Brick, New Jersey
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Brick, New Jersey

Brick Township, New Jersey
Township of Brick
Damage from Hurricane Sandy on the township's barrier island portion
Damage from Hurricane Sandy on the township's barrier island portion
Nickname(s): 
Bricktown
Map of Brick Township in Ocean County. Inset: Location of Ocean County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Brick Township in Ocean County. Inset: Location of Ocean County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Brick Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Brick Township, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°03?42?N 74°06?35?W / 40.061736°N 74.10962°W / 40.061736; -74.10962Coordinates: 40°03?42?N 74°06?35?W / 40.061736°N 74.10962°W / 40.061736; -74.10962[1][2]
Country
State New Jersey
County Ocean
IncorporatedFebruary 15, 1850
Named forJoseph W. Brick
Government
 o TypeFaulkner Act (mayor-council)
 o BodyTownship Council
 o MayorJohn G. Ducey (D, term ends December 31, 2021)[3][4]
 o AdministratorJoanne Bergin[5]
 o Municipal clerkLynnette A. Iannarone[6]
Area
 o Total32.22 sq mi (83.44 km2)
 o Land25.61 sq mi (66.34 km2)
 o Water6.61 sq mi (17.11 km2)  20.50%
Area rank77th of 565 in state
11th of 33 in county[1]
Elevation16 ft (5 m)
Population
 o Total75,072
 o Estimate 
(2019)[13]
76,100
 o Rank13th of 566 in state
3rd of 33 in county[14]
 o Density2,919.4/sq mi (1,127.2/km2)
 o Density rank218th of 566 in state
9th of 33 in county[14]
Time zoneUTC-05:00 (Eastern (EST))
 o Summer (DST)UTC-04:00 (Eastern (EDT))
ZIP Codes
08723-08724[15][16]
Area code(s)732[17]
FIPS code3402907420[1][18][19]
GNIS feature ID0882075[1][20]
Websitewww.twp.brick.nj.us

Brick Township is a township in Ocean County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township had a population of 75,072,[9][11][12] making it the state's 13th-largest municipality and the third most populous municipality in Ocean County (behind Lakewood Township and Toms River Township), having seen a decline of 1,047 residents (-1.4%) from its population of 76,119 in the 2000 Census, when it was the state's 12th most-populous municipality.[21][10]

While the majority of Brick Township is located on the mainland, Ocean Beaches I, II and III are situated on the Barnegat Peninsula, a long, narrow barrier peninsula that separates Barnegat Bay from the Atlantic Ocean.[22] The mainland and beach area of the town are not geographically adjacent. Brick Township was incorporated as a township by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on February 15, 1850, from portions of both Dover Township (now Toms River Township) and Howell Township. The township was named after Joseph Brick, the owner of Bergen Iron Works located on the Metedeconk River.[23][24] Portions of the township were taken to form Point Pleasant Beach (May 18, 1886), Bay Head (June 15, 1886), Lakewood Township (March 23, 1892), Mantoloking (April 10, 1911) and Point Pleasant (April 21, 1920).[25] In 1963, voters rejected a referendum that would have changed the township's name to "Laurelton".[26]

The Havens Homestead Museum is dedicated to the Havens family that originally settled in the Laurelton/Burrsville section of Brick. The museum is the original Havens home which lies on a small plot of farmland. The museum has a gift shop and runs tours of the property daily.[27]

After hovering for years in the top five, in 2006, the township earned the title of "America's Safest City", out of 371 cities included nationwide in the 13th annual Morgan Quitno survey.[28] Since the year 2000, Brick Township has been the safest "city" (population over 75,000) in New Jersey. In 2003 and 2004, Brick Township was ranked as the second safest city in the United States, after Newton, Massachusetts.[29] In 2005, Brick Township had dropped down to the fifth safest "city" (population over 75,000) in the United States, before it rebounded to the top in 2006.[30] In 2009, Brick Township ranked No. 6 on Newsmax magazine's list of the "Top 25 Most Uniquely American Cities and Towns," a piece written by current CBS News travel editor Peter Greenberg. In determining his ranking, Greenberg cited Brick's consistent nod as a safe city and that its "commercial development of big-box stores, department stores, and chain restaurants has made it a shopping destination for much of northern Ocean County."[31]

Brick Township has also been in the news for a claimed autism epidemic, in which 40 children out of over 6,000 surveyed were found to be autistic, though Brick's autism rate is statistically near the national average. Many of the children found to be autistic were born in Northern New Jersey and other parts of the country. There is no evidence that the levels of autism are linked to any specific environmental factor in Brick.[32] Parents of children diagnosed with autism have moved to the township in order to make use of the special education programs offered by the school district.[33]

Brick has also been home to the heroin epidemic. According to the state's statistics, in 2012 Brick was ranked sixth in the state with 550 reported incidents of heroin or opiate abuse, behind Newark, Jersey City, Paterson, Atlantic City and Camden. In 2017, Brick improved to 438 reported heroin abuse cases, ranked ninth in the state.[34]

During the December 2010 North American blizzard, Brick Township received 30 inches (760 mm) of snow, the highest accumulation recorded in the state.[35][36] In October 2012, parts of Brick were devastated by Hurricane Sandy. Barrier island and other waterfront properties were particularly hard hit. Homes and such buildings as the Shore Acres Yacht Club sustained major damage; some buildings had to be demolished.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 32.22 square miles (83.44 km2), including 25.61 square miles (66.34 km2) of land and 6.61 square miles (17.11 km2) of water (20.50%).[1][2]

Unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Adamston, Arrowhead Village, Breton Woods, Burrsville, Cedar Bridge, CedarCroft, Cedarwood Park, Cherry Quay, Greenbriar, Havens Cove, Havens Point, Herbertsville, Herring Island, Lanes Mills, Laurelton, Mandalay Park, Mardells Neck, Metedeconk, Metedeconk Neck, Osbornville, Playground Beach, Riviera Beach, Seaweed Point, Shore Acres, Sloop Point, Swan Point, West Mantoloking and West Osbornville.[37]

The communities of Herbertsville and Parkway Pines are located close to exit 91 of the Garden State Parkway, near the Monmouth County border, and are geographically distant from the rest of the township.[] Bayberry Court and Maypink Lane are two streets that are not accessible from any other Brick roads, and are served by the United States Postal Service as ZIP Code 07731 with Howell Township.[]

The township borders Bay Head, Lakewood Township, Mantoloking, Point Pleasant and Toms River Township in Ocean County; and the Monmouth County municipalities of Brielle, Howell Township and Wall Township.[38][39][40]

Demographics

2010 Census

The 2010 United States Census counted 75,072 people, 29,842 households, and 20,173 families in the township. The population density was 2,919.4 per square mile (1,127.2/km2). There were 33,677 housing units at an average density of 1,309.6 per square mile (505.6/km2). The racial makeup was 93.05% (69,856) White, 2.00% (1,502) Black or African American, 0.14% (104) Native American, 1.56% (1,173) Asian, 0.04% (27) Pacific Islander, 1.80% (1,350) from other races, and 1.41% (1,060) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 7.06% (5,301) of the population.[9]

Of the 29,842 households, 27.3% had children under the age of 18; 52.6% were married couples living together; 10.9% had a female householder with no husband present and 32.4% were non-families. Of all households, 27.2% were made up of individuals and 13.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.49 and the average family size was 3.05.[9]

20.7% of the population were under the age of 18, 7.6% from 18 to 24, 23.8% from 25 to 44, 29.9% from 45 to 64, and 17.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43.6 years. For every 100 females, the population had 91.0 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and older there were 87.6 males.[9]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $65,129 (with a margin of error of +/- $2,969) and the median family income was $81,868 (+/- $2,081). Males had a median income of $60,769 (+/- $1,755) versus $41,361 (+/- $1,655) for females. The per capita income for the township was $33,258 (+/- $891). About 4.1% of families and 5.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 8.1% of those under age 18 and 5.9% of those age 65 or over.[54]

2000 Census

As of the 2000 United States Census[18] there were 76,119 people, 29,511 households, and 20,775 families residing in the township. The population density was 2,901.5 people per square mile (1,120.5/km2). There were 32,689 housing units at an average density of 1,246.0 per square mile (481.2/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 95.81% White, 0.99% African American, 0.10% Native American, 1.19% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.85% from other races, and 1.04% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any nationality were 3.85% of the population.[52][53]

There were 29,511 households, out of which 31.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.8% were married couples living together, 10.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.6% were non-families. Of all households, 25.0% were made up of individuals, and 12.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.56 and the average family size was 3.07.[52][53]

In the township the population was spread out, with 23.8% under the age of 18, 6.4% from 18 to 24, 29.5% from 25 to 44, 23.3% from 45 to 64, and 17.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females, there were 90.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 86.8 males.[52][53]

The median income for a household in the township was $52,092, and the median income for a family was $61,446. Males had a median income of $44,981 versus $31,020 for females. The per capita income for the township was $24,462. About 3.1% of families and 4.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 5.8% of those under age 18 and 5.0% of those age 65 or over.[52][53]

Sports

The Brick Pop Warner Little Scholars Mustangs finished the 2006 season with a perfect 9-0 record and won the Jersey Shore B Division.[55]

In 2003, and from 2006 to 2009, the Pop Warner Brick Mustang cheerleaders competed against other teams from across the nation in Disney World.[] In 2003, the junior peewee Mustang cheer squad won the national title.[56]

Brick is home of the Ocean Ice Palace, built in 1960, which hosts the Brick Hockey Club.[57] The ice rink is also home to the Brick Stars, a special needs hockey team who has home games and practices.[58]

Parks and recreation

Brick Township Reservoir, with parts located in both Brick and Wall Township, covers 80 acres (32 ha) and is encircled by a 1.7-mile (2.7 km) trail. Fishing is permitted on the reservoir. The reservoir can hold up to 1,000,000,000 US gallons (3.8×109 l; 830,000,000 imp gal) of water, which is pumped in from the Metedeconk River.[59] The township also maintains nearly a dozen community parks, a multi-sports facility at the Drum Point Sports Complex and three oceanfront beaches as well as Windward Beach Park on the Metedeconk River.[60]

Government

Local government

The township operates within the Faulkner Act (formally known as the Optional Municipal Charter Law) under the Mayor-Council plan 2 form of government, as implemented on January 1, 1990, based on direct petition.[61] The township is one of 71 municipalities (of the 565) statewide that use this form of government.[62] The governing body is comprised of the Mayor and the seven-member Township Council, whose members are elected to serve four-year terms of office, with either three seats (and the mayoral seat) or four seats up for election at-large in partisan elections held on a staggered basis in odd-numbered years as part of the November general election.[7] The mayor is elected for a four-year term without limitation as to the number of terms. In November 1988, the voters approved a referendum which returned the township to the partisan system of government, with township elections held as part of the November general election (rather than in May).[63]

The mayor is the township's chief executive and administrative officer and is responsible for administering local laws and policy development. The mayor makes various appointments, prepares the township's budget, and approves or vetoes ordinances adopted by the Township Council (which may be overridden by a 2/3 vote of the Township Council). The mayor appoints, with the advice and consent of the Township Council, the business administrator, the township attorney, and the directors of the Departments of Public Safety, Engineering and Public Works.[3]

