2020 24 Hours of Le Mans
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2020 24 Hours of Le Mans
2020 24 Hours of Le Mans
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Index: Races | Winners
Layout of the Circuit de la Sarthe
Layout of the Circuit de la Sarthe

The 88th 24 Hours of Le Mans (French: 88e 24 Heures du Mans) was an automobile endurance race for Le Mans Prototype and Le Mans Grand Touring Endurance cars held from 19 to 20 September 2020 at the Circuit de la Sarthe at Le Mans, France. It was the 88th running of the event, as organised by the automotive group, the Automobile Club de l'Ouest (ACO) since 1923. The race was the seventh in the 2019-20 FIA World Endurance Championship and was held behind closed doors as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic that also forced its postponement from June to September.

A Toyota TS050 Hybrid shared by Mike Conway, Kamui Kobayashi and José María López started from pole position after Kobayashi set the overall fastest lap time in the hyperpole session. The trio led most of the first half of the race until Kobayashi was required to drive their car into the garage with mechanical issues dropping them to fourth in the LMP1 class. Their teammates Sébastien Buemi, Brendon Hartley and Kazuki Nakajima took over the lead which they maintained until the finish. It was Buemi and Nakajima's third Le Mans victory and Hartley's second and Toyota's third in succession. A Rebellion R13 driven by Gustavo Menezes, Norman Nato and Bruno Senna was the highest-placed non-hybrid LMP1 car in second and Conway, Kobayashi and López finished third.

The United Autosports team of Filipe Albuquerque, Philip Hanson and Paul di Resta won the Le Mans Prototype 2 (LMP2) category with Jota Sport's António Félix da Costa, Anthony Davidson and Roberto González following almost 33 seconds later in second place. Panis Racing's Julien Canal, Nico Jamin and Matthieu Vaxivière completed the category podium in third. Aston Martin won the Le Mans Grand Touring Endurance Professional (LMGTE Pro) category with a Aston Martin Racing-run Vantage GTE shared by Alex Lynn, Maxime Martin and Harry Tincknell finishing ahead of AF Corse's James Calado, Alessandro Pier Guidi and Daniel Serra. The British marque also won in the Le Mans Grand Touring Endurance Amateur (LMGTE Am) class with the TF Sport team of Jonathan Adam, Charlie Eastwood and Salih Yoluç beating the Dempsey-Proton Racing squad of Matt Campbell, Riccardo Pera and Christian Ried by 49 seconds.

The result moved Buemi, Hartley and Nakajima to the lead of the LMP Drivers' Championship by seven points over Conway, Kobayashi and López whose third-place finish demoted them to second. Menezes, Nato and Senna remained in third position while Albuquerue and Hanson stayed in fourth having won the LMP2 Endurance Trophy for Drivers as a consequence of their class victory with their co-driver Di Resta fifth. In the GTE Drivers' Championship Lynn and Martin moved to within 15 points of their teammates Marco Sørensen and Nicki Thiim. Toyota and Aston Martin left Le Mans as the respective LMP1 Teams' and GTE Manufacturers' champions with one race left in the season.

Background and event

The 24 Hours of Le Mans was proposed in 1922 by the automotive journalist Charles Faroux to Georges Durand, the president of the automotive group, the Automobile Club de l'Ouest (ACO) and the industrialist Emile Coquilem to test car reliability and fuel-efficiency.[1][2] Alongside the Indianapolis 500 and the Monaco Grand Prix, the race is part of the Triple Crown of Motorsport.[3]

After winning the preceding 6 Hours of Spa-Francorchamps, Toyota's Mike Conway, Kamui Kobayashi and José María López led the LMP Drivers' Championship with 137 points from their teammates Sébastien Buemi, Brendon Hartley and Kazuki Nakajima in second. Rebellion's Gustavo Menezes, Norman Nato and Bruno Senna were third with 109 points, with Filipe Albuquerque and Philip Hanson of United Autosports fourth with 54 points and Paul di Resta in fifth with 46 points.[4] In the GTE Drivers' Championship, Marco Sørensen and Nicki Thiim led for Aston Martin with 127 points over Michael Christensen and Kévin Estre of Porsche in second and AF Corse's James Calado and Alessandro Pier Guidi in third.[4]Toyota led the LMP1 Teams' Championship from Rebellion while Aston Martin was ahead of Porsche in the GTE Manufacturers' Championship.[4]

