2020 Democratic Party Presidential Primaries
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2020 Democratic Party Presidential Primaries

2020 Democratic Party presidential primaries

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1,885 of 3,769[a] pledged delegate votes needed to win the presidential nomination at the convention's first ballot.[1]
(2,268 of all 4,535[b] delegate votes needed to win any subsequent ballots at a contested convention)[1]

Previous Democratic nominee

Hillary Clinton



The 2020 Democratic Party presidential primaries and caucuses will be a series of electoral contests organized by the Democratic Party to select the approximately 3,769[a] pledged delegates to the Democratic National Convention. Those delegates shall, by pledged votes, elect the Democratic nominee for president of the United States in the 2020 U.S. presidential election.[2] The elections are scheduled to take place from February to June 2020 in all fifty U.S. states, the District of Columbia, five U.S. territories, and Democrats Abroad.

Independently of the result of primaries and caucuses, the Democratic Party will, from its group of party leaders and elected officials, also appoint 765[b] unpledged delegates (superdelegates) to participate in its national convention. In contrast to all previous election cycles, superdelegates will no longer have the right to cast decisive votes at the convention's first ballot for the presidential nomination (limiting their voting rights to either non-decisive votes on the first ballot or decisive votes for subsequent ballots on a contested convention).[2][3][4]

The field of major Democratic presidential candidates in the 2020 election peaked at more than two dozen. As of November 20, 2019, 17 major candidates are seeking the Democratic presidential nomination in 2020. The October 15, 2019, Democratic presidential debate in Westerville, Ohio, featured 12 candidates, setting a record for the highest number of candidates in one presidential debate.

Background

After Hillary Clinton's loss in the previous election, many felt the Democratic Party lacked a clear leader.[5] Divisions remained in the party following the 2016 primaries, which pitted Clinton against Bernie Sanders.[6][7] Between the 2016 election and the 2018 midterm elections, Senate Democrats have generally shifted to the political left in relation to college tuition, healthcare, and immigration.[8][9] The 2018 elections saw the Democratic Party regain the House of Representatives for the first time in eight years, picking up seats in both urban and suburban districts.[10][11]

Soon after the 2016 general election, the division between Clinton and Sanders supporters was highlighted in the 2017 Democratic National Committee chairmanship election between Tom Perez and Keith Ellison.[12] Perez was narrowly elected chairman and subsequently appointed Ellison as the Deputy Chair, a largely ceremonial role.[8][9]

The 2020 field of Democratic presidential candidates peaked at more than two dozen candidates. According to Politifact, this field is believed to be the largest field of presidential candidates for any American political party since 1972;[c] it exceeds the field of 17 major candidates that sought the Republican presidential nomination in 2016.[14] In May 2019, CBS News referred to the field of 2020 Democratic presidential candidates as "the largest and most diverse Democratic primary field in modern history", including at least six female presidential candidates.[15] As of October 24, 2019, 18 major candidates are seeking the Democratic presidential nomination in 2020.[16]

Reforms since 2016

On August 25, 2018, the Democratic National Committee (DNC) members passed reforms to the Democratic Party's primary process in order to increase participation[17] and ensure transparency.[18] State parties are encouraged to use a government-run primary whenever available and increase the accessibility of their primary through same-day or automatic registration and same-day party switching. Caucuses are required to have absentee voting, or to otherwise allow those who cannot participate in person to be included.[17]

The new reforms also regulate how the Democratic National Convention shall handle the outcome of primaries and caucuses for three potential scenarios:[2][4]

  1. If a single candidate wins at least 2,268 pledged delegates: Superdelegates will be allowed to vote at first ballot, as their influence can not overturn the majority of pledged delegates.
  2. If a single candidate wins 1,886-2,267 pledged delegates: Superdelegates will be barred from voting at first ballot, which solely will be decided by the will of pledged delegates.
  3. If no candidate wins more than 1,885 pledged delegates: This will result in a contested convention, where superdelegates are barred from voting at the first formal ballot, but regain their right to vote for their preferred presidential nominee for all subsequent ballots needed until the delegates reach a majority.

