Bishop of Borgo San Donnino
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Bishop of Borgo San Donnino
Diocese of Fidenza

Dioecesis Fidentina
Pic-VF4-IT18 Fiorezuola-Fidenza 06 (duomo Fidenza).JPG
Fidenza Cathedral
Location
CountryItaly
Ecclesiastical provinceModena-Nonantola
Statistics
Area451 km2 (174 sq mi)
Population
- Total
- Catholics (including non-members)
(as of 2016)
71,928
65,189 (90.6%)
Parishes70
Information
DenominationCatholic Church
RiteRoman Rite
Established12 February 1601
CathedralCattedrale di S. Donnino Mattire
Secular priests42 (diocesan)
7 (Religious Orders)
16 Permanent Deacons
Current leadership
PopeFrancis
BishopOvidio Vezzoli
Bishops emeritusCarlo Mazza
Website
www.diocesifidenza.it

The Roman Catholic Diocese of Fidenza (Latin: Dioecesis Fidentina) in the Province of Parma, Italy, was until 1927 named the Diocese of Borgo San Donnino. It is now a suffragan of the Metropolitan Archdiocese of Modena-Nonantola, though historically it was long subject to the Archdiocese of Bologna.[1][2]

The bishop's episcopal seat is the Cathedral of San Donnino Martire, in Fidenza.

The diocese has a Minor Basilica, the Basilica di San Lorenzo, in Monticelli d'Ongina; it was assigned that honor on 9 January 1942.[3]

History

In 1199 a long and bloody war was in progress between Parma and Piacenza over Borgo San Donnino. Pope Innocent III rallied the bishops of Lombardy and wrote threateningly to both combatants, attempting to force them to make peace. But the Pope also asserted Church ownership of the Borgo, and claimed the right to assign its civil jurisdiction.[4]

Creation of the diocese

In 1600, the town (oppidum) of Borgo San Donnino, including a territory with seventeen villages, was under the civil government of Ranuccio I Farnese, Duke of Parma and Piacenza. In the town was one collegiate church, the Church of S. Donnino, which belonged to no diocese (nullius dioecesis), and which had three parish churches, three monasteries of men and two of women, and five hospices attached to it. The collegiate church and its dependencies were administered by a chapter, composed of eight canons with eight prebends. They were presided over by a provost (una praepositura), who had to be in Holy Orders, since he held the "cure of souls"; he had an annual income of about 1,300 papal ducats. The Provost had the ordinary jurisdiction (iurisdictionem ordinariam) in the town and its territory, and had the right to use a mitre and pastoral staff.[5]

On 12 February 1601, by the bull Super universas, Pope Clement VIII suppressed and extinguished the office of Provost of the Collegiate Chapter of S. Donnino, and erected the collegiate church into a cathedral, to be the seat of a bishop directly dependent upon the Holy See. A new cathedral chapter was created, headed by an Archdeacon and an Archpriest, with the eight canons of the former collegiate church and an additional four canons, with four additional prebends. The additional prebends were endowed by the Duke. Two of the original eight canons of the collegiate chapter were to serve as Theologus and Penitentiary. The Dukes of Parma were granted the right of patronage and presentation of future Archdeacons, Archpriests, and the four new canonries.[6]

To provide income to support the administration of the new diocese, the Pope transferred territory from the diocese of Cremona situated south of the Po and adjacent to the diocese of Piacenza, to the diocese of Borgo San Donnino. This included Busseto, Polesine Parmense, and Monticelli d'Ogina.[7]

In the papal consistory of 8 January 1603 Pope Clement VIII appointed the last provost, Papiro Picedi da Castel Vezzano, to be the first Bishop of Borgo San Donnino. A brief (breve) addressed to him on the same day informed him of his appointment, recalling that Picedi had been a priest of the diocese of Luni-Sarzana; that he held the degree of Doctor in utroque iure; that he had been a Referendary of the Two Signatures (judge in the Roman Curia); and that he was a familiaris of the Pope.[8]

Development of the diocese

The diocese also had three collegiate churches: Insigne de Busseto (5 Canons), Monticelli d'Ongina (4 Canons), and Pieve Ottoville (4 canons).[9]