The 2020 race, the 88th edition of the event, was due to be held at the Circuit de la Sarthe in Le Mans, France, from 13 to 14 June but as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic causing France to impose a national lockdown to slow the spread of the virus was moved to 19 and 20 September by the ACO and the Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile (FIA).[N 1][7][8] The ACO wanted to establish new dates for the race as soon as lockdown was imposed; it did not want to hold it late in the year because of daylight and weather conditions and considered global travel limitations.[9] It was also made the seventh and penultimate round of the 2019-20 FIA World Endurance Championship instead of ending the season as originally planned.[10] Pierre Fillon, the ACO president, said that the race was not cancelled since many teams built their economic models around it.[11]

Although there were plans to admit a limited number of ticket holders to Le Mans in ten social bubbles dubbed "fan villages" of 5,000 people each, it was held behind closed doors following discussions with the local Sarthe Prefecture as a result of an increase of COVID-19 cases in France in the preceding month.[12] All teams were mandated to remain in bubbles and not communicate with other squads.[9] The paddock was limited to a maximum of 5,000 individuals,[11] and everyone admitted to the circuit had to test negative and wear a face mask for safety reasons.[9]

Circuit changes

Modifications were made to the circuit at the exit of Mulsanne Corner. The gravel traps at the corner were extended with the safety fencing updated to enable the moving of the fence line back variously at different points at the turn.[13] A thick layer of larger, wider asphalt was laid at both sides of the turn at the FIA's request to decrease the amount of disruption caused by a car going off.[14] Work began in March 2020 and ended three months later in June.[13][14]

Entries

The ACO received 75 applications by the deadline for entries on 18 December 2019. It granted 62 invitations to the 24 Hours of Le Mans and entries were divided between the Le Mans Prototype 1 (LMP1), Le Mans Prototype 2 (LMP2), Le Mans Grand Touring Endurance Professional (LMGTE Pro) and Le Mans Grand Touring Endurance Amateur (LMGTE Am) categories.[15][16]

Automatic entries

Automatic entry invitations were earned by teams that won their class in the 2019 24 Hours of Le Mans, or won championships in the European Le Mans Series (ELMS), Asian Le Mans Series (ALMS), and the Michelin Le Mans Cup. The second-place finishers in the European Le Mans Series in LMP2 and LMGTE championships also earned an automatic invitation each. Two participants from the WeatherTech SportsCar Championship (WTSC) were chosen by the series to be automatic entries by the ACO regardless of their performance or category. As invitations were granted to teams, they were allowed to change their cars from the previous year to the next, but not allowed to change their category. The LMGTE class invitations from the ELMS and ALMS were allowed to choose between the Pro and Am categories. ELMS' LMP3 (Le Mans Prototype 3) champion is required to field an entry in LMP2 while the ALMS LMP3 champion were permitted to choose between LMP2 or LMGTE Am. The Michelin Le Mans Cup Group GT3 (GT3) champion was invited to the LMGTE Am category.[16]

On 25 February 2020, the ACO announced the final list of automatic entries.[17]

Reason invited[16][17] LMP1 LMP2 LMGTE Pro LMGTE Am
1st in the 24 Hours of Le Mans Japan Toyota Gazoo Racing France Signatech Alpine Matmut Italy AF Corse Germany Team Project 1
1st in the European Le Mans Series (LMP2 and LMGTE) France IDEC Sport United States Luzich Racing
2nd in the European Le Mans Series (LMP2 and LMGTE) Russia G-Drive Racing Germany Dempsey-Proton Racing
1st in the European Le Mans Series (LMP3) United States EuroInternational
WeatherTech SportsCar Championship at-large entries Canada Cameron Cassels United States Richard Heistand
1st in the Asian Le Mans Series (LMP2 and GT) Russia G-Drive Racing with Algarve Taiwan HubAuto Corsa
1st in the Asian Le Mans Series (LMP2 Am) United States Rick Ware Racing
1st in the Asian Le Mans Series (LMP3) United Kingdom Nielsen Racing - or - United Kingdom Nielsen Racing
1st in the Michelin Le Mans Cup (GT3) Switzerland Kessel Racing