The reforms mandate that superdelegates refrain from voting on the first presidential nominating ballot, unless a candidate via the outcome of primaries and caucuses already has gained enough votes (more than 50% of all delegate votes) among only the elected pledged delegates. The prohibition for superdelegates to vote at the first ballot for the last two mentioned scenarios, does not preclude superdelegates from publicly endorsing a candidate of their choosing before the convention.[4]

In a contested convention where no majority of minimum 1,886 pledged delegate votes is found for a single candidate in the first ballot, all superdelegates will then regain their right to vote on any subsequent ballot necessary in order for a presidential candidate to be nominated (raising the majority needed for such to 2,267 votes).[2][4]

Candidates

Major candidates in the 2020 Democratic presidential primaries have either: (a) served as Vice President, a member of the cabinet, a U.S. Senator, a U.S. Representative, or a Governor, (b) been included in a minimum of five independent national polls, or (c) received substantial media coverage.[19][20][21][22][23][24]

More than 250 candidates who did not meet the criteria to be deemed major candidates also filed with the Federal Election Commission to run for president in the Democratic Party primary.[25]

  Candidate not officially announced but formed a presidential committee

Current candidates

The following list of current candidates includes major candidates that have filed with the Federal Election Commission to run for president in the 2020 Democratic primary, have officially announced their respective candidacies, and have not withdrawn their candidacies. As of November 20, 2019, the total number of current major candidates is 17, five of whom are female, four of whom are less than 50 years old, and three of whom are 70 years or older.


Name Born Experience Home state Campaign
Announcement date
Ref.
Michael Bennet by Gage Skidmore.jpg
Michael Bennet
November 28, 1964
(age 54)
New Delhi, India
U.S. senator from Colorado (2009-present) Flag of Colorado.svg
Colorado
Michael Bennet 2020 presidential campaign logo.svg
Campaign
Campaign: May 2, 2019
FEC filing[26]
[27]

Joe Biden
November 20, 1942
(age 77)
Scranton, Pennsylvania
Vice President of the United States (2009-2017)
U.S. senator from Delaware (1973-2009)
Candidate for President in 1988 and 2008
Flag of Delaware.svg
Delaware
Joe Biden 2020 presidential campaign logo.svg
Campaign
Campaign: April 25, 2019
FEC filing[28]
[29]

Michael Bloomberg
February 14, 1942
(age 77)
Brighton, Massachusetts
CEO of Bloomberg L.P.
Former Mayor of New York City (2002-2013)
Flag of New York.svg
New York
Exploratory committee: November 21, 2019 [30]
Cory Booker by Gage Skidmore.jpg
Cory Booker
April 27, 1969
(age 50)
Washington, D.C.
U.S. senator from New Jersey (2013-present)
Mayor of Newark, New Jersey (2006-2013)
Flag of New Jersey.svg
New Jersey
Cory Booker 2020 Logo.svg
Campaign
Campaign: February 1, 2019
FEC filing[31]
[32]
Steve Bullock by Gage Skidmore.jpg
Steve Bullock
April 11, 1966
(age 53)
Missoula, Montana
Governor of Montana (2013-present)
Attorney General of Montana (2009-2013)
Flag of Montana.svg
Montana
Steve Bullock 2020 presidential campaign logo.svg
Campaign
Campaign: May 14, 2019
FEC filing[33]
[34][35]
Pete Buttigieg by Gage Skidmore.jpg
Pete Buttigieg
January 19, 1982
(age 37)
South Bend, Indiana
Mayor of South Bend, Indiana (2012-present) Flag of Indiana.svg
Indiana
Pete for America logo (Strato Blue).svg
Campaign
Exploratory committee: January 23, 2019
Campaign: April 14, 2019

FEC filing[36]
[37]
Julian Castro 2019 crop.jpg
Julián Castro
September 16, 1974
(age 45)
San Antonio, Texas
Secretary of Housing and Urban Development (2014-2017)
Mayor of San Antonio, Texas (2009-2014)
Flag of Texas.svg
Texas
Julian Castro 2020 presidential campaign logo.svg
Campaign
Exploratory committee:
December 12, 2018
Campaign: January 12, 2019