In 1828, Bishop Aloisio San Vitale was assigned the task and the honor of creating the new diocese of Guastalla by Pope Leo XII. The Pope also consecrated the first bishop of Bishop of Guastalla, Giovanni Tommaso Neuschel, who later became Bishop of Borgo San Donnino on Bishop San Vitale's death.[10]

In 1885, the Cathedral Chapter consisted of four dignities (Archdeacon, Archpriest, Primicerius, and Penitentiarius) and eight Canons. The diocesan seminary was headed by a priest who was also the Vicar General of the diocese, and it had five professors and two masters; there were thirty-eight students.[11]

During World War I, the diocesan seminary was requisitioned as a hospital for wounded soldiers.[12]

On 22 September 1927 the diocese of Borgo San Donnino was renamed the Diocese of Fidenza.

During World War II, in May 1944, Fidenza was bombed, and on 2 May the Episcopal Palace was hit. There was heavy damage to the diocesan archives. On 13 May another attack destroyed the Episcopal Palace and the Seminary. On 29 January 1948, Bishop Francesco Giberti opened the drive to rebuild the Seminary.[13]

The diocese enjoyed a Papal visit from Pope John Paul II in June 1988.

On 14 January 2003, the Bishops of Fidenza, Parma, and Piacenza entered into a friendly agreement for the adjustment of their diocesan borders. The diocese of Parma received the parishes of Cella, Noceto and Varano Marchesi, from Fidenza. The diocese of Piacenza received the parishes of Mercore and Bersano from Fidenza. The diocese of Fidenza received the parish of San Vitale in Salsomaggiore from Parma; and the parishes of Aione, Besozzola, Cangelasio, Careno, Grotta, Iggio, Mariano, Rigollo, San Nazaro d'Ongina, Scipione, and Varone, from Piacenza.[14]

The most famous native son of Borgo San Donnino was Cardinal Innocenzo Ciocchi del Monte, the adopted nephew of Pope Julius III.[15]

Synods

A diocesan synod was an irregular but important meeting of the bishop of a diocese and his clergy. Its purpose was (1) to proclaim generally the various decrees already issued by the bishop; (2) to discuss and ratify measures on which the bishop chose to consult with his clergy; (3) to publish statutes and decrees of the diocesan synod, of the provincial synod, and of the Holy See.

The first diocesan synod was held by Bishop Giovanni Linati (1606-1620) on 14 October 1608.[16] He held the second diocesan synod on 15 October 1615.[17] The third diocesan synod was held by Bishop Alfonso Pozzi (Puteo) on 20 May 1624.[18] Bishop Antonio Pallavicini presided over the diocesan synod of 4-6 June 1663.[19] Bishop Gaetano Garimberti (1675-1684) presided over the diocesan synod of 5 December 1678.[20] Bishop Nicolò Caranza (1686-1697) held a diocesan synod on 20-22 May 1697. He ordered the minutes of the meetings published, to which he had appended thirteen enactments of popes or Roman curial offices. His own decrees included regulations for the Cathedral Chapter (Caput XXIII-XXVI).[21]

Bishop Adriano Sermattei (1713-1719) held a diocesan synod in 1713.[22] On 27-29 April 1728, Bishop Gherardo Zandemaria (1719-1731) held a diocesan synod.

Bishop Vincenzo Manicardi (1879-1886) presided over a diocesan synod on 5-7 June 1883; it was particularly concerned with issues raised by the First Vatican Council.[23]

In 1956 Bishop Paolo Rota (1953-1960) presided over a diocesan synod.[24] Bishop Mario Zanchin (1962-1988) conducted a diocesan synod in 1987.[25]

Bishops of Borgo San Donnino

Sede vacante (March 1684-August 1686)
Sede vacante (1813-1817)
  • Aloisio San Vitale (1817-1836)[41]
  • Giovanni Tommaso Neuschel (1836-1843)[42]
  • Pier Grisologo Basetti (1843-1857)[43]
Sede vacante (16 June 1857 - 20 June 1859)
  • Francesco Benassi (1859-1871)[44]
  • Giuseppe Buscarini (1871-1872)[45]
  • Gaetano Guindani (1872- 1879)[46]
  • Vincenzo Manicardi (1879-1886)[47]
  • Giovanni Battista Tescari (1886.06.07 - death 1902.07.08)[48]
  • Pietro Terroni (1903.06.22 - death 1907.08.28)
  • Leonida Mapelli (1907.10.14 - death 1915.02.24)
  • Giuseppe Fabbrucci (1915.08.06 - 1927.09.22 see below)

