Aizuwakamatsu
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Aizuwakamatsu
Aizuwakamatsu

Aizuwakamatsu skyline
Aizuwakamatsu skyline
Flag of Aizuwakamatsu
Flag
Official seal of Aizuwakamatsu
Seal
Location of Aizuwakamatsu in Fukushima Prefecture
Location of Aizuwakamatsu in Fukushima Prefecture
Aizuwakamatsu is located in Japan
Aizuwakamatsu
Aizuwakamatsu
 
Coordinates: 37°29?41.4?N 139°55?47.1?E / 37.494833°N 139.929750°E / 37.494833; 139.929750Coordinates: 37°29?41.4?N 139°55?47.1?E / 37.494833°N 139.929750°E / 37.494833; 139.929750
CountryJapan
RegionT?hoku
PrefectureFukushima
Government
 o MayorIchir? Kanke
Area
 o Total382.97 km2 (147.87 sq mi)
Population
(March 1, 2020)
 o Total119,232
 o Density310/km2 (810/sq mi)
Time zoneUTC+9 (Japan Standard Time)
- TreeJapanese Red Pine
- FlowerCommon Hollyhock
- BirdCommon cuckoo
Phone number0242-39-1111
Address3-46 Higashisakaemachi, Aizuwakamatsu-shi, Fukushima-ken 965-8601
WebsiteOfficial website
Aizuwakamatsu City Hall
Higashiyama Onsen

Aizuwakamatsu (, Aizuwakamatsu-shi) is a city in Fukushima Prefecture, Japan. As of 1 March 2020, the city had an estimated population of 119,232 in 50,128 households,[1] and a population density of 310 persons per km2. The total area of the city was 382.97 square kilometres (147.87 sq mi).

Geography

Mount Iimori

Aizuwakamatsu is located in the western part of Fukushima Prefecture, in the southeast part of Aizu basin.

Mountains

Rivers

Lakes

Hot springs

Administrative divisions

There are 11 administrative divisions (hamlets or (ooaza)) in the city.[2]

  • Wakamatsu
  • Machikita
  • Kouya
  • Kouzashi
  • Monden
  • Ikki
  • Higashiyama
  • ?to
  • Minato
  • Kitaaizu
  • Kawahigashi

Neighboring municipalities

Fukushima Prefecture

Demographics

Per Japanese census data,[3] the population of Aizuwakamatsu has not increased over the past 40 years.

Climate

Aizuwakamatsu has a hot-summer Humid continental climate (Köppen Dfa) characterized by warm summers and cold winters with heavy snowfall. Although it is located in an inland valley, Aizuwakamatsu's climate resembles that of the Hokuriku region on the Sea of Japan coast. Snowfall is very heavy during the winter at 4.78 metres (190 in), and snow cover reaches an average maximum of 0.39 metres (15.35 in) and has reached as much as 1.15 metres (45.3 in) for short periods, a figure one would usually associate with much colder regions like the Labrador Peninsula. The average annual temperature in Aizuwakamatsu is 11.2 °C. The average annual rainfall is 1270 mm with September as the wettest month. The temperatures are highest on average in August, at around 24.7 °C, and lowest in January, at around -1.2 °C.[4]

