Bishop of Venafro
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Bishop of Venafro

The Diocese of Venafro was a Roman Catholic diocese in Italy, located in Venafro, province of Isernia, region of Molise in the ecclesiastical province of Capua. On 1852 June 19, the diocese was suppressed and its territory and Catholic population transferred to the care of the Diocese of Isernia-Venafro.[1][2]

History

Bishops

Diocese of Venafro

Erected: 1024

  • Constantinus (499)[3]
...
  • Rainaldus (15 February 1252 - ? )[4]
...
The list continues at the Diocese of Isernia-Venafro.

References

  1. ^ a b "Diocese of Venafro" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved March 21, 2016
  2. ^ a b "Diocese of Venafro" GCatholic.org. Gabriel Chow. Retrieved January 30, 2016
  3. ^ Constantinus received letters from Pope Gelasius I (in 496): P. Jaffe, Regesta pontificum Romanorum editio altera I (Leipzig 1885), p. 95. He was present at the Roman synod of Pope Symmachus in 499. J.D. Mansi (ed.), Sacrorum Conciliorum nova et amplissima collectio editio novissima Tomus 8 (Florence 1762), p. 235. Cappelletti, pp. 159-160.
  4. ^ Rainaldus had been archbishop-elect of Capua: Eubel, I, p. 518.
  5. ^ Joannes had previously been Canon of Valva and Bishop of Amelia (1327-1328): Eubel, I, p. 85.
  6. ^ Gams, p. 939.
  7. ^ Guido had previously been Bishop of Troja. Eubel, I, p. 499, 519 note 11.
  8. ^ Petrus was appointed by Clement VII of the Avignon Obedience.
  9. ^ Archamono was appointed by Clement VII of the Avignon Obedience.
  10. ^ Nicolaus was appointed by Urban VI of the Roman Obedience.
  11. ^ Roger was appointed by Boniface IX of the Roman Obedience.
  12. ^ Andrea was appointed by Boniface IX of the Roman Obedience.
  13. ^ Eubel, I, p. 519.
  14. ^ a b Eubel, II, p. 264.
  15. ^ He was a priest of the diocese of Cività Castellana, and was a papal notary. He held the academic rank of Master. Eubel, III, p. 328 with note 3.
  16. ^ Eubel, III, p. 328.
  17. ^ Bernardino died in Rome. Eubel, III, p. 328.
  18. ^ Caracciolo died in Rome. Eubel, III, p. 328.
  19. ^ Carafa died in Rome. Eubel, III, p. 328.
  20. ^ "Archbishop Andrea Matteo Acquaviva d'Aragona" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved March 21, 2016
  21. ^ Orsini was a Roman. He had a degree Doctor in utroque iure (Bologna). He became a Referendary of the Apostolic Signature. He was consecrated in Rome by Cardinal Roberto Ubaldini on 21 September 1621. He was appointed Bishop of Segni on 20 September 1632. Gauchat, IV, p. 315; 361 with note 2.
  22. ^ A Roman, Martinelli was a Doctor of theology, and taught philosophy at the Minerva. He had been Master of the Apostolic Palace. He was appointed Bishop of Conversano (1625-1632). Gauchat, IV, pp. 163 with note 3; 361.
  23. ^ Cordella was a native of Fermo, and was Doctor in utroque iure. He was consecrated in Rome by Cardinal Giovanni Battista Pamphili on 28 October 1635. He was appointed Bishop of Recanati e Loreto on 15 December 1666, and died there on 15 November 1675. Gauchat, IV, pp. 293 with note 5; 361 with note 3.
  24. ^ Leopardi was a Protonotary Apostolic. Gauchat, p. 361 with note 5.
  25. ^ Born in Rome, Cicogni was a Doctor in utroque iure (Civil and Canon Law) from the University of Rome, La Sapienza (1666). Ritzler, V, p. 407 with note 3.
  26. ^ De Massa was born at Mortola in the diocese of Sorrentl. He was Doctor in utroque iure (Civil and Canon Law) from the University of Naples. He was Almoner of Pope Innocent XI and was beneficiatus of the Vatican Basilica. Ritzler, V, p. 407 with note 4.
  27. ^ Joccia was born in Capua, and was a Canon of the Cathedral of Capua. He was an examiner of the clergy of the diocese and Rector of the diocesan seminary. He held the title of Doctor in utroque iure (Doctor of Canon and Civil Law) from the University of Rome, La Sapienza (1694). He was consecrated in Rome by Cardinal Antonio Zondadari on 15 May 1718. He died on 19 January 1733. Ritzler, V, p. 407, with note 5.
  28. ^ Ritzler, VI, p. 434 with note 2.
  29. ^ Ritzler, VI, p. 434 with note 3.
  30. ^ Ritzler, VI, p. 434 with note 4.
  31. ^ Gams, p. 940. Ritzler, VI, p. 434 with note 5.

Books

  • Cappelletti, Giuseppe (1866). Le chiese d'Italia Tomo vigesimo (20). Venezia: Giuseppe Antonelli, pp. 138-160. Retrieved: 2016-10-26.
  • Eubel, Conradus (ed.) (1913). Hierarchia catholica, Tomus 1 (second ed.). Münster: Libreria Regensbergiana.CS1 maint: extra text: authors list (link) (in Latin)
  • Eubel, Conradus (ed.) (1914). Hierarchia catholica, Tomus 2 (second ed.). Münster: Libreria Regensbergiana.CS1 maint: extra text: authors list (link)
  • Eubel, Conradus (ed.); Gulik, Guilelmus (1923). Hierarchia catholica, Tomus 3 (second ed.). Münster: Libreria Regensbergiana.CS1 maint: extra text: authors list (link)
  • Gams, Pius Bonifatius (1873). Series episcoporum Ecclesiae catholicae: quotquot innotuerunt a beato Petro apostolo (in Latin). Ratisbon: Typis et Sumptibus Georgii Josephi Manz.
  • Gauchat, Patritius (Patrice) (1935). Hierarchia catholica IV (1592-1667). Münster: Libraria Regensbergiana. Retrieved .
  • Ritzler, Remigius; Sefrin, Pirminus (1952). Hierarchia catholica medii et recentis aevi V (1667-1730). Patavii: Messagero di S. Antonio. Retrieved .
  • Ritzler, Remigius; Sefrin, Pirminus (1958). Hierarchia catholica medii et recentis aevi VI (1730-1799). Patavii: Messagero di S. Antonio. Retrieved .
  • Ughelli, Ferdinando; Coleti, Niccolò (1719). Italia sacra sive De episcopis Italiæ, et insularum adjacentium (in Latin). Tomus quartus (4). Venice: apud Sebastianum Coleti. Retrieved .


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