Bishops of Fidenza

  • Giuseppe Fabbrucci (continuing, with changed title 1927-1930)[49]
  • Mario Vianello (1931-1943)[50]
  • Francesco Giberti (1943-1952)[51]
  • Paolo Rota (1952-1960)[52]
  • Guglielmo Bosetti (1961-1962)[53]
  • Mario Zanchin (1962-1988)[54]
  • Carlo Poggi (1988-1997)[55]
  • Maurizio Galli (1998-2007)[56]
  • Carlo Mazza (2007-2017)[57]
  • Ovidio Vezzoli (2017 - ... )[58]

See also

References

  1. ^ "Diocese of Fidenza" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved 7 October 2016. [self-published source]
  2. ^ "Diocese of Fidenza" GCatholic.org. Gabriel Chow. Retrieved 7 October 2016.[self-published source]
  3. ^ Gabriel Chow, G-Catholic.org, "Basilica di San Lorenzo"; retrieved: 24 September 2018.[self-published source]
  4. ^ "...ipsos Placentinos et Parmenses ad subeundem judicium nostrum sufficientissima in manibus tuis hinc inde praestita cautione, vel Parmenses, ut borgum ipsum nomine nostro in manibus tuis tenendum assignent restituendum per nos eis quibus jure fuerit assignandum, omni occasione escusatione, dilatione, appellatione et recusatione cessantibus, nostra fretus auctoritate compellas...." J. P. Migne (ed.), Patrologiae Latinae Cursus Completus Vol. CCXIV (Paris 1890), pp. 580-582, Epistle II, 39 (27 April 1199). Istoria del dominio temporale della sede apostolica nel Ducato di Parma e Piacenza (in Italian). Roma. 1720. pp. 75-77.
  5. ^ Cappelletti, pp. 73-74.
  6. ^ Aloisius Tomassetti, ed. (1865). Bullarum diplomatum et privilegiorum sanctorum romanorum pontificum taurinensis editio locupletior (in Latin) (Tomus decimus ed.). Turin: Sebastiano Franco et filiis editoribus. pp. 653-658, § 3, 8.
  7. ^ Clement VIII, Super universas, § 4. Cappelletti, pp. 75-76.
  8. ^ Cappelletti, pp. 80-82. Gauchat, Hierarchia catholica IV, p. 124.
  9. ^ Giuseppe Bertolotti (1886). Statistica ecclesiastica d'Italia (in Italian). Savona: tipografia di A. Ricci. p. 304.
  10. ^ Bullarii Romani Continuatio (in Latin). Tomus Decimus Septimus (17), continens Pontificatus Leonis XII. Annum Quartum Ad Sextum. Rome. 1855. p. 392.
  11. ^ Bertolotti, p. 304.
  12. ^ Gianpaolo Gregori and Amos Aimi, "Giuseppe Fabbrucci", Museo del Duomo di Fidenza; retrieved: 2018-09-22.
  13. ^ Guida degli archivi diocesiani d'Italia Volume III (Roma: Ministero per i beni culturali e ambientali, Ufficio centrale per i beni archivistici 1998), p. 141. Annuario diocesano 2018, p. 44. (in Italian)
  14. ^ Gianpaolo Gregori and Amos Aimi, "Maurizio Galli", Museo del Duomo di Fidenza; retrieved: 27 September 2018.
  15. ^ Francis A. Burkle-Young; Michael Leopoldo Doerrer (1997). The Life of Cardinal Innocenzo Del Monte: A Scandal in Scarlet ; Together with Materials for a History of the House of Ciocchi Del Monte San Savino. Lewiston NY USA: E. Mellen Press. pp. 77-80. ISBN 978-0-7734-8581-5.
  16. ^ Constitutiones, et decreta condita in synodo dioecesana ciuitatis Burgi Sancti Donnini prima. Quam habuit ... Ioannes Linatus Dei, & sanctae apostolicae sedis gratia episcopus Burgi Sancti Donnini de anno 1608. die 14. Octobris. ... (in Latin). Parma: apud Erasmum Viothum. 1608.
  17. ^ J.D. Mansi, ed., Sacrorum Conciliorum nova et amplissima collectio, editio novissima, Tomus XXXVIter (Arnheim-Leipzig 1924), pp. 43-44.
  18. ^ Synodus dioecesana Burgensis, ab Alphonso Puteo, civitatis Burgi S. Domnini episcopo, primo habita anno 1624 (in Latin). Piacenza: Jacobus Ardizzonus. 1624. Mansi, pp. 105-106.
  19. ^ Synodus dioecesana Burgensis ab Alexandro Pallavicino, episcopo civitatis Burgi S. Domnini, primo habita, 1663 (in Latin). Parma: Haered. Erasmi de Viothis. 1663. Mansi, pp. 383-384.
