 177 77 12 August 1978 Shaunavon, Saskatchewan Eskilstuna Linden

Group play

Canada will play in Group A.

Round-robin

All times are local (UTC-8).

13 February 2010
17:00
Canada 18-0
(7-0, 6-0, 5-0)
 SlovakiaCanada Hockey Place, Vancouver
Attendance: 16,496
15 February 2010
14:30
Switzerland  1-10
(0-2, 1-3, 0-5)
 CanadaUBC Winter Sports Centre, Vancouver
Attendance: 5,413
17 February 2010
14:30
Canada 13-1
(5-0, 7-0, 1-1)
 SwedenUBC Winter Sports Centre, Vancouver
Attendance: 5,483
Standings
Team
GP W OTW OTL L GF GA GD Pts
 Canada 3 3 0 0 0 41 2 39 9
 Sweden 3 2 0 0 1 10 15 -5 6
  Switzerland 3 1 0 0 2 6 15 -9 3
 Slovakia 3 0 0 0 3 4 29 -25 0

Final rounds

Semifinal
22 February 2010
17:00
Finland 0-5
(0-2, 0-1, 0-2)
 CanadaCanada Hockey Place, Vancouver
Attendance: 16,324
Gold medal game
25 February 2010
15:30
1st, gold medalist(s) Canada 2-0
(2-0, 0-0, 0-0)
 United States 2nd, silver medalist(s)Canada Hockey Place, Vancouver
Attendance: 16,805

Luge

Canada's Olympic luge team, announced on 19 December 2009, in Whistler, British Columbia, consisted of ten athletes: six individual competitors and two teams for the doubles event. The women's team consisted of Alex Gough, Regan Lauscher and Meaghan Simister. The men's singles team will comprise Sam Edney, Jeff Christie and Ian Cockerline. For the men's doubles event, two teams participated: Chris & Mike Moffat; and Tristan Walker & Justin Snith.[52] The Fast Track Group, the title sponsor of the team, announced that they would give $1 million (which would be split between the athlete and Canadian Luge Federation) to any athlete that won a gold medal. The company also offered $50,000 for a silver and $5,000 for a bronze.[53]

Athlete(s) Event Run 1 Run 2 Run 3 Run 4 Total
Time Time Time Time Time Rank
Sam Edney Men's 48.754 48.793 48.920 48.373 3:14.840 7
Jeff Christie Men's 48.881 48.904 49.308 48.370 3:15.823 14
Ian Cockerline Men's 49.033 49.132 49.297 48.781 3:16.243 20
Alex Gough Women's 42.275 42.411 42.346 42.359 2:49.391 18
Regan Lauscher Women's 42.368 42.289 42.211 42.153 2:49.021 15
Meaghan Simister Women's 42.524 42.497 42.787 42.662 2:50.470 25
Chris Moffat & Mike Moffat Doubles 41.675 41.723 1:23.398 7
Tristan Walker & Justin Snith Doubles 42.100 42.120 1:24.220 15

Nordic combined

Canada sent a single athlete, Jason Myslicki, to compete in the Nordic combined.[54]

Athlete Event Ski jumping Cross-country
Points Rank Deficit Time Rank
Jason Myslicki Large hill/10 km 69.3 42 3:51 27:02.4 44
Normal hill/10 km 93.0 43 2:50 30:10.7 45

Note: 'Deficit' refers to the amount of time behind the leader a competitor began the cross-country portion of the event. Italicized numbers show the final deficit from the winner's finishing time.