Climate data for Aizuwakamatsu, Fukushima (1981~2010)
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °C (°F) 13.1
(55.6)
15.9
(60.6)
22.8
(73.0)
30.5
(86.9)
33.3
(91.9)
34.3
(93.7)
36.7
(98.1)
38.1
(100.6)
35.4
(95.7)
30.9
(87.6)
24.5
(76.1)
20.9
(69.6)
38.1
(100.6)
Average high °C (°F) 2.6
(36.7)
3.6
(38.5)
8.2
(46.8)
16.4
(61.5)
22.1
(71.8)
25.4
(77.7)
28.6
(83.5)
30.6
(87.1)
25.6
(78.1)
19.0
(66.2)
11.8
(53.2)
5.7
(42.3)
16.7
(62.1)
Average low °C (°F) -3.7
(25.3)
-3.6
(25.5)
-1
(30)
4.2
(39.6)
10.0
(50.0)
15.5
(59.9)
19.5
(67.1)
20.6
(69.1)
16.3
(61.3)
9.2
(48.6)
3.1
(37.6)
-0.9
(30.4)
7.4
(45.3)
Record low °C (°F) -14.4
(6.1)
-15.2
(4.6)
-11.9
(10.6)
-4.6
(23.7)
-1.2
(29.8)
6.9
(44.4)
9.1
(48.4)
10.3
(50.5)
4.8
(40.6)
-1.5
(29.3)
-5.9
(21.4)
-14.4
(6.1)
-15.2
(4.6)
Average precipitation mm (inches) 95.3
(3.75)
71.4
(2.81)
71.7
(2.82)
64.3
(2.53)
80.0
(3.15)
110.8
(4.36)
175.8
(6.92)
134.3
(5.29)
136.9
(5.39)
100.1
(3.94)
78.9
(3.11)
93.8
(3.69)
1,213.3
(47.76)
Average snowfall cm (inches) 171
(67)
142
(56)
66
(26)
5
(2.0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
6
(2.4)
83
(33)
473
(186.4)
Average precipitation days 18.7 16.2 16.8 12.0 11.4 12.4 14.8 11.0 12.9 12.9 15.1 17.5 171.7
Average snowy days 27.0 24.3 12.3 0.8 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1.0 12.4 77.8
Average relative humidity (%) 82 79 74 67 68 73 78 76 79 80 82 83 77
Mean monthly sunshine hours 78.5 98.8 138.2 172.7 193.6 161.9 159.8 198.7 132.1 121.1 86.8 70.7 1,612.9
Source 1: Japan Meteorological Agency[5]
Source 2: Japan Meteorological Agency (records)[6]

History

The area of present-day Aizuwakamatsu was part of ancient Mutsu Province, and was settled from prehistoric times. The Aizu-Otsuka Kofun within the city borders dates from the 4th century AD, and is an Important Cultural Property.

According to legend, in 88 BCE, Emperor Sujin sent two generals; Ohiko and Takenukawa-wake to the T?hoku region for the purpose of establishing peace after the quashing of a rebellion in the region.[7]

Before the late 12th century, Aizuwakamatsu was mainly a market town and a base for regional warlords. Starting in 1192, Aizuwakamatsu became part of the regions that were controlled by the Kamakura shogunate. Soon after taking power, Yoritomo granted a samurai named Suwara Yoshitsura (from the Miura clan) all of Aizu. A descendant of Suwara, Ashina Morinori, began construction of the first castle in the city in 1384.[7] During the Sengoku period the final lord of Aizu, Ashina Moritaka, died in 1583 and soon the Ashina clan lost power. After the Satake clan took control of the castle, they placed a twelve-year-old member of their clan who was renamed Ashina Morishige and proclaimed lord of Aizu. The Ashina clan regained control of Aizu for a brief time in 1589 with the help of Date Masamune. However, Masamune took over the domain for himself soon after. He surrendered in 1590 to Toyotomi Hideyoshi. Toyotomi gave Aizu to one of his allies, Gamo Ujisato who then began construction in 1592 of a new castle at the site. It was during this time that the town was renamed "Wakamatsu" (young pine).[7]

During the Edo period, Aizu was controlled briefly by Uesugi Kagekatsu in 1600 after the death of Gamo Ujisato in 1596. Tokugawa Ieyasu accused Uesugi of gathering troops in Aizu. Ieyasu then transferred the Uesugi to Yonezawa. Through inheritance, Aizu was passed to Hoshina Masayuki (a brother of the third Tokugawa shogun) in 1643. The Edo period saw the economic and cultural growth of Aizu.[7]

Aizu Domain was the location of the Battle of Aizu, one of the largest conflicts of the Boshin War. After the Meiji Restoration, Wakamatsu Town was created with the establishment of the modern municipalities system on April 1, 1889. It became Wakamatsu City in 1899. On April 1, 1937, a part of Machikita village (from Kitaaizu District) was merged into the city of Wakamatsu. The remained was annexed on April 1, 1951. The name of the city was changed to Aizuwakamatsu on January 1, 1955 when Wakamatsu merged with seven villages of Kitaaizu District (Kouya, Kouzashi, Monden, Ikki, Higashiyama, ?to and Minato).[]. A part of the town of Hong? (locality of Oya) (from ?numa District) was merged into Aizuwakamatsu on April 1, 1955.