  20. ^ Mansi, p. 384.
  21. ^ Constitutiones synodales Burgi S. Donnini ab illustrissimo et reuerendissimo d. d. Nicolao Caranza episcopo editae ac celebratae diebus 20, 21, 22 maij 1697, pontificijs constitutionibus, sacris canonibus & sacrae Congregationis decretis exornatae . (in Latin). Borgo San Donnino: typis Josephi Rossetti, Impressoris Episcopalis. 1697. pp. 114-125.
  22. ^ Mansi, p. 384.
  23. ^ Synodus dioecesana Fidentina ab Illmo et Rmo D. Vincentio Manicardi Dei et Ap. Sedis gratia ecclesiae Burgi S. Domnini Episcopo celebrata (Modena 1883). Mansi, p. 384. Alfons Bellesheim, "Englische, italienische, und österreichische Synoden des letzten Decenniums," Archiv für katholisches Kirchenrecht 52 (Mainz 1884), pp. 225-241, at 239-240.
  24. ^ Gianpaolo Gregori and Amos Aimi, "Paolo Rota", Museo del Duomo di Fidenza; retrieved: 2018-09-24.
  25. ^ Gianpaolo Gregori and Amos Aimi, "Mario Zanchin", Museo del Duomo di Fidenza; retrieved: 2018-09-22.
  26. ^ Picedi was appointed Bishop of Borgo San Donnino on 8 January 1603, and was transferred to the diocese of Parma on 30 August 1606. He died on 4 March 1614. Ughelli, pp. 68-70. Gauchat, pp. 124, 275.
  27. ^ A native of Parma, Linati was the son of the Farnese court physician. He held the degree of Doctor in utroque iure. He was a member of the Order of S. Anthony of Vienne, and held benefices of the Order in Parma and Borgo San Donnino. He had an extensive career as a civil administrator in several towns in the Papal States. He was named Bishop of Borgo San Donnino on 4 December 1606. On 13 January 1620 he was transferred by Pope Paul V to the diocese of Piacenza (1619-1627). He died on 2 April 1627. Ughelli, p. 70. Gams, p. 742 column 2. Gauchat, pp. 124, with note 3; 281, with note 3.
  28. ^ A native of Piacenza, Pozzi belonged to the family of the Counts of Castronuovo. He held the degree of Doctor in utroque iure, and was several times an ambassador of the Duke of Parma. Pozzi was appointed bishop in the Consistory of 30 March 1620 by Pope Paul V. He was consecrated a bishop in Rome on 5 April 1620 by Cardinal Roberto Ubaldini. He died on 25 August 1626. Ughelli, p. 70. Gams, p. 742 column 2. Gauchat, p. 124, with note 4. David M. Cheney, Catholic-Hierarchy.org"Bishop (Thomas) Alfonso Pozzi"; retrieved 4 December 2016.[self-published source]
  29. ^ Of a noble family of Piacenza, Scotti, the Marquis of Montalbo, held the degree of Doctor in utroque iure. Scotti was also and principally a papal diplomat; under Pope Urban VIII he was Apostolic Nuncio to Switzerland (1630-1639), and Apostolic Nuncio to France (1639 - 1641). On his return from France he was named Vicar of the Vatican Basilica. He also became Governor of the Marches. On 5 August 1645 he was relieved on the responsibility for the diocese of Borgo San Donnino, which he resigned on 13 March 1650. He took up the post of Prefect of the Apostolic Palace on 20 December 1653. He died in retirement in Piacenza in 1666. Ughelli, p. 71. Cappelletti, pp. 83-84. Gauchat, p. 124 with note 5. Gian Pietro Pozzi (1995). Le Porpore di Casa Farnese: luci ed ombre nella Controriforma (in Italian). Piacenza: TipLeCo. p. 101.
  30. ^ Of a noble family of Sarzana, Casoni was the nephew of Bishop Vincenzo Landinello of Albenga. His brother Niccolò Casoni was conte di Villanova. He served in the embassy in Portugal at the end of the reign of Pope Paul V (1605-1624). In 1624 he was a computista and procuratore of the College of Cardinals. He was appointed Bishop of Borgo San Donnino on 27 February 1651, and was consecrated in Rome by Cardinal Giulio Roma on 12 March 1652. According to his tombstone, he died on 22 July 1659 at the age of 61. According to Gams (p. 742) Casoni urged Ferdinando Ughelli to write his Italia Sacra Ughelli, pp. 71-72. Gauchat, p. 124 with note 6.
