Allentown, New Jersey
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Allentown, New Jersey

Allentown, New Jersey
Borough of Allentown
Downtown Allentown
Downtown Allentown
Map of Allentown in Monmouth County. Inset: Location of Monmouth County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Allentown in Monmouth County. Inset: Location of Monmouth County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Allentown, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Allentown, New Jersey
Allentown, New Jersey is located in New Jersey
Allentown, New Jersey
Allentown, New Jersey
Location of Allentown in New Jersey
Allentown, New Jersey is located in the United States
Allentown, New Jersey
Allentown, New Jersey
Allentown, New Jersey (the United States)
Allentown, New Jersey is located in North America
Allentown, New Jersey
Allentown, New Jersey
Allentown, New Jersey (North America)
Coordinates: 40°10?43?N 74°35?24?W / 40.178578°N 74.590056°W / 40.178578; -74.590056Coordinates: 40°10?43?N 74°35?24?W / 40.178578°N 74.590056°W / 40.178578; -74.590056[1][2]
Country
State New Jersey
CountyMonmouth
IncorporatedJanuary 29, 1889
Named forNathan Allen or William Allen
Government
 o TypeBorough
 o BodyBorough Council
 o MayorThomas C. Fritts (I, term ends December 31, 2023)[3][4]
 o Municipal clerkLaurie A. Roth[5]
Area
 o Total0.62 sq mi (1.61 km2)
 o Land0.60 sq mi (1.54 km2)
 o Water0.03 sq mi (0.06 km2)  4.03%
Area rank537th of 565 in state
45th of 53 in county[1]
Elevation75 ft (23 m)
Population
 o Total1,828
 o Estimate 
(2019)[11]
1,775
 o Rank496th of 566 in state
43rd of 53 in county[12]
 o Density3,023.9/sq mi (1,167.5/km2)
 o Density rank214th of 566 in state
25th of 53 in county[12]
Time zoneUTC-05:00 (Eastern (EST))
 o Summer (DST)UTC-04:00 (Eastern (EDT))
ZIP Code
Area code(s)609 Exchanges: 259, 752, 758[15]
FIPS code3402500760[1][16][17]
GNIS feature ID0885137[1][18]
Websiteallentownboronj.com

Allentown is a borough in Monmouth County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 1,828,[8][9][10] reflecting a decline of 54 (-2.9%) from the 1,882 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 54 (+3.0%) from the 1,828 counted in the 1990 Census.[19]

Allentown was incorporated as a borough by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on January 29, 1889, from portions of Upper Freehold Township, based on the results of a referendum held that day.[20] The borough was named for settler Robert Burnet's son-in-law, Nathan Allen[21] or for William Allen, who served as Chief Justice of the Province of Pennsylvania.[22]

Allentown's shopping district has antique and specialty shops, as well as restaurants. Many historic homes and historic buildings are located in the borough. The Horse Park of New Jersey is a park located near the borough but does have an Allentown mailing address. Heritage Park is located within the borough near the shopping district.

The borough received the 'Village Center' designation in 2002, which will allow the borough to receive additional state aid aimed at preserving historic and natural resource sites that are at risk.[23][24]

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 0.62 square miles (1.61 km2), including 0.60 square miles (1.54 km2) of land and 0.03 square miles (0.06 km2) of water (4.03%).[1][2]

Allentown borders the municipalities of Upper Freehold Township in Monmouth County and Robbinsville Township in Mercer County.[25][26][27]

Demographics

Census 2010

The 2010 United States Census counted 1,828 people, 704 households, and 499 families in the borough. The population density was 3,023.9 per square mile (1,167.5/km2). There were 735 housing units at an average density of 1,215.8 per square mile (469.4/km2). The racial makeup was 90.97% (1,663) White, 4.43% (81) Black or African American, 0.11% (2) Native American, 1.53% (28) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 0.88% (16) from other races, and 2.08% (38) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.56% (65) of the population.[8]

Of the 704 households, 33.7% had children under the age of 18; 54.8% were married couples living together; 12.1% had a female householder with no husband present and 29.1% were non-families. Of all households, 22.7% were made up of individuals and 7.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.60 and the average family size was 3.11.[8]