As of 2020, the mayor of Brick Township is Democrat John G. Ducey, whose term of office ends on December 31, 2021.[3] Members of the Township Council are Council President Lisa Crate (D, 2023), Council Vice President Arthur Halloran (D, 2023), Heather deJong (D, 2021), Vincent Minichino (D, 2023), Paul Mummolo (D, 2021), Marianna Pontoriero (D, 2021) and Andrea Zapcic (D, 2023).[64][65][66][67][68][69][70]

In January 2014, the Township Council appointed Andrea Zapcic to fill the vacant council seat expiring in December 2015 of John G. Ducey after he took office as mayor.[71][72] Zapcic won election in November 2014 to serve the balance of the term.[73]

Ducey was elected as mayor in 2013, garnering 62% of the vote to defeat Republican opponent Joseph Sangiovanni.[74]

Former Mayor Joseph C. Scarpelli resigned as of December 8, 2006, amid a federal corruption probe into township government. On January 8, 2007, Scarpelli pleaded guilty to federal bribery charges for accepting money from developers in exchange for using his official position to obtain approval for development projects.[75] Township Clerk Virginia Lampman was appointed to fill the role of mayor until the Township Council could select a replacement.[76][77] On December 17, 2007, former Scarpelli was sentenced in Federal Court in Newark to serve 18 months in prison and was fined $5,000, after admitting that he had accepted bribes from 1998 to 2003.[78]

On January 4, 2007, Daniel J. Kelly (D), the Township's Planning Board chairman, was appointed the new mayor by a three-member township council subcommittee.[79] On November 6, 2007, Stephen C. Acropolis defeated Kelly in a race to fill the remaining two years of Scarpelli's term.[80]

Federal, state, and county representation

Brick Township is located in the 3rd Congressional District[81] and is part of New Jersey's 10th state legislative district.[11][82][83] Prior to the 2010 Census, Brick Township had been part of the 4th Congressional District, a change made by the New Jersey Redistricting Commission that took effect in January 2013, based on the results of the November 2012 general elections.[84]

For the 116th United States Congress, New Jersey's 3rd Congressional District is represented by Andy Kim (D, Bordentown).[85] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Democrats Cory Booker (Newark, term ends 2021)[86] and Bob Menendez (Paramus, term ends 2025).[87][88]

For the 2020-2021 session (Senate, General Assembly), the 10th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by James W. Holzapfel (R, Toms River) and in the General Assembly by John Catalano (R, Brick Township) and Gregory P. McGuckin (R, Toms River).[89][90]

Ocean County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders consisting of five members, elected on an at-large basis in partisan elections and serving staggered three-year terms of office, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year as part of the November general election.[91] At an annual reorganization held in the beginning of January, the board chooses a Director and a Deputy Director from among its members. As of 2019, Ocean County's Freeholders (with party affiliation, term-end year, residence and department directorship listed in parentheses) are Freeholder Director Virginia E. Haines (R, 2019, Toms River; Parks and Recreation and Natural Lands),[92] Freeholder Deputy Director John P. Kelly (R, 2019, Eagleswood Township; Law and Public Safety),[93] Gerry P. Little (R, 2021, Surf City; Roads),[94] Gary Quinn (R, 2021, Lacey Township; Human Services and Transportation)[95] and Joseph H. Vicari (R, 2020, Toms River; Senior Services and County Operations).[96][97][98] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Scott M. Colabella (R, 2019, Barnegat Light),[99][100] Sheriff Michael Mastronardy (R, 2019; Toms River)[101] and Surrogate Jeffrey Moran (R, 2023, Beachwood).[102][103]

Politics

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 48,760 registered voters in Brick Township, of which 9,992 (20.5%) were registered as Democrats, 12,206 (25.0%) were registered as Republicans and 26,528 (54.4%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 34 voters registered to other parties.[104] Among the township's 2010 Census population, 65.0% (vs. 63.2% in Ocean County) were registered to vote, including 81.9% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 82.6% countywide).[104][105]

In the 2012 presidential election, Republican Mitt Romney received 55.9% of the vote (18,484 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 42.9% (14,184 votes), and other candidates with 1.2% (387 votes), among the 33,328 ballots cast by the township's 51,117 registered voters (273 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 65.2%.[106][107] In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 58.1% of the vote (21,912 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 39.9% (15,031 votes) and other candidates with 1.3% (489 votes), among the 37,704 ballots cast by the township's 50,742 registered voters, for a turnout of 74.3%.[108] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 60.9% of the vote (21,888 ballots cast), outpolling Democrat John Kerry with 37.8% (13,596 votes) and other candidates with 0.8% (363 votes), among the 35,954 ballots cast by the township's 48,235 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 74.5.[109]

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 74.4% of the vote (17,331 cast), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 24.2% (5,633 votes), and other candidates with 1.4% (332 votes), among the 23,830 ballots cast by the township's 50,398 registered voters (534 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 47.3%.[110][111] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 67.3% of the vote (17,822 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 25.2% (6,675 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 5.0% (1,336 votes) and other candidates with 1.0% (272 votes), among the 26,479 ballots cast by the township's 49,529 registered voters, yielding a 53.5% turnout.[112]

Education

The Brick Public Schools serve students in pre-kindergarten through twelfth grade.[113] As of the 2017-18 school year, the district, comprised of 12 schools, had an enrollment of 8,809 students and 758.7 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student-teacher ratio of 11.6:1.[114] Schools in the district (with 2017-18 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[115]) are Drum Point Elementary School[116] (428; K-5), Herbertsville Elementary School[117] (239; K-5), Lanes Mill Elementary School[118] (559; K-5), Midstreams Elementary School[119] (473; K-5), Osborneville Elementary School[120] (395; K-5), Veterans Memorial Elementary School[121] (636; K-5), Warren H. Wolf Preschool[122] (333; PreK-3; created for 2014-15 school year from Primary Learning Center[123]), Emma Havens Young Elementary School[124] (754; K-5), Lake Riviera Middle School[125] (943; 6-8) Veterans Memorial Middle School[126] (1,105; 6-8), Brick Memorial High School[127] (1,346; 9-12) and Brick Township High School[128] (1,513; 9-12).[129][130]