FEC filing[38]
[39]
John Delaney 2019 crop.jpg
John Delaney
April 16, 1963
(age 56)
Wood-Ridge, New Jersey
U.S. representative from MD-06 (2013-2019) Flag of Maryland.svg
Maryland
John Delaney 2020 logo.svg
Campaign
Campaign: July 28, 2017
FEC filing[40]
[41]
Tulsi Gabbard August 2019.jpg
Tulsi Gabbard
April 12, 1981
(age 38)
Leloaloa, American Samoa
U.S. representative from HI-02 (2013-present) Flag of Hawaii.svg
Hawaii
Tulsi Gabbard 2020 presidential campaign logo black.svg
Campaign
Campaign: January 11, 2019
FEC filing[42]
[43]
Kamala Harris April 2019.jpg
Kamala Harris
October 20, 1964
(age 55)
Oakland, California
U.S. senator from California (2017-present)
Attorney General of California (2011-2017)
Flag of California.svg
California
Kamala Harris 2020 presidential campaign logo.svg
Campaign
Campaign: January 21, 2019
FEC filing[44]
[45]
Amy Klobuchar 2019 (cropped).jpg
Amy Klobuchar
May 25, 1960
(age 59)
Plymouth, Minnesota
U.S. senator from Minnesota (2007-present) Flag of Minnesota.svg
Minnesota
Amy Klobuchar 2020 presidential campaign logo.svg
Campaign
Campaign: February 10, 2019
FEC filing[46]
[47]
Deval Patrick 2016.jpg
Deval Patrick
July 31, 1956
(age 63)
Chicago, Illinois
Governor of Massachusetts (2007-2015) Flag of Massachusetts.svg
Massachusetts
Devallogo2020.png
Campaign: November 14, 2019
FEC filing[48]
[49]
Bernie Sanders July 2019 (cropped).jpg
Bernie Sanders
September 8, 1941
(age 78)
Brooklyn, New York
U.S. senator from Vermont (2007-present)
U.S. representative from VT-AL (1991-2007)
Mayor of Burlington, Vermont (1981-1989)
Candidate for President in 2016
Flag of Vermont.svg
Vermont
Bernie Sanders 2020 logo.svg
Campaign
Campaign: February 19, 2019
FEC filing[50]
[51]
Joe Sestak (48641414726) (cropped).jpg
Joe Sestak
December 12, 1951
(age 67)
Secane, Pennsylvania
U.S. representative from PA-07 (2007-2011) Flag of Virginia.svg
Virginia

Campaign
Campaign: June 22, 2019
FEC filing[52]
[53]
Tom Steyer by Gage Skidmore.jpg
Tom Steyer
June 27, 1957
(age 62)
Manhattan, New York
Hedge fund manager
Founder of Farallon Capital, Beneficial State Bank, and NextGen America
Flag of California.svg
California
Tom Steyer 2020 logo (black text).svg
Campaign
Campaign: July 9, 2019
FEC filing[54]
[55]
Elizabeth Warren by Gage Skidmore.jpg
Elizabeth Warren
June 22, 1949
(age 70)
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
U.S. senator from Massachusetts (2013-present)
Special Advisor for the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (2010-2011)
Flag of Massachusetts.svg
Massachusetts
Elizabeth Warren 2020 presidential campaign logo.svg
Campaign
Exploratory committee:
December 31, 2018
Campaign: February 9, 2019

FEC filing[56]
[57]
Marianne Williamson (48541662667) (cropped).jpg
Marianne Williamson
July 8, 1952
(age 67)
Houston, Texas
Author
Founder of Project Angel Food
Independent candidate for U.S. House from CA-33 in 2014
Flag of Iowa.svg
Iowa
Marianne Williamson 2020 presidential campaign logo.svg
Campaign
Exploratory committee:
November 15, 2018
Campaign: January 28, 2019

FEC filing[58]
[59]
Andrew Yang by Gage Skidmore.jpg
Andrew Yang
January 13, 1975
(age 44)
Schenectady, New York
Entrepreneur
Founder of Venture for America
Flag of New York.svg
New York
Andrew Yang 2020 logo.png
Campaign
Campaign: November 6, 2017
FEC filing[60]
[61]

Other notable candidates who have not suspended their respective campaigns include:

On the ballot in at least one state

Not on the ballot anywhere

Withdrew before the primaries

The candidates in this section were major candidates who withdrew or suspended their campaigns before the 2020 Democratic primary elections began.