Entry list and reserves

The ACO announced the full 62 car entry list, plus ten reserves on 28 February. In addition to the 30 guaranteed entries from the WEC, 18 came from the ELMS, seven from the WTSC, five from the ALMS and two one-off Le Mans entries. The field was split evenly with 31 cars in each of the combined LMP and LMGTE categories.[16] The Richard Mille Racing Team entered the first all-women team in LMP2 at Le Mans and they were joined by a second all-female Iron Lynx squad in LMGTE Am, meaning that for the first since 1977 there were two all-female line-ups in the race.[18]

Garage 56

The ACO intended to continue the Garage 56 concept, started in 2012. Garage 56 allows a 56th entry to test new technologies at the race. Association SRT 41 founded by quadruple amputee racing driver Frédéric Sausset entered into an operational agreement with Graff Racing for one Oreca 07-Gibson car converted into a adapted automobile.[19] The team was due to field three physically impaired drivers in the first all-disabled line-up in Le Mans history but the team withdrew from the event in April 2020 due to the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic leaving it without adequate preparation. Sausset filed an entry request to the ACO for the 2021 24 Hours of Le Mans.[20]

Reserves

In addition to the 62 entries given invitations for the race, 10 were put on a reserve list to replace any withdrawn or ungranted invitations. Reserve entries were ordered with the first replacing the first withdrawal from the race, regardless of the class and entry.[16] Due to the COVID-19 pandemic's economic impact, Porsche withdrew both of their CORE Autosport-ran 911-RSR 19s in May, lowering their representation in LMGTE Pro from four to two entries.[21] That same month, Corvette Racing withdrew their two C8.Rs, meaning the team would be absent at Le Mans for the first time since 2000.[22] On 18 June, the ACO released a revised entry list confirming the withdrawal of the Porsche and Corvette entries. The Spirit of Race Ferrari 488 GTE Evo, the ByKolles CLM P1/01-Gibson, the IDEC Sport and High Class Racing Orecas as well as the Proton Competition Porsche 911 RSR were promoted to the race entry.[23]

Team LNT withdrew one of its Ginetta G60-LT-P1 cars, reducing the LMP1 class to six entries. Performance Tech Motorsports pulled its Oreca 07 from the entry list as the Rick Ware Racing withdrew its Riley Mk. 30 car and the GEAR Racing withdrew its LMGTE Pro-class Ferrari 488 GTE Evo. High Class Racing reduced its involvement to a single LMP2 vehicle. The DragonSpeed, Iron Lynx and Team Project 1 teams all had one car added to the entry list while the D'Station Racing Aston Martin Vantage GTE and the Inter Europol Competition Ligier car were deleted from the reserve list.[24] In August, WeatherTech Racing moved its Ferrari 488 GTE Evo from the LMGTE Am to the LMGTE Pro category following a driver lineup change.[25]Carlin's Dallara P217 and Kessel Racing's LMGTE Am Ferrari were withdrawn later that month as Iron Lynx added a third Ferrari to the LMGTE Am class.[26] On 11 September, the remaining Team LNT Ginetta G60-LT-P1 entry was withdrawn due to uncertainties related to UK COVID-19 quarantine measures and its effect on Ginetta's business model, reducing the entry list to 59 cars.[27]

Testing

For the first time since the 2010 race, the ACO did not hold the official test day for teams to test car aerodynamic updates at Le Mans.[28] The ACO cancelled the test day due to changes to the international motor racing calendar compressing schedules and it did not want to put excessive strain on participants by holding too many events close to each other had the test day been held.[29] Thus, drivers who did not enter the event within the preceding half a decade were required to do at least ten laps during the first two practice sessions and attend an simulator test.[6]

Pre-race balance of performance changes

The FIA Endurance Committee imposed a equivalence of technology in LMP1 and LMP2 and a balance of performance in an attempt to create parity in LMGTE Pro and LMGTE Am. A total of 7 kg (15 lb) of ballast was added to the Toyota TS050 Hybrid compared to 2019 to reduce its handling while non-hybrid and turbocharged LMP1 privateers had no change in weight. Privateers were allowed to use 11 laps worth of fuel per stint to fall in line with Toyota and larger refuelling restrictor diameters for quicker refuelling by a second.[30] In LMGTE Pro, the Aston Martin Vantage GTE received an increased turbocharger boost from 2019 and 1 l (0.22 imp gal; 0.26 US gal) more fuel capacity for better performance. The Porsche 911 RSR-19 was given a 20 kg (44 lb) increase in ballast and a 0.3 mm (0.012 in) larger air restrictor from its predcessor. The LMGTE Am Aston Martin, Ferrari and Porsches had an increase of 10 kg (22 lb) in weight for tighter handling.[31]