Nonsectarian private schools include Cuddle Care Early Childhood Center and Ocean Early Childhood Center. St. Dominic Elementary School is a Roman Catholic private school overseen by the Roman Catholic Diocese of Trenton,[131] and St. Paul's Christian School, a Methodist private school, serve students in nursery through eighth grade.[132]

Transportation

The northbound Garden State Parkway in Brick Township

Roads and highways

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 318.77 miles (513.01 km) of roadways, of which 256.23 miles (412.36 km) were maintained by the municipality, 46.64 miles (75.06 km) by Ocean County and 12.61 miles (20.29 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation and 3.29 miles (5.29 km) by the New Jersey Turnpike Authority.[133]

The Garden State Parkway is the most prominent highway passing through Brick. It traverses the western part of the municipality with three interchanges: Exits 91, 90, and 89. Three state routes also pass through: Route 70 Route 88, and Route 35. The major county routes that pass through are CR 528, and CR 549 (as well as its spur).

The Laurelton Circle was located near the center of Brick Township. The traffic circle was at the junction of Route 70, Route 88 and Princeton Avenue. It was converted to a traffic light regulated intersection in 1986, due to an increase in traffic and accidents. To reduce the need for left turns, a short portion of eastbound Route 88 was re-routed onto Princeton Avenue. Some other movements are controlled by jughandles and a two-way connection in the northwest corner.[134]

Public transportation

NJ Transit offers bus service between the township and the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Midtown Manhattan on the 137 route, to Philadelphia on the 317 and to Newark on the 67.[135] Ocean Ride service is provided on route 3, 3A and 4.[136]

The First Baptist Church of Laurelton in Brick located on Rt. 88
The historical plaque that adorns the church's lawn

Media

WBGD 91.9FM (Brick Green Dragons) went on the air in 1974, originally located at Brick Township High School. The station was later moved to Brick Memorial High School. The radio station was the brainchild of a teacher named Robert Boesch who taught electronics at Brick Township High School in the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s. The station was a student-run operation and received its FCC license from the FCC for Educational Broadcasting.

One of the most notable broadcasts was the first ever state high school football championship game played between Brick Township High School and Camden High School in December 1974. The Brick Green Dragons defeated Camden by a score of 21-20 on the last play of the game to win the title.

In 2007, during routine roof maintenance and repair work, the broadcast tower was cut off the roof, and was never replaced or repaired. In 2010 WBGD's license was retired.

The Asbury Park Press provides daily news coverage of the township, as does WOBM-FM radio. The government of the township provides material and commentary to The Brick Times, which is one of seven weekly papers from Micromedia Publications.[137]

Climate

According to the Köppen climate classification system, Brick Township, New Jersey has a humid subtropical climate (Cfa). Cfa climates are characterized by all months having an average mean temperature > 32.0 °F (> 0.0 °C), at least four months with an average mean temperature >= 50.0 °F (>= 10.0 °C), at least one month with an average mean temperature >= 71.6 °F (>= 22.0 °C) and no significant precipitation difference between seasons. During the summer months in Brick Township, a cooling afternoon sea breeze is present on most days, but episodes of extreme heat and humidity can occur with heat index values >= 95 °F (>= 35 °C). On average, the wettest month of the year is July which corresponds with the annual peak in thunderstorm activity. During the winter months, episodes of extreme cold and wind can occur with wind chill values < 0 °F (< -18 °C). The plant hardiness zone at Brick Township Beach is 7a with an average annual extreme minimum air temperature of 3.4 °F (-15.9 °C).[138] The average seasonal (November-April) snowfall total is between 18 to 24 inches (46 to 61 cm) and the average snowiest month is February which corresponds with the annual peak in nor'easter activity.

Climate data for Brick Twp Beach, NJ (1981-2010 Averages)
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °F (°C) 40.2
(4.6)
42.7
(5.9)
49.6
(9.8)
59.1
(15.1)
68.9
(20.5)
78.1
(25.6)
83.3
(28.5)
82.2
(27.9)
76.0
(24.4)
65.5
(18.6)
55.2
(12.9)
45.1
(7.3)
62.3
(16.8)
Daily mean °F (°C) 32.6
(0.3)
34.7
(1.5)
41.2
(5.1)
50.4
(10.2)
60.1
(15.6)
69.6
(20.9)
75.0
(23.9)
74.0
(23.3)
67.4
(19.7)
56.2
(13.4)
47.0
(8.3)
37.4
(3.0)
53.9
(12.2)
Average low °F (°C) 25.1
(-3.8)
26.7
(-2.9)
32.8
(0.4)
41.6
(5.3)
51.3
(10.7)
61.0
(16.1)
66.7
(19.3)
65.8
(18.8)
58.7
(14.8)
47.0
(8.3)
38.8
(3.8)
29.6
(-1.3)
45.5
(7.5)
Average precipitation inches (mm) 3.66
(93)
3.07
(78)
4.22
(107)
3.94
(100)
3.53
(90)
3.68
(93)
4.61
(117)
4.47
(114)
3.51
(89)
3.74
(95)
3.90
(99)
3.97
(101)
46.30
(1,176)
Average relative humidity (%) 65.2 62.8 60.6 62.3 66.0 70.3 69.6 71.2 71.3 69.9 68.3 66.3 67.0
Average dew point °F (°C) 22.2
(-5.4)
23.3
(-4.8)
28.6
(-1.9)
38.0
(3.3)
48.7
(9.3)
59.5
(15.3)
64.4
(18.0)
64.1
(17.8)
57.8
(14.3)
46.5
(8.1)
37.1
(2.8)
27.2
(-2.7)
43.2
(6.2)
Source: PRISM[139]
Climate data for Sandy Hook, NJ Ocean Water Temperature (30 N Brick Township)
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Daily mean °F (°C) 37
(3)
36
(2)
40
(4)
46
(8)
55
(13)
62
(17)
69
(21)
72
(22)
68
(20)
59
(15)
51
(11)
43
(6)
53
(12)
Source: NOAA[140]