Candidate Born Experience State Campaign
announced
Campaign
suspended
Article Ref.
MAJ Richard Ojeda.jpg
Richard Ojeda
September 25, 1970
(age 48)
Rochester, Minnesota
West Virginia state senator from WV-SD07 (2016-2019) Flag of West Virginia.svg
West Virginia
November 11, 2018 January 25, 2019

Campaign
FEC filing[72]

[73][74]
Eric Swalwell (48016282941) (cropped).jpg
Eric Swalwell
November 16, 1980
(age 38)
Sac City, Iowa
U.S. representative from CA-15 (2013-present) Flag of California.svg
California
April 8, 2019 July 8, 2019
(running for re-election)
Eric Swalwell 2020 presidential campaign logo.svg
Campaign
FEC filing[75]
[76][77]

Mike Gravel
May 13, 1930
(age 89)
Springfield, Massachusetts
U.S. senator from Alaska (1969-1981)
Candidate for President in 2008
Flag of California.svg
California
April 2, 2019
Exploratory committee: March 19, 2019-
April 1, 2019
August 6, 2019
(co-endorsed Sanders and Gabbard)[78]
Gravel Mg web logo line two color.svg
Campaign
FEC filing[79]
[80][78]
John Hickenlooper by Gage Skidmore.jpg
John Hickenlooper
February 7, 1952
(age 67)
Narberth, Pennsylvania
Governor of Colorado (2011-2019)
Mayor of Denver, Colorado (2003-2011)
Flag of Colorado.svg
Colorado
March 4, 2019 August 15, 2019
(running for U.S. Senate)[81]
John Hickenlooper 2020 presidential campaign logo.png
Campaign
FEC filing[82]
[83][84]
Jay Inslee by Gage Skidmore.jpg
Jay Inslee
February 9, 1951
(age 68)
Seattle, Washington
Governor of Washington (2013-present)
U.S. representative from WA-01 (1999-2012)
Flag of Washington.svg
Washington
March 1, 2019 August 21, 2019
(running for re-election)[85]

Campaign
FEC filing[86]
[87][88]
Seth Moulton August 2019.jpg
Seth Moulton
October 24, 1978
(age 40)
Salem, Massachusetts
U.S. representative from MA-06 (2015-present) Flag of Massachusetts.svg
Massachusetts
April 22, 2019 August 23, 2019
(running for re-election)[89]

Campaign
FEC filing[90]
[91][92]
Kirsten Gillibrand August 2019.jpg
Kirsten Gillibrand
December 9, 1966
(age 52)
Albany, New York
U.S. senator from New York (2009-present)
U.S. representative from NY-20 (2007-2009)
Flag of New York.svg
New York
March 17, 2019
Exploratory committee: January 15, 2019-
March 16, 2019
August 28, 2019 Gillibrand 2020 logo.png
Campaign
FEC filing[93]
[94][95]
Bill de Blasio by Gage Skidmore.jpg
Bill de Blasio
May 8, 1961
(age 58)
Manhattan, New York
Mayor of New York City, New York (2014-present) Flag of New York.svg
New York
May 16, 2019 September 20, 2019 Bill de Blasio 2020 presidential campaign logo.svg
Campaign
FEC filing[96]
[97][98]
Tim Ryan (48639153698) (cropped).jpg
Tim Ryan
July 16, 1973
(age 46)
Niles, Ohio
U.S. representative from OH-13 (2013-present)
U.S. representative from OH-17 (2003-2013)
Flag of Ohio.svg
Ohio
April 4, 2019 October 24, 2019
(running for re-election, endorsed Biden)[99][100]

Timryan2020.png
Campaign
FEC filing[101]

[102][103]
Beto O'Rourke April 2019.jpg
Beto O'Rourke
September 26, 1972
(age 47)
El Paso, Texas
U.S. representative from TX-16 (2013-2019) Flag of Texas.svg
Texas
March 14, 2019 November 1, 2019 Beto O'Rourke 2020 presidential campaign logo.svg
Campaign

FEC filing[104]

[105][106]
Wayne Messam by Marc Nozell (cropped).jpg
Wayne Messam
June 7, 1974
(age 45)
South Bay, Florida
Mayor of Miramar, Florida (2015-present) Flag of Florida.svg
Florida
March 13, 2019 November 19, 2019 Wayne Messam 2020 presidential campaign logo.png
Campaign
Exploratory committee:
March 13, 2019
Campaign: March 28, 2019

FEC filing[107]
[108][109]

The following notable individuals who did not meet the criteria to become major candidates have terminated their campaigns:


Declined to be candidates

These individuals have been the subject of presidential speculation, but have publicly denied or recanted interest in running for president.