Practice

The first three-hour practice session occurred in the morning of 17 September.[32] Nakajima set the fastest lap of 3 minutes, 21.656 seconds in the No. 8 Toyota, ahead of the second-placed No. 7 of Kobayashi. The highest-placed privateer was Menezes' No. 1 Rebellion R13 car in third with teammate Louis Delétraz's No. 3 car fourth. Orecas took the first five places in LMP2 with the quickest lap being a 3 minutes, 29.873 seconds set by Kenta Yamashita of High Class Racing, 0.045 seconds faster than Giedo van der Garde of Racing Team Nederland with Jota Sport's António Félix da Costa third. Aston Martin led both the LMGTE categories with Alex Lynn and Thiim in the No. 97 and No. 95 entries heading the Pro class with Ross Gunn the fastest Amateur class driver in the No. 98 car. Steve Brooks in the No. 89 Project 1 Porsche caused a stoppage with 70 minutes left after getting beached in the gravel trap at the entry to Indianapolis corner and required extraction to enable his return to the pit lane.[33]

A smiling man in his late 20s wearing black rectangular sunglasses and white, blue and red racing overalls. He is holding a ballpoint pen in his right hand and there are a crowd of people behind him up against blue adveristing metal fences.
Patrick Pilet replaced Dwight Merriman after the latter was injured in an accident during practice

The second three-hour practice session was held later in the day.[32] The No. 8 Toyota once again led the session as Buemi set a 3 minutes, 19.719 seconds lap just before the start of the second hour. His teammate Conway in the No. 7 Toyota was almost nine-tenths of a second slower in second. Rebellion were third and fourth after laps from Menezes and Romain Dumas. Nyck de Vries of Racing Team Nederland set the fastest LMP2 lap of 3 minutes, 27.185 seconds lap in the final hour. The No. 37 Jackie Chan DC Racing Oreca car of Will Stevens was second-fastest with Félix da Costa third. Aston Martin was overtaken at the top of LMGTE Pro by Christensen's No. 92 Porsche in the last 20 minutes as Lynn's No. 97 Aston Martin took second. Matt Campbell's No. 77 Dempsey-Proton Racing Porsche topped LMGTE Am in the final ten minutes, ahead of Côme Ledogar in Luzich Racing's No. 61 Ferrari. The session saw two stoppages for crashes. Paul Lafargue crashed his IDEC Sport car exiting the second Mulsanne Straight chicane before the first hour was over. Lafargue's teammate Dwight Merriman in the No. 17 car had a heavy accident exiting the Porsche Curves an hour later.[34] Merriman sustained a back injury and the FIA Medical Delegate deemed him unfit to drive, leading Porsche's Patrick Pilet to replace him.[35][36]

The third session lasted for four hours and occurred at night,[37] providing drivers the opportunity to acclimatise to the dark for the first time prior to the race.[5] Deletraz's No. 3 Rebellion led from the first hour to the end with a 3 minutes, 19.158 seconds lap. Kobayashi's No. 7 Toyota followed in second with Menezes' No. 1 Rebellion third. The No. 8 Toyota was fourth after a lap from Buemi.[37] After 90 minutes, Bruno Spengler caused a stoppage when he ran wide exiting Tetre Rouge corner and crashed the ByKolles car. Spengler drove the car to the pit lane for repairs.[38]Tristan Gommendy's No. 30 Duqueine Engineering car led in LMP2 with a lap of 3 minutes, 28.013 seconds. Job van Uitert was second in United Autosport's No. 32 car and Jean-Éric Vergne's No. 26 G-Drive Racing vehicle was third. LMGTE Pro was led by Estre's No. 92 Porsche from Aston Martin's No. 97 and No. 95 entries of Maxime Martin and Sørensen. Kei Cozzolino put the MR Racing Ferrari top in LMGTE Am with Augusto Farfus's No. 98 Aston Martin and Paolo Ruberti's No. 60 Iron Linx Ferrari second and third.[37] The session ended early when Bonamy Grimes lost control of the No. 62 Red River Sport Ferrari under braking for the first Mulsanne Straight chicane and struck the outside barrier. Grimes was unhurt.[38]

