Best Comedy Album
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Best Comedy Album
Grammy Award for Best Comedy Album
Awarded forQuality comedy albums
CountryUnited States
Presented byNational Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences
First awarded1959
Currently held byDave Chappelle,
Equanimity & The Bird Revelation (2019)
Websitegrammy.com

The Grammy Award for Best Comedy Album is presented by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States to "honor artistic achievement in comedy."[1] The award was awarded yearly from 1959 to 1993 and then from 2004 to present day. There have been several minor changes to the name of the award over this time:

  • From 1959 to 1967 it was Best Comedy Performance
  • From 1968 to 1991 it was known as Best Comedy Recording
  • From 1992 to 1993 and from 2004 to the present day it was awarded as Best Comedy Album

In 1960 and 1961 two separate awards were presented for the best spoken and for the best musical comedy performance.

In 1994 the award was restricted to spoken word comedy albums and moved into the "spoken" field. From then through 2003, it was awarded as the Grammy Award for Best Spoken Comedy Album.

In 2004 the award was reinstated within the comedy field as the Grammy Award for Best Comedy Album, once again allowing musical comedy works to be considered.

Bill Cosby holds the record for most consecutive wins, with six earned between 1965 and 1970. Peter Schickele (of P.D.Q. Bach fame) is the runner-up, with four wins between 1990 and 1993.

1959-1969

Year[I] Winner(s) Work Nominees Ref.
1959 Ross Bagdasarian Sr. "The Chipmunk Song (Christmas Don't Be Late)"
[2]
1960
(musical comedy)
Homer and Jethro The Battle of Kookamonga
[3]
1960
(spoken comedy)
Shelley Berman Inside Shelley Berman
[3]
1961
(musical comedy)
Jo Stafford & Paul Weston Jonathan and Darlene Edwards in Paris
[3]
1961
(spoken comedy)
Bob Newhart The Button-Down Mind Strikes Back! [3]
1962 Elaine May & Mike Nichols An Evening with Mike Nichols and Elaine May
  • Jose Jimenez the Astronaut - Bill Dana
  • Stan Freberg Presents the United States of America - Stan Freberg
  • Here's Jonathan - Jonathan Winters
[4]
1963 Vaughn Meader The First Family [5]
1964 Allan Sherman "Hello Muddah, Hello Fadduh (A Letter from Camp)" [6]
1965 Bill Cosby I Started Out as a Child
[7]
1966 Bill Cosby Why Is There Air?
[8]
1967 Bill Cosby Wonderfulness
[9]
1968 Bill Cosby Revenge
[10]
1969 Bill Cosby To Russell, My Brother, Whom I Slept With
[11]

1970s

1972 winner Lily Tomlin is the first solo woman to win
Year[I] Winner(s) Work Nominees Ref.
1970 Bill Cosby Sports [12]
1971 Flip Wilson The Devil Made Me Buy This Dress
[13]
1972 Lily Tomlin This Is A Recording
[14]
1973 George Carlin FM & AM [15]
1974 Cheech & Chong Los Cochinos [16]
1975 Richard Pryor That Nigger's Crazy [17]
1976 Richard Pryor ...Is It Something I Said? [18]
1977 Richard Pryor Bicentennial Nigger [19]
1978 Steve Martin Let's Get Small [20]
1979 Steve Martin A Wild and Crazy Guy
[21]

1980s

Five-time winner Richard Pryor
Year[I] Winner(s) Work Nominees Ref.
1980 Robin Williams Reality...What a Concept [22]
1981 Rodney Dangerfield No Respect
[23]
1982 Richard Pryor Rev. Du Rite
[24]
1983 Richard Pryor Live on the Sunset Strip [25]
1984 Eddie Murphy Eddie Murphy: Comedian
[26]
1985 "Weird Al" Yankovic "Eat It" [27]
1986 Whoopi Goldberg Whoopi Goldberg (Original Broadway Show Recording) [28]
1987 Bill Cosby Those of You with or Without Children, You'll Understand
[29]
1988 Robin Williams A Night at the Met
[30]
1989 Robin Williams Good Morning, Vietnam [31]

1990s

Seven-time winner Bill Cosby
Year[I] Winner(s) Work Nominees Ref.
1990 Peter Schickele P.D.Q. Bach: 1712 Overture and Other Musical Assaults
[32]
1991 Peter Schickele P.D.Q. Bach: Oedipus Tex and Other Choral Calamities
[33]
1992 Peter Schickele P.D.Q. Bach: WTWP Classical Talkity-Talk Radio
[34]
1993 Peter Schickele P.D.Q. Bach: Music for an Awful Lot of Winds and Percussion
[35]
1994 George Carlin Jammin' in New York
[36]
1995 Sam Kinison Live From Hell
[37]
1996 Jonathan Winters Crank(y) Calls
[38]
1997 Al Franken Rush Limbaugh Is a Big Fat Idiot and Other Observations
[39]
1998 Chris Rock Roll with the New
[40]
1999 Mel Brooks & Carl Reiner The 2000 Year Old Man in the Year 2000 [41]

2000s

Five-time winner George Carlin
Year[I] Winner(s) Work Nominees Ref.
2000 Chris Rock Bigger & Blacker
[42]
2001 George Carlin Brain Droppings [43]
2002 George Carlin Napalm & Silly Putty
[44]
2003 Robin Williams Robin Williams: Live on Broadway [45]
2004 "Weird Al" Yankovic Poodle Hat
[46]
2005 Jon Stewart and
the cast of The Daily Show
The Daily Show with Jon Stewart Presents ... America: A Citizen's Guide to Democracy Inaction
[47]
2006 Chris Rock Never Scared [48]
2007 Lewis Black The Carnegie Hall Performance [49]
2008 Flight of the Conchords The Distant Future
[50]
2009 George Carlin It's Bad for Ya
Posthumous; Carlin's daughter Kelly Carlin-McCall accepted the award on his behalf.
[51]

2010s

2010 winner Stephen Colbert in 2017
Two-time winner Louis C.K.
Year[I] Winner(s) Work Nominees Ref.
2010 Stephen Colbert A Colbert Christmas: The Greatest Gift of All! [52]
2011 Lewis Black Stark Raving Black [53]
2012 Louis C.K. Hilarious [54]
2013 Jimmy Fallon Blow Your Pants Off [55]
2014 Kathy Griffin Calm Down Gurrl
[56]
2015 "Weird Al" Yankovic Mandatory Fun [57]
2016 Louis C.K. Live at Madison Square Garden
[58]
2017 Patton Oswalt Talking for Clapping [59]
2018 Dave Chappelle The Age of Spin & Deep in the Heart of Texas [60]
2019 Dave Chappelle Equanimity & The Bird Revelation
[61]

Artists with multiple wins

Artists with multiple nominations

References

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