Political positions of candidates

Debates

In December 2018, the Democratic National Committee (DNC) announced the preliminary schedule for 12 official DNC-sanctioned debates, set to begin in June 2019, with six debates in 2019 and the remaining six during the first four months of 2020. Candidates are allowed to participate in forums featuring multiple other candidates as long as only one candidate appears on stage at a time; if candidates participate in any unsanctioned debate with other presidential candidates, they will lose their invitation to the next DNC-sanctioned debate.[192][193]

If any debates will be scheduled to take place with a location in the first four primary/caucus states (Iowa, New Hampshire, Nevada, and South Carolina), the DNC has decided such debates, at the earliest, will be held in 2020.[192] The DNC also announced that it would not partner with Fox News as a media sponsor for any debates.[194][195] Fox News had last held a Democratic debate in 2003.[196] All media sponsors selected to host a debate will as a new rule be required to appoint at least one female moderator for each debate, to ensure there will not be a gender skewed treatment of the candidates and debate topics.[197]

Debate schedule
Debate Date Time
(ET)
Viewers Location Sponsor(s) Moderator(s)
1A Jun. 26, 2019 9-11 p.m. ~24.3 million
(15.3m live TV; 9m streaming)[198]
Arsht Center,
Miami, Florida[199]
NBC News
MSNBC
Telemundo
Jose Diaz-Balart
Savannah Guthrie
Lester Holt
Rachel Maddow
Chuck Todd[200]
1B Jun. 27, 2019 9-11 p.m. ~27.1 million
(18.1m live TV; 9m streaming)[201]
2A Jul. 30, 2019 8-10:30 p.m. ~11.5 million
(8.7m live TV; 2.8m streaming)
Fox Theatre,
Detroit, Michigan[202]
CNN Dana Bash
Don Lemon
Jake Tapper
2B Jul. 31, 2019[203] 8-10:30 p.m. ~13.8 million
(10.7m live TV; 3.1m streaming)[204]
3 Sep. 12, 2019 8-11 p.m. 14.04 million live TV[205] Health and Physical Education Arena,
Texas Southern University,
Houston, Texas[206]
ABC News
Univision
Linsey Davis
David Muir
Jorge Ramos
George Stephanopoulos
4 Oct. 15, 2019[207] 8-11 p.m. 8.34 million live TV[208] Rike Physical Education Center,
Otterbein University,
Westerville, Ohio
CNN
The New York Times[209]
Erin Burnett
Anderson Cooper
Marc Lacey
5 Nov. 20, 2019[210] 9-11 p.m. TBA Oprah Winfrey sound stage,
Tyler Perry Studios,
Atlanta, Georgia[211]
MSNBC
The Washington Post
Rachel Maddow
Andrea Mitchell
Ashley Parker
Kristen Welker[212]
6 Dec. 19, 2019 TBA Gersten Pavilion,
Loyola Marymount University,
Los Angeles, California[213]
PBS
Politico
TBA
7 Jan.-Apr. 2020 TBA
8
9
10
11
12


Primary election polling

The following graph depicts the evolution of the standing of each candidate in the poll aggregators since December 2018.

Source of poll aggregation Date
updated
Dates
polled
Joe
Biden
Elizabeth
Warren
Bernie
Sanders
Pete
Buttigieg
Kamala
Harris
Andrew
Yang
Amy
Klobuchar
Others[e] Undecided[f]
270 to Win Nov 20, 2019 Nov 3-20, 2019[g] 28.0% 19.6% 18.4% 7.8% 4.2% 2.8% 1.8% 8.5%[h] 8.9%
RealClear Politics Nov 21, 2019 Nov 11-20, 2019 29.8% 18.5% 19.3% 7.8% 4.0% 2.8% 1.5% 10.3%[i] 6.0%
The Economist Nov 21, 2019 [j] 25.5% 21.5% 15.4% 8.1% 4.7% 3.3% 2.0% 6.7%[k] 12.8%
Average 27.8% 19.9% 17.7% 7.9% 4.3% 3.0% 1.8% 8.4%[l] 9.2%