Ecology

According to the A. W. Kuchler U.S. potential natural vegetation types, Brick Township, New Jersey would have two classifications; 1) a dominant vegetation type of Northeastern Oak/Pine (110) with a dominant vegetation form of Southern Mixed Forest (26) just inland from the bays and rivers, and 2) a dominant vegetation type of Northern Cordgrass (73) with a dominant vegetation form of Coastal Prairie (20) on the barrier island and near the bays and rivers.[141]

Notable people

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Brick Township include:

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f 2019 Census Gazetteer Files: New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 1, 2020.
  2. ^ a b US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  3. ^ a b c Mayor's Office, Township of Brick. Accessed March 16, 2020.
  4. ^ 2020 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed February 1, 2020.
  5. ^ Business Administrator, Township of Brick. Accessed March 16, 2020.
  6. ^ Township Clerk and Vital Statistics, Township of Brick. Accessed March 16, 2020.
  7. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 53.
  8. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Brick, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 4, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Brick township, Ocean County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed January 22, 2012.
  10. ^ a b The Counties and Most Populous Cities and Townships in 2010 in New Jersey: 2000 and 2010 Archived October 20, 2013, at the Wayback Machine, United States Census Bureau. Accessed March 15, 2012.
  11. ^ a b c d Municipalities Sorted by 2011-2020 Legislative District, New Jersey Department of State. Accessed February 1, 2020.
  12. ^ a b c Table DP-1. Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Brick township, Ocean County, New Jersey Archived 2014-08-10 at the Wayback Machine, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed January 22, 2012.
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  22. ^ Cullinane, Bob. "Brick Beaches", Asbury Park Press, July 28, 2002. Accessed January 22, 2012. ""There are three public access beaches in Brick (Ocean Beach I, Ocean Beach II, Ocean Beach III) that, in total, cover about a half-mile. These should not be confused with Ocean Beach, a section of Dover Township, just south of Brick's Ocean Beaches. Got it?"
  23. ^ Donatiello, Gene. "Who is Joseph Woolston Brick?", Brick Township Historical Society. Accessed February 19, 2013. "The new township was named after its most prominent citizen Joseph Woolston Brick. Joseph W. Brick was the industrious and successful owner of Bergen Iron Works."
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  26. ^ Wright, George Cable. "Jersey Aroused By Referendums; Some Ballots on Tuesday to List Nine Questions", The New York Times, November 3, 1963. Accessed July 5, 2012. "Brick Township will become Laurelton, as it was known in 1904, if a local referendum is adopted. The change to Brick was made just before the Civil War when bricklayers formed an influential segment of the local population."
  27. ^ Henry Harry "Clay" Havens, Brick Township Historical Society. Accessed January 22, 2013.
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  33. ^ Nee, Daniel. "As Federal Report on Autism is Released, Brick School Officials Wish Funding Promises Were Kept" Archived 2011-12-10 at the Wayback Machine, January 24, 2011. Accessed January 20, 2013. "Still, Hrycenko and Magovern agreed that the noted program in Brick is necessary, despite a lack of assistance from outside sources. 'There's no doubt about it,' said Magovern. 'Especially in the autistic population, a lot of people move here because we provide those services in the district.'"
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  36. ^ O'Reilly, David; Katz, Matt; and Simon, Darran. "Not a blizzard, but snowfall was one for the books", The Philadelphia Inquirer, December 28, 2010. Accessed February 6, 2013. "Coming in from the south on winds that gusted as high as 62 m.p.h. at Wilmington's airport, the storm left accumulations of just two to six inches to the north of the city, but dropped 26 inches on parts of Cape May County, piled 30 inches on Brick Township, Ocean County, and paralyzed New York City and much of New England."
  37. ^ Locality Search, State of New Jersey. Accessed May 21, 2015.
  38. ^ Areas touching Brick Township, MapIt. Accessed March 16, 2020.
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  55. ^ Brick Dragon "Pee Wee team wins division title" Archived November 5, 2006, at the Wayback Machine, Brick Township Bulletin, October 26, 2006.
  56. ^ Erickson, Stephanie. "Gooooooo, Clermont! Cheer Team Earns Kudos", Orlando Sentinel, December 12, 2003. Accessed January 22, 2012. "The Cheer & Dance Championships consist of 160 small and large squads competing in four age classifications. Taking first place in the junior peewee small division were the Brick Memorial Mustangs from Brick, N.J."
  57. ^ Miller, Patricia A. "Township to buy Ocean Ice Palace for $5M; Building, 13.3-acre site to be used as new community center" Archived 2014-07-19 at the Wayback Machine, Brick Township Bulletin, July 26, 2007. Accessed September 18, 2013.
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  63. ^ Saverino v. Zboyan, Leagle, Superior Court of New Jersey, Appellate Division. Decided March 13, 1990. Accessed June 26, 2015. "During 1987-1988, a movement was initiated in the township seeking a modification of the charter to provide for partisan elections, rather than non-partisan, to be conducted in November, rather than May. A petition of approximately 2,697 voters was presented to the governing body, which adopted an ordinance presenting the proposed modification to the voters under the initiative and referendum section of the act, N.J.S.A. 40:69A-184.... In the November 1988 referendum, the voters adopted the modification."