The fourth and final practice lasted an hour on the morning of 18 September.[32] Menezes set a lap of 3 minutes, 21.132 seconds just before the final 15 minutes to lead the field in the No. 1 Rebellion ahead of the second-placed No. 7 Toyota of Conway and Deletraz's No. 3 Rebellion in third. The slower Toyota was Hartley's No. 8 car in fourth. The quickest LMP2 car was Di Resta's No. 23 United Autosports entry with a 3 minutes, 27.185 seconds lap time. Vergne in G-Drive's No. 26 car was second with Félix da Costa's No. 38 Jota entry in third. Porsche set the pace in LMGTE Pro with Christensen's in the No. 92 car fastest over the No. 51 AF Corse car of Sam Bird and his teammate Pier Guidi. Team Project 1's Matteo Cairoli was the fastest entrant in LMGTE Am.[39][40] Red River Sport sat out the session as its Ferrari was being repairs following Grimes' accident while both IDEC Sport cars were driven for the first time since their accidents the day before.[40]

Qualifying

A new qualifying format for the Le Mans event was introduced, consisting on only two single qualifying sessions (instead of the three qualifying sessions in the previous editions). The 45-minute Thursday late afternoon qualifying session determined the field, except for the top six cars in each category. The top six cars in each class took part in a half hour shootout on Friday morning, known as "Le Mans Hyperpole". The shootout determined the pole position in each category.[41] Cars were placed on the starting grid in order by category, with all LMP1s at the front of the field regardless of lap time, followed by LMP2, LMGTE Pro, and LMGTE Am. The cars were placed in following order: the six qualifying hyperpole vehicles by best hyperpole session lap time, followed by the rest of the cars in the class that did not qualify for hyperpole by best lap time set during the first qualifying session.[32]

A portrait of a man in his mid-20s wearing a white T-shirt and baseball cap with the logo of the Sauber Formula One team looking to the right of the camera.
Kamui Kobayashi set the fastest lap of the hyperpole session to take pole position in the No. 7 Toyota TS050 Hybrid.

All five entries in the LMP1 class progressed to the hyperpole portion of qualifying with the fastest lap being a 3 minutes, 17.089 seconds time from Kobayashi in the No. 7 Toyota early in the session.[42] The No. 95 and No. 97 Aston Martin Racing Vantage's of Sørensen and Lynn, along with car No. 51 and No. 71 AF Corse Ferrari's of Davide Rigon and Pier Guidi and the Porsche 911 RSR-19 cars 91 and 92 of Bruni and Christensen progressed to hyperpole in LMGTE Pro. LMGTE Am saw Gunn's No. 98 Aston Martin Vantage and the 90 TF Sport Vantage of Charlie Eastwood along with Gulf Racing's Ben Barker, the No. 61 Luzich Racing Ferrari of Ledogar, Dempsey-Proton Porsche with car 77 driven by Campbell and the Team Project 1 Porsche with car No. 56 used by Cairoli going through to hyperpole. In LMP2 the Racing Team Nederland entry of De Vries along with entries from Stevens of the Jackie Chan team, the No. 22 and 32 United Autosports vehicle of Di Resta and Alex Brundle, Vergne's G-Drive No. 26 car and Yamashita's High Class Racing No. 39 car all qualified for the hyperpole session.[43][44]