Timeline

Richard Ojeda#2020 presidential campaignEric Swalwell 2020 presidential campaignMike Gravel 2020 presidential campaignJohn Hickenlooper 2020 presidential campaignJay Inslee 2020 presidential campaignSeth Moulton 2020 presidential campaignKirsten Gillibrand 2020 presidential campaignBill de Blasio 2020 presidential campaignTim Ryan 2020 presidential campaignBeto O'Rourke 2020 presidential campaignWayne Messam 2020 presidential campaignAndrew Yang 2020 presidential campaignMarianne Williamson 2020 presidential campaignElizabeth Warren 2020 presidential campaignTom Steyer 2020 presidential campaignJoe Sestak 2020 presidential campaignBernie Sanders 2020 presidential campaignDeval Patrick 2020 presidential campaignAmy Klobuchar 2020 presidential campaignKamala Harris 2020 presidential campaignTulsi Gabbard 2020 presidential campaignJohn Delaney 2020 presidential campaignJulián Castro 2020 presidential campaignPete Buttigieg 2020 presidential campaignSteve Bullock 2020 presidential campaignCory Booker 2020 presidential campaignJoe Biden 2020 presidential campaignMichael Bennet 2020 presidential campaign
Active
campaign
Exploratory
committee
Withdrawn
candidate
Midterm
elections
Debate
Iowa
caucuses
Super
Tuesday
Democratic
convention

2017

John Delaney was the first major candidate to announce his campaign, two and a half years before the 2020 Iowa caucus.

In the weeks following the election of Donald Trump in the 2016 election, media speculation regarding potential candidates for the 2020 Democratic Party presidential primaries began to circulate. As the Senate began confirmation hearings for members of the cabinet, speculation centered on the prospects of the "hell-no caucus", six senators who went on to vote against the majority of Trump's nominees. According to Politico, the members of the "hell-no caucus" were Cory Booker, Kamala Harris, Kirsten Gillibrand, Bernie Sanders, Jeff Merkley, and Elizabeth Warren.[214][215] Other speculation centered on then-Vice-President Joe Biden making a third presidential bid following failed attempts in 1988 and 2008. Biden had previously served as U.S. senator from Delaware (1973-2009).[216]

2018

Entrepreneur Andrew Yang was the second major Democratic candidate to announce his campaign.

In August 2018, Democratic Party officials and television networks began discussions as to the nature and scheduling of the following year's debates and the nomination process.[219] Changes were made to the role of superdelegates, deciding to only allow them to vote on the first ballot if the nomination is uncontested.[220] The Democratic National Committee (DNC) announced the preliminary schedule for the 12 official DNC-sanctioned debates, set to begin in June 2019, with six debates in 2019 and the remaining six during the first four months of 2020.

On November 6, 2018, the 2018 midterm elections were held. The election was widely characterized as a "blue wave" election. Mass canvassing, voter registration drives and deep engagement techniques drove turnout high. Despite this, eventual presidential candidates U.S. Representative Beto O'Rourke of Texas and State Senator Richard Ojeda of West Virginia both lost their respective races.[221]

August

  • August 25: The Democratic Party began planning debates[219] and eliminated first ballot decisive votes for superdelegates.[220]

November

December

2019

Rep. Tulsi Gabbard announced her candidacy on January 11, 2019.
Sen. Kamala Harris launched her bid on January 21, 2019.
Sen. Elizabeth Warren launched her bid on February 9, 2019
Sen. Bernie Sanders launched his second campaign on February 19, 2019.
Rep. Beto O'Rourke launched his bid on March 14, 2019.
Mayor Pete Buttigieg launched his campaign on April 14, 2019.
Former Vice President Joe Biden launched his third campaign on April 25, 2019.

January

February

March

April

May

June

July

August

September

October

November

December

  • December 12: This is the deadline to qualify for the sixth Democratic debate.[322]
  • December 19: The sixth Democratic debate will take place in Los Angeles, California, at Loyola Marymount University.[323]

Primary and caucus calendar

Democratic primary and caucus calendar by currently scheduled date
  February
  March 3 (Super Tuesday)
  March 10
  March 14-17
  March 24-29
  April 4-7
  April 28
  May
  June
  No scheduled 2020 date

The following primary and caucus dates have been scheduled by state statutes or state party decisions, but are subject to change pending legislation, state party delegate selection plans, or the decisions of state secretaries of state:[324]

The 57 states, districts, territories, or other constituencies with elections of pledged delegates to decide the Democratic presidential nominee, currently plan to hold the first major determining step for these elections via 50 primaries[m] and seven caucuses (Iowa, Nevada, Wyoming, and four territories).[324] The number of states holding caucuses decreased from 14 in the 2016 nomination process to only three in 2020.[330][331]

Ballot access

Filing for the primaries began in October of 2019.[332][333]Yes means the candidate is on the ballot for the upcoming primary contest, and No means a candidate is not on the ballot. States that have not yet announced who is on the ballot are blank.