  31. ^ Born in 1613 in the territory of Tabiani in the duchy of Parma. In 1628 he joined the Order of Saint Benedict at the monastery of S. Giovanni Battista in Parma. He rose to be Procurator General of the Order. Pallavicini was appointed bishop on 12 January 1660. He held a diocesan synod in 1663. He died on 25 May 1675. Ughelli, p. 72. Gauchat, p. 124 with note 7.
  32. ^ Garimberti was born in Parma in 1615. In 1630 he joined the Theatines, and eventually rose to hold the posts of Procurator and Provost General. He also lectured in theology in the houses of his Order (Coleti, in Ughelli, says it was philosophy). Pope Clement X named him Bishop of Borgo San Donnino in the Consistory of 16 December 1675. He enlarged the episcopal palace, embellished the Cathedral, and assigned the Canons new garb. He died on 20 March 1684. Ughelli, p. 72. Ritzler-Sefrin, V, p. 130, with note 3.
  33. ^ Caranza was a native of Genoa, and held the degree of Doctor in utroque iure (Parma, 1663). He had been Primicerius in the Cathedral Chapter of Genoa. He also served as Auditor (judge-delegate) for Cardinal Giambattista Spinola (Archbishop of Genoa, 1664-1681; Governor of Rome, 1675-1681, and pro-Governor 1681-1691). Caranza was appointed Bishop of Borgo San Donnino by Pope Innocent XI on 12 August 1686. He held a diocesan synod in 1697. He died on 25 November 1697. Ughelli, p. 72. Ritzler-Sefrin, V, p. 130, with note 4.
  34. ^ Born in Parma in 1642, Della Rosa held the degree of Doctor in utroque iure (Parma. 1665). In 1681 he was appointed Vicar General of the diocese of Parma by Bishop Thomas Saladini, and was a Canon of the Cathedral Chapter of Parma. During the vacancy of 1694, he was elected Vicar Capitular by the Chapter. He was reappointed Vicar General by Bishop Giuseppe Olgiati. Della Rosa was appointed Bishop of Borgo San Donnino by Pope Innocent XII in the Consistory of 21 July 1698. He died on 31 December 1699. Ughelli, p. 72. Cappelletti, pp. 86-87. Ritzler-Sefrin, V, p. 130, with note 5.
  35. ^ Alessandro de Roncoveteri was born in Piacenza in 1642, and held the degree of Doctor in utroque iure (Parma. 1696). He was appointed bishop on 28 May 1700, and consecrated in Rome on 31 May 1700 by Cardinal Sebastiano Tanaro. He patronized the Capuchins and built their monastery and church in Monticelli. He died in Piacenza on 31 May 1711. Ughelli, p. 72. Cappelletti, p. 87. Ritzler-Sefrin, V, p. 131, with note 6.
  36. ^ Sermattei was born in Assisi in 1680, and held the degree of Doctor in utroque iure (Sapienza Rome, 1710). He was Auditor (judge-delegate) of Cardinal Michelangelo Conti, who appointed him Vicar General of the diocese of Osimo (1710), then of Assisi, then of Viterbo. He was appointed Bishop of Borgo San Donnino on 30 January 1713 by Pope Clement XI. On 15 March 1719 Sermattei was transferred to the diocese of Viterbo and Toscanella (1719-1731). He died on 9 April 1731. Ughelli, pp. 72-73. Ritzler-Sefrin, V, p. 131, with note 7.
  37. ^ Gerardo Giandemaria, as his name was sometimes spelled, appointed Bishop of Borgo San Donnino on 15 May 1719. He held a diocesan synod in April 1728. He was transferred to the diocese of Piacenza on 24 December 1731. He died on 5 November 1747. Cappelletti, p. 87. Ritzler-Sefrin, V, p. 131, with note 8.
