Aamu
Get Aamu essential facts below. View Videos or join the Aamu discussion. Add Aamu to your PopFlock.com topic list for future reference or share this resource on social media.
Aamu
Procession of the Aamu
A group of West Asiatic foreigners, possibly Canaanites, labelled as Aamu (mw), including the leading man with a Nubian ibex labelled as Abisha the Hyksos ( -sw, Heqa-kasut for "Hyksos"). Tomb of 12th-dynasty official Khnumhotep II, who served under Senusret III, at Beni Hasan c. 1900 BCE.[1][2][3][4]
The leader of the Aamu in the painting is a man described as "Abisha the Hyksos"
( -swt, Heqa-kasut for "Hyksos").
Tomb of Khnumhotep II (circa 1900 BC).[1]
D36G1G17G43
Aamu
in hieroglyphs

Aamu (Egyptian language: '?' mw) was an Egyptian name used to designate Western Asiatic foreigners in antiquity.[1] It is generally translated as "Western Asiatic", but suggestions have been made these could be identical with the Canaanites or the Amorites.[1][2]

Abraham could have been related to the Western Asian people known to have visited Egypt during the second millennium BCE, such as the Aamu or Retjenu.[5]David Rohl proposed to identify Abraham with the Aamu, well-known in Egyptian sources as a people of West Asia.[6] In Egyptian, the reading of the second aleph, when there are two consecutive alephs in a word, change to "r" or "l", so that the word Aamu, which has traditionally been suspected to mean Amorites, may actually be read "Aramu", referring to the Arameans, and associated to Abraham through the name given to him in the Bible, "Abraham the wandering Aramaean".[6]Assuming a shift to "l" as opposed to "r", the reading "Alamu" is ostensibly similar to the Ahlamu, a people whom the Aramean tribes belonged to.[]

An ancient Egyptian painting in the tomb of 12th Dynasty official Khnumhotep II, at Beni Hasan (c. 1900 BCE), shows a group of West Asiatic foreigners, possibly Canaanites, labelled as Aamu (mw), including the leading man with a Nubian ibex labelled "Abisha the Hyksos" ( -sw, Heqa-kasut for "Hyksos").[1][2][3][7] The Aamu from this relief are further labeled as being from the area of Shu, which may be identified, with some uncertainty, with the area of Moab in southern Palestine (region), around the Jordan river, or generally the southern Levant, just east of the Jordan river and the Red Sea.[8]

References

  1. ^ a b c d e Mieroop, Marc Van De (2010). A History of Ancient Egypt. John Wiley & Sons. p. 131. ISBN 978-1-4051-6070-4.
  2. ^ a b c Bard, Kathryn A. (2015). An Introduction to the Archaeology of Ancient Egypt. John Wiley & Sons. p. 188. ISBN 978-1-118-89611-2.
  3. ^ a b Curry, Andrew (2018). "The Rulers of Foreign Lands - Archaeology Magazine". www.archaeology.org.
  4. ^ Kamrin, Janice (2009). "The Aamu of Shu in the Tomb of Khnumhotep II at Beni Hassan" (PDF). Journal of Ancient Egyptian Interconnections. Vol. 1:3.
  5. ^ Najovits, Simson (2003). Egypt, the Trunk of the Tree, Vol.II: A Modern Survey of and Ancient Land. Algora Publishing. p. 195. ISBN 978-0-87586-257-6.
  6. ^ a b Rohl, David (2010). The Lords Of Avaris. Random House. p. 196. ISBN 978-1-4070-1092-2.
  7. ^ Kamrin, Janice (2009). "The Aamu of Shu in the Tomb of Khnumhotep II at Beni Hassan" (PDF). Journal of Ancient Egyptian Interconnections. Vol. 1:3.
  8. ^ Kamrin, Janice (2009). "The Aamu of Shu in the Tomb of Khnumhotep II at Beni Hassan" (PDF). Journal of Ancient Egyptian Interconnections. Vol. 1:3: 25.



  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

Aamu
 



 



 
Music Scenes