Primaries and Caucuses
State/
Territory
Date
IA[i] February 3
NH February 11 Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes [65]
NV[i] February 22 Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes [334]
SC February 29
AL March 3 Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No [335]
AR March 3 Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes [336]
AS[i] March 3
CA March 3
CO March 3 Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes [337]
DA March 3
ME March 3
MA March 3
MN March 3
NC March 3
OK March 3
TN March 3
TX March 3 Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes [338]
UT March 3
VT March 3 Yes Yes Yes Yes [339]
VA March 3
ID March 10
MI March 10 Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes [340]
MS March 10
MO March 10
ND March 10
WA March 10
MP[i] March 14
AZ March 17 Yes Yes [341]
  1. ^ a b c d Caucus

National convention

The 2020 Democratic National Convention is scheduled to take place in Milwaukee, Wisconsin on July 13-16, 2020.[342][343][344]

In addition to Milwaukee, the DNC also considered bids from three other cities: Houston, Texas;[345]Miami Beach, Florida;[346] and Denver, Colorado. Denver, though, was immediately withdrawn from consideration by representatives for the city, who cited scheduling conflicts.[347]

Endorsements

Campaign finance

This is an overview of the money being raised and spent by each campaign for the entire period running from January 1, 2017 to September 30, 2019, as it was reported to the Federal Election Commission (FEC). Total raised are the sum of all individual contributions (large and small), loans from the candidate, and transfers from other campaign committees. The last column, Cash On Hand (COH), has been calculated by subtracting the "spent" amount from the "raised" amount, thereby showing the remaining cash each campaign had available for its future spending as of September 30, 2019. In total the candidates have raised $476,284,606.

  Withdrawn candidate
Campaign committee (January 1, 2017 to September 30, 2019)
Candidate Total raised Individual contributions Debt Spent COH
Total Pct
Michael Bennet[348] $5,622,066 $4,910,561 $1,675,483 34.12% $0 $3,758,466 $1,863,600
Joe Biden[349] $37,785,261 $37,634,586 $13,205,976 35.09% $0 $28,797,633 $8,987,628
Cory Booker[350] $18,494,485 $15,513,702 $4,315,912 27.82% $704,999 $14,270,696 $4,223,789
Steve Bullock[351] $4,372,420 $4,359,670 $1,420,816 32.59% $0 $3,006,276 $1,366,144
Pete Buttigieg[352] $51,549,046 $51,462,291 $24,434,296 47.48% $0 $28,170,528 $23,378,518
Julian Castro[353] $7,625,531 $7,596,670 $4,991,012 65.70% $0 $6,593,158 $672,333
John Delaney[354] $27,198,228 $2,428,051 $312,490 12.87% $10,593,250 $26,672,210 $548,061
Tulsi Gabbard[355] $9,095,133 $6,543,517 $4,215,988 64.43% $0 $6,596,642 $2,138,491
Kamala Harris[356] $36,940,238 $35,505,962 $14,227,239 40.07% $991,069 $26,397,546 $10,542,692
Amy Klobuchar[357] $17,516,388 $13,908,190 $5,536,850 39.81% $0 $13,836,795 $3,679,592
Deval Patrick no data
Bernie Sanders[358] $74,373,436 $61,456,335 $42,798,192 69.64% $0 $40,639,360 $33,734,560
Joe Sestak[359] $374,196 $366,293 $84,687 23.12% $0 $169,634 $204,561
Tom Steyer[360] $49,645,132 $2,047,433 $1,482,546 72.41% $0 $47,021,989 $2,623,142
Elizabeth Warren[361] $60,339,647 $49,788,337 $31,964,112 64.20% $0 $34,622,273 $25,717,674
Marianne Williamson[362] $6,125,025 $6,120,438 $3,832,618 62.62% $48,921 $5,401,293 $723,732
Andrew Yang[363] $15,207,803 $15,140,993 $10,030,908 66.25% $0 $8,840,508 $6,357,361
Bill de Blasio[364] $1,417,610 $1,417,571 $141,899 10.01% $0 $1,374,237 $43,374
Kirsten Gillibrand[365] $15,919,261 $6,278,791 $1,979,075 31.52% $0 $14,364,212 $1,555,049
Mike Gravel[366] $330,059 $330,059 $322,072 97.58% $0 $229,180 $100,879
John Hickenlooper[367] $3,508,448 $3,385,459 $563,002 16.63% $75,000 $3,500,980 $7,468
Jay Inslee[368] $6,922,717 $6,911,292 $3,455,646 50.00% $0 $6,631,300 $291,417
Wayne Messam[369] $126,918 $124,318 $85,481 68.76% $81,876 $104,273 $22,645
Seth Moulton[370] $2,246,778 $1,497,325 $342,438 22.87% $182,328 $2,187,344 $59,433
Beto O'Rourke[371] $18,184,975 $17,483,014 $9,080,677 51.94% $10,825 $15,122,336 $3,347,455
Richard Ojeda[372] $119,478 $77,476 $48,740 62.91% $44,373 $117,476 $2,002
Tim Ryan[373] $1,315,130 $1,261,140 $425,761 33.76% $28,225 $1,156,781 $158,349
Eric Swalwell[374] $2,602,439 $892,373 $340,351 38.14% $10,398 $2,593,289 $9,150