  38. ^ Missini was born in Orvieto in 1684, and held the degree of Doctor in utroque iure (Sapienza Rome, 1719). He became a Protonotary Apostolic, and was appointed Auditor General of the Legation in Avignon. He became a priest on 15 April 1732, and on 9 June 1632 was appointed Bishop of Borgo San Donnino. He was consecrated in Rome on 22 June by Cardinal Guadagni. He died on 20 January 1753. Cappelletti, p. 87. Ritzler-Sefrin, Hierarchia catholica VI, p. 135 with note 2.
  39. ^ Born in Parma in 1712, Bajardi was the son of Count Artaserse Bajardi (his name is also spelled Baiardi). He held the degree of Doctor in utroque iure (Parma. 1744). He was already a synodal judge and Canon of the Cathedral by 1748, as well as a Councilor to the Duek of Parma; he rose to be Provost of the Cathedral Chapter. He was appointed Bishop on 9 April 1753, and was consecrated in Rome on 23 April by Cardinal Joaquín Fernández de Portocarrero. He provided ornaments and vestments for the cathedral. He supported the building of the Civil Hospital of Borgo, and was a supporter of the Jesuits. He died on 24 August 1775. Cappelletti, pp. 87-88. Ritzler-Sefrin, Hierarchia catholica VI, p. 135 with note 3.
  40. ^ Garimberti was born in Parma in 1736. He was a doctor of theology of the University of Parma. He was appointed Bishop of Borgo San Donnino on 28 January 1776, and was consecrated in Rome by Cardinal Lazzaro Opizio Pallavicino on 4 February 1776. He died on 2 April 1713. Cappelletti, p. 88. Ritzler-Sefrin, Hierarchia catholica VI, p. 135 with note 4.
  41. ^ San Vitale was appointed Bishop of Borgo San Donnino by Pope Pius VII on 28 July 1817, and was consecrated in Rome on 3 August by Cardinal Giulio della Somaglia. He was transferred to the diocese of Piacenza by Pope Gregory XVI on 21 November 1836. He died on 25 October 1848. Ritzler-Sefrin, VII, pp. 122, 309.
  42. ^ Born in Szepesváralja (Hungary, Scepusio) in 1780, Neuschel, the Chaplain of the regnant Duchess of Parma, Maria Luisa, was appointed Titular Bishop of Alexandria Troas (Turkey) on 28 January 1828, and consecrated by Bishop Aloisio San Vitale of Borgo San Donnino on 2 March 1828. On 30 September 1828 he was appointed the first Bishop of the new Guastalla (Italy) (1828-1836). On 21 November 1836 he was named Bishop of Borgo San Donnino. He was transferred to the diocese of Parma on 27 January 1843, at the explicit request of Duchess Marie Louise, which he resigned on 17 September 1852. He was then assigned the titular diocese of Theodosiopolis (Aprus) (Armenia Minor), which he held until his death on 10 December 1863. Gams, pp. 743, 759. Ritzler-Sefrin, VII, pp. 122, 208, 300, 379; VIII, p. 547.
  43. ^ Basetti was born in Vairo (diocese of Parma) in 1790. He was a courtier of principessa Antonia di Borbone, dama Orsolina, and was her confessor for thirteen years. He was appointed Titular Bishop of Sebaste in Phrygia on 18 December 1834. On 22 June 1843 he was transferred by Pope Gregory XVI to the diocese of Borgo San Donnino. He died on 16 June 1857. Notizie per l'anno 1855 (in Italian). Roma: typographia della rev. cam. apostolica. 1835. pp. 99-100."Sebastenus in Phrygia". catholic-hierarchy.org. Retrieved 2017.[self-published source] Ritzler-Sefrin, VII, pp. 122, 338. Lodovico Gambara (1966). Le Ville Parmensi (in Italian). Parma: La Nazionale. p. 334.
  44. ^ Born at Villa San Sisto (Parma) in 1811, Benassi was appointed bishop of Borgo San Donnino on 20 June 1859. On 27 October 1871 he was transferred to the diocese of Guastalla, which he governed until his resignation on 10 November 1884. He was then named Titular Bishop of Argos (1884-1892). He died on 15 March 1892. Ritzler-Sefrin, VIII, pp. 120, 163, 294.