  64. ^ 2020 Township Council, Brick Township. Accessed March 16, 2020.
  65. ^ 2019 Municipal Data Sheet, Brick Township. Accessed March 16, 2020.
  66. ^ 2020 Ocean County & Municipal Elected Officials, Ocean County, New Jersey Clerk, updated February 6, 2020. Accessed March 16, 2020.
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  68. ^ 2019 General Election Official Results November 5, 2019, Ocean County, New Jersey Clerk, updated November 15, 2019. Accessed January 1, 2020.
  69. ^ 2018 General Election Official Results November 6, 2018, Ocean County, New Jersey Clerk, updated November 19, 2018. Accessed January 1, 2019.
  70. ^ 2017 General Election Official Results November 7, 2017, Ocean County, New Jersey Clerk, updated November 15, 2017. Accessed January 1, 2018.
  71. ^ Huba, Nicholas. "Andrea Zapcic is new Brick council memberFormer head of local recreation department takes mayor's old spot", Asbury Park Press, January 30, 2014. Accessed August 9, 2015. "Andrea Zapcic, 56, was sworn in Tuesday night as a councilwoman. Ducey, a Democrat, resigned from his council seat after being sworn in as mayor."
  72. ^ Galioto, Catherine. "Former Brick Rec Director Sworn In to Fill Ducey's Council Seat", Brick Patch, January 29, 2014. Accessed August 9, 2015. "Andrea Zapcic is Brick Township's newest council member, picked to fill the seat vacated by Mayor John G. Ducey.... Zapcic was the choice picked by the local Democratic committee, after the vacancy created by Ducey's election to mayor."
  73. ^ General Election November 4, 2014, Ocean County, New Jersey Clerk, updated November 12, 2014. Accessed July 26, 2016.
  74. ^ General Election November 5, 2013, Ocean County, New Jersey Clerk, updated November 14, 2013. Accessed July 26, 2016.
  75. ^ Restoring trust in government challenge for Brick officials, Asbury Park Press, January 10, 2007.
  76. ^ Brick mayor resigns; township clerk to become new mayor, Asbury Park Press, December 6, 2006.
  77. ^ "New Jersey: Brick Township: Mayor Resigns", The New York Times, December 8, 2006.
  78. ^ Rundquist, Jeanette. "Former Brick mayor sentenced to 18 months", The Star-Ledger, December 17, 2007. Accessed January 22, 2012. "Former Brick Township Mayor Joseph Scarpelli was sentenced to 18 months in federal prison today, and fined $5,000, for taking bribes in exchange for helping a developer gain approval for construction projects. Scarpelli, 68, who in January admitted taking more than $5,000 in bribes, was sentenced in District Court in Newark in front of about a dozen family and friends, including four grown children."
  79. ^ Kelly is appointed as mayor in Brick, The Asbury Park Press, January 5, 2007.
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  85. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 3, 2019.
  86. ^ About Cory Booker, United States Senate. Accessed January 26, 2015. "He now owns a home and lives in Newark's Central Ward community."
  87. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate, January 26, 2015. "He currently lives in Paramus and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  88. ^ Senators of the 116th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed April 17, 2019. "Booker, Cory A. - (D - NJ) Class II; Menendez, Robert - (D - NJ) Class I"
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  90. ^ District 10 Legislators, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 15, 2020.
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  94. ^ Freeholder Gerry P. Little, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 25, 2015.
  95. ^ Freeholder Gary Quinn, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 4, 2019.
  96. ^ Freeholder Joseph H. Vicari, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 25, 2015.
  97. ^ Board of Chosen Freeholders, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 25, 2015.
  98. ^ County Directory, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 25, 2015.
  99. ^ County Clerk, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 25, 2015.
  100. ^ Biography of Scott M. Colabella, Office of the County Clerk. Accessed January 25, 2015.
  101. ^ Sheriff Michael Mastronardy, Ocean County Sheriff's Office. Accessed January 25, 2015.
  102. ^ County Surrogate Jeffrey W. Moran, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 25, 2015.
  103. ^ 2015 Elected Officials of Ocean County, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 25, 2015.
  104. ^ a b Voter Registration Summary - Ocean, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed December 25, 2012.
  105. ^ GCT-P7: Selected Age Groups: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision; 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey , United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 25, 2012.
  106. ^ "Presidential General Election Results - November 6, 2012 - Ocean County" (PDF). New Jersey Department of Elections. March 15, 2013. Retrieved 2014.
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  108. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Ocean County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed December 25, 2012.
  109. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Ocean County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed December 25, 2012.
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  113. ^ Brick Township Board of Education District Policy 9000 - Role of the Board of Education, Brick Public Schools. Accessed February 9, 2020. "The board of this district shall be known officially as the Board of Education of the Township of Brick in the County of Ocean. The Brick Township School District is comprised of all the area within the municipal boundaries of the Township of Brick for the purpose of providing a program of education in grades Pre-Kindergarten through grade 12."