Short track speed skating

As the host nation, Canada can send a full team of five men and five women for short track speed skating.[55]Charles Hamelin finished third overall at the 2009 World Short Track Speed Skating Championships and was guaranteed a spot in the 2010 team by Speed Skating Canada.[56] At the Canadian short-track speedskating trials, Jessica Gregg, Marianne St-Gelais, Kalyna Roberge and Tania Vicent[57] earned spots on the women's team and Olivier Jean and Guillaume Bastille earned spots on the men's team with their performances.[58]Valérie Maltais and François Hamelin were added to the women's and men's teams respectively as discretionary picks by the coaches.[59]François-Louis Tremblay was unable to participate in the trials due to an ankle injury, but was given a bye and was named to the team. The number of skaters that will participate in each event will be determined by the team's performances at the first three World Cup events for the 2009-10 season.[59]

Men
Athlete Event Heat Quarterfinal Semifinal Final
Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank
François Hamelin 1000m 1:25.714 1 Q 1:25.037 2 Q 1:45.324 3 ADV 1:25.206 5
Charles Hamelin 500m 41.463 1 Q 40.770 1 Q 40.964 1 Q 40.981 1st, gold medalist(s)
1000m 1:25.256 1 Q 1:25.300 1 Q 1:25.062 2 Q 1:24.329 4
1500m 2:16.153 2 Q 2:11.225 3 q Final B
2:11.225
7
François-Louis Tremblay 500m 41.397 1 Q 41.326 1 Q 41.515 2 Q 46.366 3rd, bronze medalist(s)
Olivier Jean 500m 41.737 2 Q 41.275 2 Q DQ Did not advance 9
1500m 2:14.279 1 Q 2:32.358 5 ADV 2:14.279 4
Guillaume Bastille 1500m DQ Did not advance T34
Charles Hamelin
François Hamelin
François-Louis Tremblay
Olivier Jean
Guillaume Bastille
5000m relay 6:43.610 2 Q 6:44.224 1st, gold medalist(s)
Women
Athlete Event Heat Quarterfinal Semifinal Final
Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank
Jessica Gregg 500m 44.009 2 Q 43.956 2 Q 43.854 1 Q 44.204 4
1000m 1:32.565 1 Q 1:30.207 2 Q 1:33.139 4 q Final B
1:32.333
2
Marianne St-Gelais 500m 44.708 1 Q 44.316 1 Q 43.241 2 Q 43.707 Silver medal icon.svg
Valérie Maltais 1500m 2:30.321 3 Q 2:23.722 5 Did not advance 14
Kalyna Roberge 500m 44.254 2 Q 44.143 2 Q 43.633 3 q Final B
43.633
6
1000m 1:31.033 1 Q 1:31.479 2 Q 1:30.736 3 q Final B
1:32.122
3
1500m 2:23.619 2 Q 2:47.998 5 Did not advance 13
Tania Vicent 1000m 1:37.561 2 Q DQ Did not advance 17
1500m 2:24.100 2 Q 2:24.742 2 Q 2:23.035 8
Kalyna Roberge
Marianne St-Gelais
Jessica Gregg
Tania Vicent
3000m relay 4:11.476 2 Q 4:09.137 2nd, silver medalist(s)

Skeleton

Canada's full six athlete team was announced on 27 January 2010.[24]

Athlete(s) Event Run 1 Run 2 Run 3 Run 4 Total
Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank
Jon Montgomery Men's 52.60 2 52.57 2 52.20 1 52.36 1 3:29.73 1st, gold medalist(s)
Jeff Pain Men's 53.03 9 53.18 10 53.00 11 52.65 3 3:31.86 9
Michael Douglas Men's 52.83 5 53.04 7 Disqualified
Amy Gough Women's 54.14 2 54.78 7 53.92 6 54.17 7 3:37.01 7
Mellisa Hollingsworth Women's 54.18 5 54.17 3 53.81 2 54.44 11 3:36.60 5
Michelle Kelly Women's 54.73 12 55.49 13 55.56 18 55.01 14 3:40.79 13

Ski jumping

Canada's ski jumping team comprised Stefan Read, Mackenzie Boyd-Clowes, Trevor Morrice and Eric Mitchell.[60] None of them reached the final.