  45. ^ Born at Peli di Coli (Piacenza), Buscarini studied with the Jesuits in Piacenza, and then at the diocesan seminary. Ordained in 1842, he spent three years teaching in the minor seminary, and then taught philosophy (Thomas Aquinas) in the Major Seminary at Borgo San Donnino. He was appointed a Canon of the Cathedral Chapter, then Archdeacon, and then diocesan Vicar General of Bishop Bosetti. At Bosetti's death in 1857 he was elected Vicar Capitular. He was named Bishop of Borgo San Donnino on 24 November 1871, and was consecrated a bishop in Piacenza, by Bishop Antonio Ranza. As bishop, he continued his seminary teaching. He died on 11 September 1872, during a pilgrimage to Fontanellato. Ritzler-Sefrin, VIII, p. 163. Gianpaolo Gregori and Amos Aimi, "Giuseppe Buscarini", Museo del Duomo di Fidenza; retrieved: 2018-09-25.
  46. ^ Guindani was appointed Bishop of Borgo San Donnino on 21 December 1872 by Pope Pius IX. He was transferred to the diocese of Bergamo, from 19 September 1879 until his death on 21 October 1904. Ritzler-Sefrin, VIII, pp. 147, 163. Gianpaolo Gregori and Amos Aimi, "Gaetano Guindani", Museo del Duomo di Fidenza; retrieved: 25 September 2018.
  47. ^ Manicardi was born in Rubiera (Reggio) in 1825. He was appointed bishop of Borgo San Donnino on 19 September 1879, and consecrated in Rome on 28 September by Cardinal Raffaele Monaco La Valletta. He took possession of the diocese on 1 February 1880. He was transferred to the diocese of Reggio Emilia by Pope Leo XIII on 7 June 1886. He died on 20 October 1901. Giuseppe Bertolotti (1886). Statistica ecclesiastica d'Italia (in Italian). Savona: tipografia di A. Ricci. p. 304. Ritzler-Sefrin, VIII, p. 163.
  48. ^ Gianpaolo Gregori and Amos Aimi, "Giovanni Battista Tescari", Museo del Duomo di Fidenza; retrieved: 22 September 2018.
  49. ^ Fabbrucci was born in Cancelli di Reggiolo (FI) in 1861. He was a Canon of the Cathedral Chapter of Fiesole, and he taught theology at the Minor Seminary in Strata for fifteen years. He was appointed Bishop of Borgo San Donnino 6 August 1915, and was consecrated in Fiesole by Bishop Giovanni Fossa. He made his solemn entry into the diocese in January 1916. He died on 9 August 1930 at the age of 69. Gianpaolo Gregori and Amos Aimi, "Giuseppe Fabbrucci", Museo del Duomo di Fidenza; retrieved: 22 September 2018. Pi?ta, Hierarchia catholica IX, p. 96.
  50. ^ Born a native of Venice in 1887, Vianello taught theology in the seminary, and obtained the degree of Doctor in utroque iure. He served as a chaplain in the Royal Italian Navy during World War I. In 1919 he was named Vice-Chancellor of the diocese of Venice, and in 1921 Chancellor. He became a Canon of the Patriarchal Basilica. He was appointed Bishop of Fidenza on 6 March 1931 by Pope Pius XI, and consecrated by the Patriarch of Venice, Cardinal Pietro La Fontaine on 10 May 1931. He was transferred to the diocese of Perugia on 11 March 1943. He died on 13 August 1955. Gianpaolo Gregori and Amos Aimi, "Mario Vianello", Museo del Duomo di Fidenza; retrieved: 26 September 2018.
  51. ^ Born in Modena in 1890, Giberti was appointed Bishop of Fidenza by Pope Pius XI on 12 May 1943. He was consecrated on 20 June 1943. He died on 19 February 1952. Gianpaolo Gregori and Amos Aimi, "Mario Vianello", Museo del Duomo di Fidenza; retrieved: 26 September 2018.