See also

Notes

  1. ^ a b The overall number of pledged delegates is subject to change as possible penalty/bonus delegates (awarded for each state's scheduled election date and potential regional clustering) are not yet included.[1]
  2. ^ a b The number of extra unpledged delegates (superdelegates), who after the first ballot at a contested convention participates in any subsequently needed nominating ballots (together with the 3,769 pledged delegates), was expected to be 765 as of August 2019, but the exact number of superdelegates is still subject to change due to possible deaths, resignations, accessions, or potential election as a pledged delegete.[1]
  3. ^ Prior to the electoral reforms that took effect starting with the 1972 presidential elections, the Democrats used elite-run state conventions to choose convention delegates in two-thirds of the states, and candidates for the presidential nominee could be elected at the national convention of the party without needing to participate in any prior statewide election events.[13] Twenty-nine Democratic candidates announced their presidential candidacies prior to the 1924 Democratic National Convention,[14] and a record of 58 candidates received delegate votes during the 103 nominating ballots at that 17-day-long convention. In the post-reform era, over three-quarters of the states used primary elections to choose delegates, and over 80% of convention delegates were selected in those primaries.[13] For more information, see McGovern-Fraser Commission.
  4. ^ a b c d This individual is not a member of the Democratic Party, but has been the subject of speculation or expressed interest in running under this party.
  5. ^ Bloomberg is included in 270 to Win, Real Clear Politics, and the Average, even though he is not running as of yet.
  6. ^ Calculated by taking the difference of 100% and all other candidates combined
  7. ^ 270 to Win reports the date each poll was released, not the dates each poll was administered.
  8. ^ Bloomberg with 2.0%; Booker and Gabbard with 1.6%; Steyer with 1.2%; Bennet, Bullock, Castro, and Williamson with 0.4%; Sestak with 0.3%; Delaney with 0.2%; Patrick with 0.0%
  9. ^ Bloomberg with 2.3%; Gabbard with 2.0%; Booker with 1.3%; Steyer with 1.3%; Castro with 1.0%; Bennet and Delaney with 0.8%; Bullock with 0.5%; Williamson with 0.3%
  10. ^ The Economist aggregates polls with a trendline regression of polls rather than a strict average of recent polls.
  11. ^ Booker with 2.0%; Gabbard with 1.5%; Steyer with 1.4%; Castro with 0.6%; Bennet with 0.4%; Delaney and Bullock with 0.3%; Williamson with 0.2%; Sestak with 0.0%; Patrick not available
  12. ^ Gabbard with 1.7%; Booker with 1.6%; Bloomberg with 1.4%; Steyer with 1.3%; Castro with 0.7%; Bennet with 0.5%; Bullock and Delaney with 0.4%; Williamson with 0.3%; Sestak with 0.1%; Patrick with 0.0%
  13. ^ 5 out of 50 primaries are not state-run but party-run. "North Dakota Firehouse caucuses" is the official name of their event, but it's held as a party-run primary and not a caucus in 2020. Democrats Abroad likewise conduct their election as a party-run primary, with their pledged delegates allocated at later conventions solely on basis of the proportional result of their party-run primary. The last three states with party-run primaries are Alaska, Kansas and Hawaii.[329][330]

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