24.8% of the population were under the age of 18, 7.3% from 18 to 24, 22.2% from 25 to 44, 34.4% from 45 to 64, and 11.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42.4 years. For every 100 females, the population had 90.8 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and older there were 89.7 males.[8]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $93,250 (with a margin of error of +/- $15,183) and the median family income was $101,875 (+/- $5,413). Males had a median income of $75,125 (+/- $13,989) versus $55,119 (+/- $7,348) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $36,970 (+/- $2,599). About 1.8% of families and 1.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 0.8% of those under age 18 and 2.5% of those age 65 or over.[35]

Census 2000

As of the 2000 United States Census[16] there were 1,882 people, 708 households, and 526 families residing in the borough. The population density was 3,097.1 people per square mile (1,191.2/km2). There were 718 housing units at an average density of 1,181.6 per square mile (454.5/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 90.65% White, 6.43% African American, 0.58% Native American, 0.64% Asian, 0.58% from other races, and 1.12% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.91% of the population.[33][34]

There were 708 households, out of which 36.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 63.1% were married couples living together, 8.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.6% were non-families. 21.3% of all households were made up of individuals, and 5.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.66 and the average family size was 3.13.[33][34]

In the borough the population was spread out, with 26.7% under the age of 18, 5.2% from 18 to 24, 32.5% from 25 to 44, 25.8% from 45 to 64, and 9.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females, there were 89.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.9 males.[33][34]

The median income for a household in the borough was $71,193, and the median income for a family was $79,843. Males had a median income of $55,441 versus $38,667 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $29,455. About 1.0% of families and 2.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.6% of those under age 18 and 2.1% of those age 65 or over.[33][34]

Government

Local government

Allentown is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government, which is used in 218 municipalities (of the 565) statewide, making it the most common form of government in New Jersey.[36] The governing body is comprised of the Mayor and the Borough Council, with all positions elected at-large on a partisan basis as part of the November general election. The Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council is comprised of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year in a three-year cycle.[6] The Borough form of government used by Allentown is a "weak mayor / strong council" government in which council members act as the legislative body with the mayor presiding at meetings and voting only in the event of a tie. The mayor can veto ordinances subject to an override by a two-thirds majority vote of the council. The mayor makes committee and liaison assignments for council members, and most appointments are made by the mayor with the advice and consent of the council.[37][38]

As of 2020, the Mayor of Allentown is Independent Thomas C. Fritts, whose term of office ends December 31, 2023. Members of the Borough Council are Council President Robert Strovinsky (I, 2021), Angela Anthony (D, 2020), Michael Drennan (I, 2021), John A. Elder III (20), Martha A. Johnson (I, 2022) and Daniel Payson (I, 2022).[3][39][40][41][42][43]

Federal, state and county representation

Allentown is located in the 4th Congressional district[44] and is part of New Jersey's 12th state legislative district.[9][45][46] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Allentown had been in the 30th state legislative district.[47]

For the 116th United States Congress, New Jersey's Fourth Congressional District is represented by Chris Smith (R, Hamilton Township).[48][49] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Democrats Cory Booker (Newark, term ends 2021)[50] and Bob Menendez (Paramus, term ends 2025).[51][52]

For the 2018-2019 session (Senate, General Assembly), the 12th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Samuel D. Thompson (R, Old Bridge Township) and in the General Assembly by Robert D. Clifton (R, Matawan) and Ronald S. Dancer (R, Plumsted Township).[53][54]

Monmouth County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders consisting of five members who are elected at-large to serve three year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats up for election each year as part of the November general election. At an annual reorganization meeting held in the beginning of January, the board selects one of its members to serve as Director and another as Deputy Director.[55] As of 2020, Monmouth County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Thomas A. Arnone (R, Neptune City, term as freeholder ends December 31, 2022; term as freeholder director ends 2021),[56] Freeholder Deputy Director Susan M. Kiley (R, Hazlet Township, term as freeholder ends December 31, 2021; term as deputy freeholder director ends 2021),[57]Lillian G. Burry (R, Colts Neck Township, 2020),[58] Nick DiRocco (R, Wall Township, 2022),[59] and Patrick G. Impreveduto (R, Holmdel Township, 2020)[60].

Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County clerk Christine Giordano Hanlon (R, 2020; Ocean Township),[61][62]Sheriff Shaun Golden (R, 2022; Howell Township),[63][64] and Surrogate Rosemarie D. Peters (R, 2021; Middletown Township).[65][66]

Politics

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 1,255 registered voters in Allentown, of which 327 (26.1%) were registered as Democrats, 340 (27.1%) were registered as Republicans and 586 (46.7%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 2 voters registered to other parties.[67]

In the 2012 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 56.2% of the vote (540 cast), ahead of Republican Mitt Romney with 41.9% (403 votes), and other candidates with 1.9% (18 votes), among the 964 ballots cast by the borough's 1,312 registered voters (3 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 73.5%.[68][69] In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 54.7% of the vote (576 cast), ahead of Republican John McCain with 42.4% (446 votes) and other candidates with 1.4% (15 votes), among the 1,053 ballots cast by the borough's 1,334 registered voters, for a turnout of 78.9%.[70] In the 2004 presidential election, Democrat John Kerry received 49.3% of the vote (489 ballots cast), outpolling Republican George W. Bush with 49.2% (488 votes) and other candidates with 0.8% (11 votes), among the 991 ballots cast by the borough's 1,317 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 75.2.[71]

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 61.7% of the vote (436 cast), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 36.6% (259 votes), and other candidates with 1.7% (12 votes), among the 718 ballots cast by the borough's 1,319 registered voters (11 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 54.4%.[72][73] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 54.7% of the vote (397 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 36.8% (267 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 6.7% (49 votes) and other candidates with 1.1% (8 votes), among the 726 ballots cast by the borough's 1,283 registered voters, yielding a 56.6% turnout.[74]

Education

Students in public school for kindergarten through twelfth grade attend the schools of the Upper Freehold Regional School District, together with students from Upper Freehold Township.[75]Millstone Township sends students to the district's high school as part of a sending/receiving relationship with the Millstone Township Schools.[76] As of the 2017-18 school year, the district, comprised of three schools, had an enrollment of 2,300 students and 196.1 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student-teacher ratio of 11.7:1.[77] Schools in the district (with 2017-18 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[78]) are Newell Elementary School[79] with 513 students in pre-kindergarten through 4th grade, Stone Bridge Middle School[80] with 518 students in grades 5 - 8 and Allentown High School[81] with 1,245 students in grades 9 - 12.[82][83] The operations of the district are overseen by a nine-member board of education, with the board's trustees elected directly by voters to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with three seats up for election each year.[84] The nine seats are allocated to the two constituent municipalities based on population, with five assigned to Upper Freehold Township and four to Allentown.[85]

Transportation

CR's 524, 526 and 539 converge in downtown Allentown

As of May 2010, the borough had a total of 6.84 miles (11.01 km) of roadways, of which 4.55 miles (7.32 km) were maintained by the municipality and 2.29 miles (3.69 km) by Monmouth County.[86]

The only major roads that pass through are CR 524, CR 526 and CR 539.

Limited access roads that are accessible just outside the borough include Interstate 195 and the New Jersey Turnpike (Interstate 95).

Allentown is about one hour southwest of Manhattan via the Turnpike and about 50 minutes northeast of Philadelphia. Both Princeton and Trenton are easily accessible from Allentown via I-195.

Notable people

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Allentown include:

References

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  85. ^ Upper Freehold Regional Board of Education District Policy 0141.2 - Board Member And Term - Receiving District, Upper Freehold Regional School District. Accessed March 17, 2020. "The Board of Education shall consist of 10 members (4 Allentown Borough, 5 Upper Freehold Township, 1 member shall represent the Millstone community as an AHS representative). The term shall be 3 years for each of the Allentown and Upper Freehold representatives. The Millstone Board member is selected by the Millstone Board of Education."
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External links


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