Traffic was less of an issue with fewer cars in hyperpole,[45] allowing for faster lap times.[46] Kobayashi set the fastest lap of 3 minutes, 15.267 seconds for pole position in the No. 7 Toyota on his second lap on a new set of tyres.[46] Nakajima qualified the No. 8 Toyota in second, Menezes' No. 1 Rebellion took third in the quickest non-hybrid car, Deletraz's No. 3 Rebellion was fourth and the Tom Dillmann put the ByKolles team fifth.[45] Kobayashi achieved Toyota's fourth pole position in a row at Le Mans.[47] LMP2 pole position was secured Di Resta's No. 22 United Autosport entry on a new class lap record of 3 minutes, 24.528 seconds. Following in second through sixth were the No. 26 G-Drive (Vergne), the Racing Team Nederland (De Vries), High Class (Yamashita), the No. 32 United Autosport (Brundle) and No. 37 Jackie Chan (Stevens) entries. Each of the three GTE manufacturers occupied the first three positions in LMGTE Pro. Bruni took the category pole position driving the No. 91 Porsche from Calado's AF Corse No. 51 Ferrari and Sørensen's No. 95 Aston Martin.[45][48] In LMGTE Am Ledogar's No. 61 Luzich Ferrari reset the category lap record to a 3 minutes, 51.266 seconds to claim pole position, demoting Campbell in the No. 77 Proton Porsche to second. Third was Cairoli driving the No. 56 Project 1 Porsche.[46]

After qualifying the FIA revised the balance of performance to increase the fuel capacity of the LMGTE Pro-category Porsche 911 RSR-19 by 1 l (0.22 imp gal; 0.26 US gal) and clarified that LMGTE Pro cars found to be in non-compliance of refuelling procedures would entail penalties on an incremental scale from a stop-and-go penalty to a two-minute hold.[49]

Qualifying results

Pos.[50] Class No. Team Grid
1 LMP1 7 Toyota Gazoo Racing 3:17.089 3:15.267 1
2 LMP1 1 Rebellion Racing 3:21.598 3:15.822 2
3 LMP1 8 Toyota Gazoo Racing 3:17.336 3:16.649 3
4 LMP1 3 Rebellion Racing 3:24.632 3:18.330 4
5 LMP1 4 ByKolles Racing Team 3:24.468 3:23.043 5
6 LMP2 22 United Autosports 3:27.148 3:24.528 6
7 LMP2 26 G-Drive Racing 3:27.366 3:24.860 7
8 LMP2 29 Racing Team Nederland 3:26.648 3:25.062 8
9 LMP2 33 High Class Racing 3:27.611 3:25.426 9
10 LMP2 32 United Autosports 3:27.598 3:25.671 10
11 LMP2 37 Jackie Chan DC Racing 3:27.097 3:25.785 11
12 LMP2 38 Jota 3:27.728 12
13 LMP2 16 G-Drive Racing by Algarve 3:27.767 13
14 LMP2 31 Panis Racing 3:27.791 14
15 LMP2 36 Signatech Alpine Elf 3:27.794 15
16 LMP2 27 DragonSpeed USA 3:27.913 16
17 LMP2 42 Cool Racing 3:28.509 17
18 LMP2 39 SO24-Has by Graff 3:28.574 18
19 LMP2 30 Duqueine Team 3:29.091 19
20 LMP2 25 Algarve Pro Racing 3:29.402 20
21 LMP2 21 DragonSpeed USA 3:29.741 21
22 LMP2 47 Cetilar Racing 3:29.880 22
23 LMP2 35 Eurasia Motorsport 3:30.497 23
24 LMP2 24 Nielsen Racing 3:30.897 24
25 LMP2 50 Richard Mille Racing Team 3:31.020 25
26 LMP2 34 Inter Europol Competition 3:31.393 26
27 LMP2 11 EuroInternational 3:33.747 27
28 LMGTE Pro 91 Porsche GT Team 3:52.036 3:50.874 28
29 LMGTE Pro 51 AF Corse 3:51.244 3:51.115 29
30 LMGTE Pro 95 Aston Martin Racing 3:50.872 3:51.241 30
31 LMGTE Pro 97 Aston Martin Racing 3:50.925 3:51.324 31
32 LMGTE Pro 71 AF Corse 3:51.988 3:51.515 32
33 LMGTE Pro 92 Porsche GT Team 3:52.142 3:51.770 33
34 LMGTE Pro 63 WeatherTech Racing 3:52.508 34
35 LMGTE Am 61 Luzich Racing 3:53.292 3:51.266 36
36 LMGTE Am 77 Dempsey-Proton Racing 3:53.334 3:51.322 37
37 LMGTE Am 56 Team Project 1 3:53.598 3:51.647 38
38 LMGTE Am 98 Aston Martin Racing 3:52.778 3:52.105 39
39 LMGTE Am 90 TF Sport 3:52.961 3:52.299 40
40 LMGTE Am 86 Gulf Racing 3:52.970 3:52.346 41
41 LMGTE Am 83 AF Corse 3:53.621 42
42 LMGTE Am 99 Dempsey-Proton Racing 3:53.670 43
43 LMGTE Am 57 Team Project 1 3:53.838 44
44 LMGTE Am 54 AF Corse 3:54.144 45
45 LMGTE Am 88 Dempsey-Proton Racing 3:54.281 46
46 LMGTE Am 70 MR Racing 3:54.628 47
47 LMGTE Am 72 Hub Auto Racing 3:55.308 48
48 LMGTE Am 55 Spirit of Race 3:55.772 49
49 LMGTE Am 75 Iron Lynx 3:56.141 50
50 LMGTE Am 66 JMW Motorsport 3:56.383 51
51 LMGTE Am 78 Proton Competition 3:56.475 52
52 LMGTE Am 85 Iron Lynx 3:56.833 53
53 LMGTE Am 60 Iron Lynx 3:57.876 54
54 LMGTE Am 62 Red River Sport 4:00.084 55
55 LMGTE Am 89 Team Project 1 4:00.691 56
- LMGTE Pro 82 Risi Competizione No Time[Q 1] 35
- LMGTE Am 52 AF Corse No Time[Q 1] 57
- LMP2 17 IDEC Sport No Time PL[Q 2]
- LMP2 28 IDEC Sport No Time PL[Q 2]
  1. ^ a b The No. 82 Risi Ferrari and No. 52 AF Corse Ferrari had all their qualifying lap times deleted after both teams broke parc fermé regulations by lifting the car.[51][52]
  2. ^ a b The No. 17 and No. 28 IDEC Oreca-Gibson were required to start from pit lane after the conclusion of the first racing lap for failing to participate in qualifying.[53]