Athlete Event Qualifying First round Final
Points Rank Points Rank Points Total Rank
Mackenzie Boyd-Clowes Normal hill 105.0 44 DNQ 53
Large hill 111.0 45 DNQ 55
Eric Mitchell Normal hill 98.5 49 DNQ 58
Large hill 93.0 51 DNQ 61
Trevor Morrice Normal hill 103.5 46 DNQ 55
Large hill 106.0 49 DNQ 59
Stefan Read Normal hill 103.0 47 DNQ 56
Large hill 120.5 36 Q 71.6 46 DNQ 46
Mackenzie Boyd-Clowes
Eric Mitchell
Trevor Morrice
Stefan Read
Team 294.6 12 DNQ 12

Snowboarding

Jasey-Jay Anderson secured an Olympic berth in the Parallel Giant Slalom by winning the event at the 2009 FIS Snowboarding World Championships.[61] The full 18 athlete team was announced on 25 January 2010.[62]

Halfpipe
Athlete Event Qualifying Semifinal Final
Run 1 Run 2 Rank Run 1 Run 2 Rank Run 1 Run 2 Rank
Jeff Batchelor Men's halfpipe 14.9 18.5 17 Did not advance 32
Justin Lamoureux Men's halfpipe 12.6 35.4 9 QS 36.2 20.2 6 QF 33.8 35.9 7
Brad Martin Men's halfpipe 11.2 27.5 13 Did not advance 23
Sarah Conrad Women's halfpipe 14.4 31.2 15 QS 17.8 21.4 12 Did not advance 18
Mercedes Nicoll Women's halfpipe 31.1 34.6 10 QS 40.1 28.5 3 QF 34.3 2.9 6
Palmer Taylor Women's halfpipe 12.9 13.7 26 Did not advance 26
Parallel GS
Athlete Event Qualification Round of 16 Quarterfinals Semifinals Finals
Time Rank Opposition
time
Opposition
time
Opposition
time
Opposition
time
Rank
Jasey-Jay Anderson Men's parallel giant slalom 1:17.97 10 Q  Tyler Jewell (USA) (7)
W -1.18
 Rok Flander (SLO) (15)
W -7.02
 Stanislav Detkov (RUS) (11)
W -1.72
 Benjamin Karl (AUT) (4)
W -0.35
1st, gold medalist(s)
Michael Lambert Men's parallel giant slalom 1:17.81 6 Q  Stanislav Detkov (RUS) (11)
L +12.05
Did not advance 12
Matthew Morison Men's parallel giant slalom 1:17.69 5 Q  ?an Ko?ir (SLO) (12)
L +0.25
Did not advance 11
Caroline Calvé Women's parallel giant slalom 1:26.38 20 Did not advance 20
Alexa Loo Women's parallel giant slalom 1:24.22 9 Q  Ankes Karstens (GER) (8)
L +0.01
Did not advance 12
Kimiko Zakreski Women's parallel giant slalom DNF 29 Did not advance 29

Key: '+ Time' represents a deficit; the brackets indicate the results of each run.

Snowboard cross
Athlete Event Qualifying 1/8 finals Quarterfinals Semifinals Finals
Time Rank Position Position Position Position Rank
François Boivin Men's snowboard cross 1:32.72 15 Q 1 Q 4 Did not advance 12
Robert Fagan Men's snowboard cross 1:23.06 10 Q 1 Q 1 Q 3 q Small Final
1
5
Drew Neilson Men's snowboard cross 1:22.01 11 Q 2 Q 4 Did not advance 11
Mike Robertson Men's snowboard cross 1:20.15 3 Q 1 Q 1 Q 1 Q 2 2nd, silver medalist(s)
Dominique Maltais Women's snowboard cross 1:45.56 20 Did not advance 20
Maëlle Ricker Women's snowboard cross 1:25.45 3 Q 1 Q 1 Q 1 1st, gold medalist(s)

Speed skating

Clara Hughes after winning the bronze medal in the 5000 metres.

