Alexander Whitelaw
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Alexander Whitelaw

Alexander Whitelaw
Member of Parliament for Glasgow

1884-1889
Robert Dalglish
Charles Tennant
Personal details
Born1823
Drumpark, Monklands, Scotland
Died1879
Political partyConservative

Alexander Whitelaw (1823-1879) was a Scottish ironmaster, philanthropist[1] and Conservative Member of Parliament (MP) for Glasgow from 1874 until his death.

Life

Whitelaw was born in 1823 in Drumpark in Monklands and was educated at Grange School, Sunderland and then took some time to study mining.[2] In 1846 he married Barbara Forbes Lockhart of Cambusnethan which established a marital connection to the Baird family.[3] The Baird family founded the iron smelting firm of William Baird & Co., in which Whitelaw became a managing partner. The Baird family acquired the Gartsherrie coal fields in 1826 and the mansion and estate in 1834.[4]

Through his philanthropy, he left endowments to churches and schools, including helping to found the Gartsherrie Academy,[1] and for the 1863-1864 session he was Vice President of the Academy.[5] Whitelaw's interest in education led him to become Chairman of the Glasgow School Board in 1873. One cartoon shows him having administered a thrashing to John Page Hopps, a fellow Board member with whom he had clashed.[1]

In 1863, Whitelaw is recorded in the "Curler's Annual" as being the President of the Coatbridge Cricket Club.[5]

Whitelaw was a Conservative and represented Glasgow as an MP from 1874 until his death in 1879.

References

  1. ^ a b c "Alexander Whitelaw". The Glasgow Story. Retrieved 2014.
  2. ^ "Alexander Whitelaw". Glasgow West-end Addresses and their Occupants: 1836-1915. Retrieved 2014.
  3. ^ Miller, Andrew. "The Rise And Progress Of Coatbridge And Surrounding Neighbourhood". Scottish Mining Website. Retrieved 2014.
  4. ^ "Gartsherrie House". The Glasgow Story. Retrieved 2014.
  5. ^ a b Miller, Andrew. "The Rise And Progress Of Coatbridge And Surrounding Neighbourhood". Scottish Mining Website. Retrieved 2014.

External links


  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

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