  114. ^ District information for Brick Township Public School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed November 1, 2019.
  115. ^ School Data for the Brick Public Schools, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed November 1, 2019.
  116. ^ Drum Point Elementary School, Brick Township Schools. Accessed February 9, 2020.
  117. ^ Herbertsville Elementary School, Brick Township Schools. Accessed February 9, 2020.
  118. ^ Lanes Mill Elementary School, Brick Township Schools. Accessed February 9, 2020.
  119. ^ Midstreams Elementary School, Brick Township Schools. Accessed February 9, 2020.
  120. ^ Osborneville Elementary School, Brick Township Schools. Accessed February 9, 2020.
  121. ^ Veterans Memorial Elementary School, Brick Township Schools. Accessed February 9, 2020.
  122. ^ Warren H. Wolf Preschool, Brick Township Schools. Accessed February 9, 2020.
  123. ^ Huba, Nicholas. "Is there a new school planned for Brick?", Asbury Park Press, June 21, 2014. Accessed August 14, 2014. "In response, school district officials are transforming the Primary Learning Center from a prekindergarten-kindergarten facility into a kindergarten through fifth-grade elementary school, Superintendent Walter Uszenski said.The new school will be renamed Warren H. Wolf Elementary School in honor the former Brick Township High School football coach."
  124. ^ Emma Havens Young Elementary School, Brick Township Schools. Accessed February 9, 2020.
  125. ^ Lake Riviera Middle School, Brick Township Schools. Accessed February 9, 2020.
  126. ^ Veterans Memorial Middle School, Brick Township Schools. Accessed February 9, 2020.
  127. ^ Brick Memorial High School, Brick Township Schools. Accessed February 9, 2020.
  128. ^ Brick Township High School, Brick Township Schools. Accessed February 9, 2020.
  129. ^ Contact Us, Brick Public Schools. Accessed February 9, 2020.
  130. ^ New Jersey School Directory for Brick Public Schools, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed December 29, 2016.
  131. ^ Ocean County Catholic Schools Archived 2016-04-11 at the Wayback Machine, Roman Catholic Diocese of Trenton. Accessed January 22, 2017.
  132. ^ About Us Archived 2013-12-08 at the Wayback Machine, Saint Paul's Christian School. Accessed September 18, 2013.
  133. ^ Ocean County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed July 24, 2014.
  134. ^ Moore, Kirk. "History of Traffic Circles", Asbury Park Press, August 24, 2006. Accessed March 15, 2012.
  135. ^ Ocean County Bus / Rail Connections, NJ Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of February 20, 2012. Accessed January 22, 2012.
  136. ^ Ocean Ride Rider's Guide Archived June 27, 2015, at the Wayback Machine, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed August 9, 2015.
  137. ^ The Brick Times Archived 2016-08-03 at the Wayback Machine, Micromedia Publications. Accessed July 26, 2016. "First published in 2002. Serving Brick and Lakewood Townships in Ocean County, New Jersey"
  138. ^ "USDA Interactive Plant Hardiness Map". United States Department of Agriculture. Retrieved 2019.
  139. ^ "PRISM Climate Group, Oregon State University". Retrieved 2019.
  140. ^ "Water Temperature Table of All Coastal Regions". Retrieved 2019.
  141. ^ "U.S. Potential Natural Vegetation, Original Kuchler Types, v2.0 (Spatially Adjusted to Correct Geometric Distortions)". Retrieved 2019.
  142. ^ Simpson, Craig. "MoCo Gay Teacher Fired 1972; Justice Denied for 40 Years", Washington Area Spark, December 20, 2012. Accessed November 20, 2017. "Acanfora hadn't started at the University as an activist. He had graduated from Brick Township High School in New Jersey as class valedictorian in 1968 and entered Penn State in the fall on a Navy ROTC scholarship."
  143. ^ "Industry Magazine Feature - 'Catch A Wave'", JayAlder.com, July 6, 2015. Accessed August 7, 2016. "Although he enjoyed surfing among the dolphins and being inspired by the tropical beauty of Florida, Alders and his wife decided to return to Jersey in 2013 when Chelsea became pregnant with the couple's daughter, Summer Emerson, first settling in Belmar. The couple now resides in Brick with Summer (whose initials spell out S.E.A.), and newborn twins Greyson Dutch and Judah Kai."
  144. ^ Rich, Motoko. "Successful at 96, Writer Has More to Say", The New York Times, April 7, 2007. Accessed March 15, 2012. "Harry Bernstein at his home in Brick, NJ."
  145. ^ Goldstein, Richard. "Hank Borowy, 88, Top Pitcher With Yankees and Cubs in 40's", The New York Times, August 26, 2004. Accessed January 22, 2012. "Hank Borowy, a right-handed pitcher who helped the Yankees capture pennants in 1942 and 1943, then starred for the last Chicago Cubs team to reach the World Series, died Monday at his home in Brick, N.J. He was 88.... Borowy, a native of Bloomfield, N.J., who pitched for Fordham University, was 15-4 as a rookie on the Yankees' 1942 pennant winners."
  146. ^ Wildstein, David. "John Catalano elected to NJ State Assembly McGuckin wins fifth term in 10th district", New Jersey Globe, November 5, 2019. Accessed July 22, 2020. "The New Jersey Globe is projecting that Republican John Catalano, a former Brick councilman, has won an open seat in the New Jersey State Assembly."
  147. ^ Del Mastro, Rob. "Brick's Nick Catone a profile in courage", Asbury Park Press, May 19, 2004. Accessed January 6, 2011.
  148. ^ [https://web.archive.org/web/20070927153654/http://www.senatorciesla.com/biography.html Biography, Senator Ciesla. Accessed July 22, 2020. "Councilman, Brick Township, 1987 to 1991; Council President, Brick Township, 1989"