Canada's speed skating team consisted of eight men and eight women.[63] Canadian speed skaters participated in every event, with the exception of the men's 10,000 m. The team was named on 11 January 2010.[64]

Men
Athlete Event Race 1 Race 2 Final
Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank
Mathieu Giroux 1500 m 1:47.62 14
Jamie Gregg 500 m 35.142 9 35.126 8 70.26 8
Mike Ireland 500 m 35.38 17 35.253 13 70.63 16
Lucas Makowsky 1500 m 1:48.61 19
5000 m 6:28.71 13
Denny Morrison 1000 m 1:10.30 13
1500 m 1:46.93 9
5000 m 6:33.78 18
Kyle Parrott 500 m 35.57 21 35.767 23 71.344 21
1000 m 1:10.89 24
1500 m 1:52.67 37
François-Olivier Roberge 1000 m 1:10.75 20
Jeremy Wotherspoon 500 m 35.09 5 35.188 12 70.282 9
1000 m 1:10.35 14
Women
Athlete Event Race 1 Race 2 Final
Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank
Anastasia Bucsis 500 m 39.879 34 39.876 35 79.755 34
Kristina Groves 1000 m 1:16.78 4
1500 m 1:57.14 2nd, silver medalist(s)
3000 m 4:04.84 3rd, bronze medalist(s)
5000 m 7:04.57 6
Clara Hughes 3000 m 4:06.01 5
5000 m 6:55.73 3rd, bronze medalist(s)
Cindy Klassen 1500 m 2:00.67 21
3000 m 4:15.53 14
5000 m 7:22.09 12
Christine Nesbitt 500 m 38.881 13 38.694 8 77.57 10
1000 m 1:16.56 1st, gold medalist(s)
1500 m 1:58.33 6
Tamara Oudenaarden 500 m DNS
Shannon Rempel 500 m 39.351 22 39.473 29 78.82 27
1000 m 1:18.174 21
Brittany Schussler 1000 m 1:18.31 25
1500 m 2:04.17 35
Team pursuit
Athlete Event Quarterfinal Semifinal Final
Opposition
time
Opposition
time
Opposition
time
Rank
Mathieu Giroux,
Lucas Makowsky,
Denny Morrison
Men's team pursuit  Italy
W -3.97
 Norway
W -1.22
 United States
W -0.21
1st, gold medalist(s)
Kristina Groves,
Christine Nesbitt,
Brittany Schussler
Women's team pursuit  United States
L +0.05
Did not advance Final C
 Netherlands
W +0.63
5