Aizuwakamatsu further expanded by annexing the village of Kitaaizu (from Kitaaizu District) on November 1, 2004 and the town of Kawahigashi (from Kawanuma District) on November 1, 2005.[]

Government

Aizuwakamatsu has a mayor-council form of government with a directly elected mayor and a unicameral city legislature of 29 members[8] The city contributes four members to the Fukushima Prefectural Assembly. In terms of national politics, the city is part of Fukushima Electoral District 4 for the lower house of the Diet of Japan.

Economy

Aizuwakamatsu is a local commercial center. The area is traditionally noted for sake brewing and lacquerware. Modern industries include textiles, wood processing and electronics.[9]

Education

Aizuwakamatsu has one prefectural university and a private junior college. The city has 19 public elementary school and 11 public junior high schools operated by the city government. In addition, the is one private elementary school and one private junior high school. The Fukushima Prefectural Board of Education operates five public high schools and one combined junior/senior high school. The prefecture also operates two special education schools.

Universities and colleges

Senior high schools

Public (prefectural)

  • Aizu High School ()
  • Aoi High School ()
  • Aizu Gakuh? High School ()
  • Wakamatsu Sh?gy? High School ()
  • Aizu K?gy? High School ()
  • Aizu Second High School ()

Private

  • Aizuwakamatsu Xaverio Gakuen High School ()
  • Wakamatsu 1st High School ()
  • Jinai High School ()

Junior high schools

Public (municipal)

  • Aizuwakamatsu First Junior High School ()
  • Aizuwakamatsu Second Junior High School ()
  • Aizuwakamatsu Third Junior High School ()
  • Aizuwakamatsu Fourth Junior High School ()
  • Aizuwakamatsu Fifth Junior High School ()
  • Aizuwakamatsu Sixth Junior High School ()
  • Ikki Junior High School ()
  • ?to Junior High School ()
  • Minato Junior High School (?)
  • Kitaaizu Junior High School ()
  • Kawahigashi Junior High School ()
  • Aizu Gakuh? Junior High School (?, prefectural)
    • Note: All junior high schools are municipal except for Aizu Gakuh? Junior High School.

Private

  • Aizuwakamatsu Xaverio Gakuen Junior High School (?)

Transportation

Railway

JR logo (east).svg JR East - Banetsu West Line

JR logo (east).svg JR East - Tadami Line

Aizu Tetsudo logo 1.png Aizu Railway - Aizu Line

Highway

Media

Television

Newspapers

  • Fukushima Mimp?
  • Fukushima Min-Y?

Radio

  • FM Aizu

Sister city relations

Japanese sister cities

International sister cities

Local attractions

Aizuwakamatsu Castle

Culture

Festivals

  • Aizu Festival

Foods

  • Kozuyu
  • Sauce Katsu-don
  • Basashi (horse sashimi)
  • Soba
  • Boutara
  • Sake

Others

Notable people from Aizuwakamatsu

References

  1. ^ Aizuwakamatsu city official statistics(in Japanese)
  2. ^ ? Archived 2011-07-26 at the Wayback Machine (in Japanese)
  3. ^ Aizuwakamatsu population statistics
  4. ^ Aizuwakamatsu climate data
  5. ^ "(?)". Japan Meteorological Agency. Retrieved .
  6. ^ "?1~10()". Japan Meteorological Agency. Retrieved .
  7. ^ a b c d Schellinger, Paul; Salkin, Robert, eds. (1996). International Dictionary of Historic Places, Volume 5: Asia and Oceania. Chicago: Fitzroy Dearborn Publishers. p. 10. ISBN 1-884964-04-4.
  8. ^ Aizuwakamatsu city council home page Archived 2019-07-24 at the Wayback Machine(in Japanese)
  9. ^ Campbell, Allen; Nobel, David S (1993). Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia. Kodansha. p. 24. ISBN 406205938X.
  10. ^ Hubei provincial government site

External links


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Aizuwakamatsu
 



 



 
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