Warm-up

A 15-minute warm-up session was held on the morning of 19 September.[32] Rain fell early in the morning,[54] meaning a majority of teams were reluctant to send their cars onto the circuit.[55] Buemi's No. 8 Toyota recorded the fastest lap at 3 minutes, 36.693 seconds with his teammate Conway in the No. 7 car second.[55] Both the Rebellion and the one ByKolles non-hybrid cars set no lap times during the session. Van Der Garde led LMP2 in the Racing Team Nederland car at 3 minutes, 43.022 seconds. Matthieu Vaxivière was six seconds slower in the second-placed Panis Racing car.[54] Calado's No. 51 AF Corse Ferrari was fastest in LMGTE Pro with Giancarlo Fisichella's No. 54 AF Corse car quickest in LMGTE Am and third amongst all LMGTE entries.[55] No major incidents occurred during the session.[54]

Race

Start and opening hours

A plethora of cars turning left into a corner at the Circuit de la Sarthe
The start of the race as viewed at the Dunlop Chicane

The track at the start was wet with the air temperature from 16.5 to 24.7 °C (61.7 to 76.5 °F) and the track temperature between 19 and 40 °C (66 and 104 °F).[56] The French tricolour was waved at 14:30 Central European Summer Time (UTC+02:00) by Carlos Tavares, the chair of Groupe PSA's managing board, to start the race,[57] led by the starting pole sitter Conway.[53] Because the event was held in September, track temperatures would be cooler and there would be more darkness hours,[6] influencing changes in vehicle behaviour and requiring drivers and teams to adapt to the new conditions.[5] At the start, Senna overtook Buemi and briefly passed Conway through turn one but the latter retained the lead through later braking into Dunlop turn. Senna refocused on holding second place from Buemi as Bruni fell to fourth in LMGTE Pro when Calado, and Aston Martin's Lynn and Thiim overtook him. Buemi passed Senna on lap nine due to a shorter first pit stop as a result of Toyota overfilling their cars with fuel. He relinquished second to Senna when he was required to make an extra pit stop to replace a left-rear puncture five laps later, putting Conway 40 seconds ahead of Buemi and promoting Berthon to third.[58][59][60]