See also

References

  1. ^ Mickleburgh, Rod (29 January 2010). "Clara Hughes named Canada's Olympic flag-bearer". CTV Olympics. Retrieved 2010.
  2. ^ "Joannie Rochette will carry Canadian flag". CTV.ca. 28 February 2010. Retrieved 2010.
  3. ^ Christie, James (29 January 2010). "Cool, cocky, confident and yes, Canadian". The Globe and Mail. CTV Olympics. Retrieved 2010.
  4. ^ a b Canadian Press (27 February 2010). "Canada sets Olympic gold record". CBC Sports. Retrieved 2010.
  5. ^ Associated Press (23 January 2010). "Visually impaired skier Brian McKeever to make Olympic history". Boston Herald.
  6. ^ Kingston, Gary (22 January 2010). "Brian McKeever, first Winter Olympic/Paralympic athlete, sees his dream come true". Vancouver Sun. Archived from the original on 10 April 2010.
  7. ^ a b Panetta, Alexander (7 May 2009). "MPs want 2010 athletes to wear seal skin". Toronto Star. Retrieved 2009.
  8. ^ Inwood, Damian (7 May 2009). "Seal-skin Olympic uniform bid loses wind". The Province.
  9. ^ Panetta, Alexander (7 May 2009). "Canadian Olympians won't wear seal skin". Retrieved 2009.
  10. ^ Lee, Jeff; Oviatt, Dale; James, Peter (11 February 2009). "On your marks: Vancouver Olympics one year away". Calgary Herald. Retrieved 2009.[dead link]
  11. ^ "Canada's jerseys through the ages". CTV Olympics. 17 August 2009. Retrieved 2009.
  12. ^ Beacon, Bill (5 January 2009). "Hockey Canada's logo unlikely to be used at 2010 Olympics". Winnipeg Sun. Retrieved 2009.[dead link]
  13. ^ Christie, James; Maki, Allan (31 March 2009). "Olympic committee won't try to save logo". The Globe and Mail. Retrieved 2009.
  14. ^ Kernaghan, John (4 November 2008). "Hockey Canada in logo flap with national Olympic body". Hamilton Spectator. Retrieved 2009.
  15. ^ Adams, Alan (31 December 2008). "Bob Nicholson fuming over COC jersey decision". CBC Sports. Retrieved 2009.
  16. ^ "Hockey Canada unveils Olympic jerseys". CTV Olympics. 17 August 2009. Retrieved 2009.
  17. ^ Brunt, Stephen (21 September 2009). "Sentiment won't play a role in selecting alpine team". The Globe and Mail. CTV Olympics. Retrieved 2009.
  18. ^ Christie, James (9 June 2009). "Fewer Canadian skiers headed to Vancouver". The Globe and Mail. CTV Olympics. Retrieved 2009.
  19. ^ "Olympic alpine team unveiled". CBC Sports. 27 January 2010. Retrieved 2010.
  20. ^ Campbell, Dean (29 January 2009). "Alpine Canada adds three to Olympic roster". CTV Olympics. Retrieved 2009.
  21. ^ Rindlisbacher, Tim (26 January 2010). "Skiers too often watch from the sidelines". National Post. Retrieved 2010.[dead link]
  22. ^ "Young guns make Canada's biathlon team". CTV Olympics. 28 January 2010. Retrieved 2010.
  23. ^ "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 20 September 2009. Retrieved 2009.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  24. ^ a b Lukas, Jennifer (27 January 2010). "Canada nominates Olympic bobsleigh, skeleton teams". CTV Olympics. Retrieved 2010.
  25. ^ a b Maki, Allan (22 January 2010). "Skier McKeever to make history at 2010 Games". CTV Olympics. Retrieved 2010.
  26. ^ Four more cross-country skiers join Canadian team for Vancouver Games, The Canadian Press, 27 January 2010.
  27. ^ a b Cross-country Schedule and Results, Vancouver 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games official website
  28. ^ "Who's heading to the Roar?". CTV Olympics. 20 April 2009. Retrieved 2009.
  29. ^ Rutherford, Kristina (13 November 2009). "Olympic champion Gushue ousted at Road to Roar". CTV Olympics. Retrieved 2009.
  30. ^ Graveland, Bill (13 December 2009). "Kevin Martin is headed to the Olympics". CTV Olympics. Retrieved 2009.
  31. ^ Weeks, Bob (12 December 2009). "Cheryl Bernard is going to the Olympics". CTV Olympics. Retrieved 2009.