  52. ^ Born in 1886 at Casalsigone, Rota was previously Titular Bishop of Memphis (10 March 1947 - 28 December 1952), and Auxiliary Bishop of Cremona. He was appointed Bishop of Fidenza by Pope Pius XII on 28 December 1952, and died on 31 December 1960.
  53. ^ Bosseti was born in Chiari (Brescia). He studied at the Pontifical Biblical Institute in Rome, and obtained a Licenciate in Sacred Scriptures; he taught Scriptures at the seminary in Brescia. He was named Titular Bishop of Hippo Diarrhytus (4 November 1951-29 March 1961) and Auxiliary Bishop of Brescia by Pope Pius XII. He was appointed Bishop of Fidenza by Pope John XXIII on 29 March 1961. He died on 1 August 1962. Gianpaolo Gregori and Amos Aimi, "Guglielmo Bosetti", Museo del Duomo di Fidenza; retrieved: 26 September 2018.
  54. ^ Zanchin was appointed Bishop of Fidenza on 30 September 1962 by Pope John XXIII. He retired in accordance with Canon Law on 13 August 1988, when his letter of resignation was accepted by Pope John Paul II. Gianpaolo Gregori and Amos Aimi, "Mario Zanchin", Museo del Duomo di Fidenza; retrieved: 22 September 2018.
  55. ^ A native of Piacenza, Bishop Poggi held the degree of Doctor of Canon Law (Sapienza, Rome). He was appointed on 13 August 1988 by Pope John Paul II. He died on 7 September 1997. Gianpaolo Gregori and Amos Aimi, "Carlo Poggi", Museo del Duomo di Fidenza; retrieved: 26 September 2018.
  56. ^ Galli was a native of Cremona, born in 1936. He was rector of the episcopal seminary of Cremona. Pope John Paul II appointed him Bishop of Fidenza on 2 April 1998, and he was consecrated in Cremona by the Bishop of Cremona, Giulio Nicolini, on 2 May 1998. In 2003 Galli agreed to the rectification of the borders of the dioceses of Fidenza, Parma, and Piacenza. He was persuaded by the Papal Nuncio to Italy to resign his diocese, which he did onn 30 June 2007. He died in Cremona of brain cancer on 1 June 2008. Gianpaolo Gregori and Amos Aimi, "Maurizio Galli", Museo del Duomo di Fidenza; retrieved: 26 September 2018.
  57. ^ Mazza was born at Entratico (Bergamo) in 1942. He obtained a licenciate in theology from the Lateran University in Rome, and a master's degree in tourism from the University "Bocconi" in Milan. From 1982 to 1985 he worked at the Catholic Bureau of Italian Tourism (UCIT) in Rome. In 1988 he became Director of the National Bureau for Leisure Time and Sport. From 1994 to 2001, he taught the theology and spirituality of Pilgrimage at the Lateran University. He was named Bishop of Fidenza on 1 October 2007. He submitted his resignation upon reaching the age of 75, in accordance with Canon Law, which was accepted on 17 March 2017. Gianpaolo Gregori and Amos Aimi, "Carlo Mazza", Museo del Duomo di Fidenza; retrieved: 26 September 2018.
  58. ^ Vezzoli was appointed Bishop of Fidenza on 17 March 2017, and consecrated a bishop on 2 July 2017; he was formally installed on his episcopal seat on 16 July 2017. Diocesi di Fidenza, Home » Vescovo » Biografia Mons. Ovidio Vezzoli; retrieved: 19 September 2018. (in Italian)

Bibliography

Studies

External links

Acknowledgment

 This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainHerbermann, Charles, ed. (1913). "Borgo San-Donnino". Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton Company.

Coordinates: 44°52?00?N 10°04?00?E / 44.8667°N 10.0667°E / 44.8667; 10.0667

  1. ^ The Annuario diocesano 2018 provides a list of all of the paishes in the diocese, pp. 45-114. A complete list of clergy, diocesan and regular, is provided, pp. 124-150. Permanent deacons are listed at pp. 153-155.

  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

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