  149. ^ Chere, Rich. "Former New Jersey Devils center Jim Dowd cut by Flyers", The Star-Ledger, October 4, 2008. Accessed November 11, 2008. "Jim Dowd, the Brick native who attended the Philadelphia Flyers' training camp on a tryout contract, was cut by the team Saturday morning."
  150. ^ Sullivan, Joseph F. "Focus Is on a Few Close Races for New Jersey Legislature", The New York Times, November 1, 1991. Accessed March 24, 2016. "His longtime running mate in the 10th District in Ocean County, Assemblyman John Paul Doyle of Brick Township, has moved up to run for the Senate and is in tight race with Andrew R. Ciesla, a Councilman in Brick, who is running hard on the generic Republican campaign of opposition to the Florio tax package as well as Mr. Doyle's votes for the taxes."
  151. ^ A waterfront haven named for iron works owner Archived 2006-01-04 at Archive.today, Asbury Park Press, September 8, 2005.
  152. ^ Garrett Graham, Houston Texans. Accessed January 6, 2011.
  153. ^ Staff. "JACK MARTIN DEAD; OLDEST EX-YANKEE; Jerseyan, 93, Played at Shortstop for the Highlanders In 1912", The New York Times, July 6, 1980. Accessed December 2, 2008.
  154. ^ Tom McCarthy Archived 2007-09-27 at the Wayback Machine, WFAN. Accessed August 26, 2007. "A 1986 graduate of Brick Memorial High School and a 1990 graduate of TCNJ, Tom and his wife Meg have four children: Patrick (10), Tommy (8), Maggie (5) and Kerri (3), and live in Allentown, NJ."
  155. ^ Assemblyman Gregory P. McGuckin, New Jersey Senate Republicans. Accessed July 22, 2020. "Gregory P. McGuckin was born on July 2,1961 in East Orange, NJ. He grew up in Brick Township where his father served as Mayor in the late 1960's and early 1970's."
  156. ^ Din, Suleman E. (July 19, 2007). "McGuire sentenced to life in prison for suitcase murder". Star-Ledger Updates. Retrieved 2011.
  157. ^ Hevesi Dennis. "Eli Mintz, Stage and Film Actor And Uncle David in Goldbergs", The New York Times, June 9, 1988. Accessed July 22, 2020. "Eli Mintz, an actor who played the ever-philosophizing Uncle David in the stage, movie and television versions of The Goldbergs, died of pneumonia yesterday at Point Pleasant Hospital in New Jersey. He was 83 years old and lived in Brick, N.J."
  158. ^ Paolantonio, S.A. "Environmental Debate Engrosses Shore Voters", The Philadelphia Inquirer, September 26, 1989. Accessed March 24, 2016. "Daniel F. Newman, the mayor of Brick Township, pulls out a poster-sized aerial photograph of Toms River where it feeds Barnegat Bay, Ocean County's pristine inlet waterway stretching 45 miles along the Jersey shore."
  159. ^ Sherman, Ted. "A deadly fall: 46 years ago, a Jersey daredevil died while trying to set record", NJ Advance Media for NJ.com, October 12, 2012, updated March 30, 2019. Accessed July 22, 2020. "By now married with three young daughters and living in Brick, Piantanida made breaking the record an obsession, despite his lack of experience."
  160. ^ Adelizzi, Joe. "'Voice' of Rowan gets word out", Asbury Park Press, February 8, 2003. Accessed November 6, 2017. "John Sadak of Brick, who has won numerous awards during his tenure at Rowan University, is hoping to make broadcasting his career.... Sadak, who graduated from Brick Memorial High School in 1996, describes himself as a lifelong fan."
  161. ^ Betsy Sholl, Poets & Writers, updated April 28, 2014. Accessed July 22, 2020. "Born in: Lakewood; Raised in: Brick Town, NJ"
  162. ^ Obituary of George F. Tardiff, Legacy.com. Accessed January 16, 2020. "George F. Tardiff 'Coach', Brick, N.J. 75, passed away on Friday, September 21, 2012 at Ocean Medical Center at Brick, after a short illness."
  163. ^ Art Thoms player profile Archived 2007-02-09 at the Wayback Machine, database Football. Accessed August 11, 2007.
  164. ^ Art Thoms Archived 2007-09-30 at the Wayback Machine, Oakland Raiders. Accessed August 11, 2007. "I started playing football in high school. It was the freshman team at Wayne High School in Wayne, N.J. I played two years there and then my family moved to Brickjohn [sic], NJ. I played the last two years of high school ball there."
  165. ^ Scott Thomsen, Major League Soccer. Accessed July 26, 2016. "Raised in Brick, New Jersey, and attended Christian Brothers Academy in Lincroft, New Jersey, where he led CBA to unbeaten 21-0 season in 2011, scoring the game-winning goal in the Non-Public Group A state championship game while playing through injury and earning Central Jersey Player of the Year honors"
  166. ^ Skelly, Richard. "George Wirth's concert series returns to Keyport", Asbury Park Press, April 3, 2015. Accessed July 22, 2020. "Brick Township-based folk singer George Wirth has organized just such a night for us, on Saturday night, April 4, with help from his wife Brenda at Espresso Joe's coffee house in Keyport."
  167. ^ Wall, Karen E. "The gray ghost wishes he could be invisible" Archived 2005-12-25 at Archive.today, Asbury Park Press, November 18, 1999. "He also served as mayor of Brick from 1971-75, was an Ocean County freeholder from 1975-81, a state Assemblyman from 1981-83, and served on the Brick Township Council from 1982 until his defeat in the mayoral race in 1993."
  168. ^ Larsen, Erik. "Longtime NJ assemblyman from Brick will not seek re-election", Asbury Park Press, January 23, 2019. Accessed July 22, 2020. "Wolfe, 76, of Brick, represents the 10th Legislative District, which includes Bay Head, Brick, Island Heights, Lakehurst, Lavallette, Manchester, Mantoloking, Point Pleasant Beach, Seaside Heights and Toms River.... He was elected to the Brick Township Council in 1975 and served on that municipal body until his election to the Assembly in 1991."

External links

Preceded by
Mantoloking
Beaches of New Jersey Succeeded by
Dover Beaches North

  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

Brick,_New_Jersey
 



 



 
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