  32. ^ Bisson, James (24 January 2010). "Omischl, Heil lead the way as freestyle team set". CTV Olympics. Retrieved 2010.
  33. ^ "Canuck breaks collarbone training". Toronto Sun. 19 February 2010. Retrieved 2010.
  34. ^ "Ski cross injury replacement goes down". Toronto Sun. 20 February 2010. Retrieved 2010.
  35. ^ Ewing, Lori (29 March 2009). "Three medals leaves Skate Canada optimistic". CTV Olympics. Retrieved 2009.
  36. ^ "International Skating Union Communication No. 1589: Olympic Winter Games 2010 - Entries/Participation Single & Pair Skatng [sic] And Ice Dance". International Skating Union. 28 September 2009. Archived from the original (PDF) on 4 October 2009. Retrieved 2009.
  37. ^ a b c d Lukas, Jennifer (17 January 2010). "Skate Canada names Olympic team". CTV Olympics. Retrieved 2010.
  38. ^ a b Brady, Rachel; Jennifer Lukas (16 January 2010). "Skate Canada reveals 4 Olympic entries". CTV Olympics. Retrieved 2010.
  39. ^ a b Craig, Lindsey (16 January 2010). "Dubé, Davison dazzle in pairs event, defend title". CBC Sports. Retrieved 2010.
  40. ^ Rosen, Dan (12 February 2009). "Yzerman has plan in place for Team Canada". National Hockey League. Retrieved 2009.
  41. ^ "Germany, Norway round out 2010 Olympic men's hockey". The Sports Network. 8 February 2009. Archived from the original on 13 February 2009. Retrieved 2009.
  42. ^ "The roster is set: Meet Team Canada". CTV Olympics. 30 December 2009. Retrieved 2009.
  43. ^ "Hockey Canada selects Dec. 31 to name Olympic team". CTV Olympics. 4 November 2009. Retrieved 2009.
  44. ^ "Babcock 'thrilled, honoured and humbled'". CTV Olympics. 25 June 2009. Retrieved 2009.
  45. ^ "Men's Ice Hockey: Team Canada Tournamement Standings and Statistics". International Olympic Committee.[dead link]
  46. ^ https://www.tsn.ca/story/?id=310072
  47. ^ "Davidson's tough choices could pay off for Canada". The Globe and Mail. 17 March 2009. Retrieved 2009.
  48. ^ "Canadian women cut two Olympic hockey hopefuls". CTV Olympics. 25 November 2009. Retrieved 2009.
  49. ^ Spencer, Donna (21 December 2009). "Women's Olympic hockey team unveiled". CTV Olympics.
  50. ^ "Olympic centralization roster". Hockey Canada. Retrieved 2009.
  51. ^ CANADA ROSTER - 2010 OLYMPIC WINTER GAMES, Hockey Canada, 21 December 2009.
  52. ^ "Canada's Olympic luge team veteran-filled". CTV Olympics. 19 December 2009. Retrieved 2009.
  53. ^ Rutherford, Kristina (9 February 2010). "Canada's luge team gets a million dollar offer". CTV Olympics. Retrieved 2010.
  54. ^ Campbell, Dean (25 January 2010). "Myslicki to hit his second Olympic Games". CTV Olympics. Retrieved 2010.
  55. ^ "Year in review: Short track speed skating". CTV Olympics. 13 May 2009. Retrieved 2009.
  56. ^ "Charles Hamelin is Vancouver-bound". CTV Olympics. 8 March 2009. Retrieved 2009.
  57. ^ "Gregg, St. Gelais and Vicent book spots on Canada's 2010 speedskating team". CTV Olympics. 18 August 2009. Retrieved 2009.
  58. ^ Rook, Katie (16 August 2009). "Roberge and Jean chosen for 2010 short track team". CTV Olympics. Retrieved 2009.
  59. ^ a b Maki, Allan (26 August 2009). "Olympic team mixes young and old". CTV Olympics. Retrieved 2009.
  60. ^ https://www.google.com/hostednews/canadianpress/article/ALeqM5gwUTsZs55rFq-vb_StHEqvsaKM0A
  61. ^ Knowles, Lori (20 January 2009). "Jasey-Jay Anderson Wins World Snowboarding Championship". SkiPressWorld. Archived from the original on 19 July 2011. Retrieved 2009.
  62. ^ "Canada's Olympic snowboard team set". CTV Olympics. 25 January 2010. Retrieved 2010.
  63. ^ "Wotherspoon qualifies for Olympics". CBC Sports. 27 December 2009. Retrieved 2009.
  64. ^ "Canada names its Olympic long track team". CTV Olympics. 11 January 2010. Retrieved 2010.

External links


  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

Canada_at_the_2010_Winter_Olympics
 



 



 
Music Scenes