On 20 minutes,[61]Oswaldo Negri Jr. lost control of the No. 61 Luzich car under braking in the entry to Dunlop corner, causing Thomas Preining driving the No. 88 Dempsey-Proton Porsche to swerve to avoid the spinning Ferrari, drive onto the grass and hit the outside tyre barrier backwards into the turn.[58][59][60] The damage to the Dempsey-Proton Porsche necessitated its removal from the side of the track to behind the barrier before Preining was able to drive it to the pit lane.[62] At the conclusion of the opening hour, both Toyotas were faster than the Rebellion cars per lap although Senna had set the overall fastest lap on lap four.[61] The LMGTE Pro lead became a multi-car battle between representatives of Aston Martin and Ferrari, with the lead changing several times over the following hours.[61][63] Berthon brought the No. 3 Rebellion car into the pit lane for a engine bodywork switch,[64] as the divergence between both Toyotas created by the No. 8 car's earlier puncture allowed both to race each other for the overall lead in the second hour when Conway was overtaken by teammate Buemi into the opening section of the Porsche Curves but the former retook it when the latter made a scheduled pit stop.[65]

James Allen's No. 39 Graff car took the lead in LMP2 during the second hour, which the team held until Allen's co-driver Vincent Capillaire lost control of the vehicle in the Porsche Curves and went into the gravel trap 3 hours and 30 minutes in,[65][66] falling to eighth in class and forcing Capillaire to make an additional pit stop.[61][66] Stevens moved through the LMP2 field to take the lead in the No. 37 Jackie Chan car following Capillaire's pit stop. Pit stops for Ho-Pin Tung's No. 37 Jackie Chan entry and Roman Rusinov's No. 26 G-Drive car elevated the No. 32 United Autosports car of Job van Uitert to the lead in LMP2.[66] The lead of LMGTE Am became a battle between representatives of the Team Project 1, TF Sport, AF Corse and Aston Martin Racing with first place being exchanged multiple times with Emmanuel Collard's No. 83 Ferrari moving to the top of the category at the conclusion of the fourth hour by making a pit stop during a slow zone procedure.[63][66] The No. 56 Project 1 Porsche fell to seventh in LMGTE Am early in the fifth hour when the team incurred a one-minute stop-and-go penalty for speeding in a slow zone.[67]

Sunset to night

As dusk fell,[61] Alexander West lost control of the No. 52 AF Corse Ferrari driving through the Porsche Curves and crashed into the outside barrier with the left-hand side of the vehicle and was facing the opposite direction.[68][69] The accident led to the first safety car intervention of the event so that the barriers at the Porsche Curves could be repaired.[61][70] During the safety car period, Toyota brought Kobayashi's No. 7 entry into the pit lane for fuel, promoting Nakajima's No. 8 car to the lead.[69][68] As the safety cars were recalled, the first two in LMP1 and LMP2, the top three in LMGTE Pro and the top two in LMGTE Am were closed up by a few seconds and separated from the rest of their respective fields.[61]Gabriel Aubry's No. 37 Jackie Chan Oreca led in LMP2 but around half past eight the squad relinquished the lead it had held for 27 consecutive laps to Vergne's No. 26 G-Drive team when he stopped in the Porsche Curves because of a failed alternator.[63][71][72] The car was disqualified when Aubry was determined to have received outside assistance for repairs by a team member supplying a car component to him on the circuit to enable its return to the pit lane.[73]

Not long after, the rear wing on Spengler's ByKolles car failed in the centre of a corner, sending him into the gravel trap at the Dunlop Curves and striking the tyre wall. Spengler was unhurt and was able to drive the car to the pit lane and into retirement for the sixth year in succession.[61][71][72] Almost at the same time, Gommendy's No. 30 Duqueine vehicle and Albquerque's No. 22 United Autosports car collided into the first Mulsanne Straight chicane, causing the former to lose control of his car and hit the guardrail barrier hard enough to damage it. Gommendy was unhurt and entered the medical car unassisted. Safety cars were required once again as the barriers needed lengthy repairs, while a slow zone was used after 30 minutes.[71][74] During the second safety car intervention, the No. 8 Toyota was brought into the garage to replace the right-front brakes and allow the team to repair a brake duct cooling problem caused by rubber build-up.[71][74] Repairs took over 10 minutes to finish,[74] and the No. 8 Toyota briefly lost second to Nato's No. 1 Rebellion car and dropped one lap behind López's No. 7 vehicle.[71][72]

The track was declared wet in the eighth hour after drivers reported light, localised rainfall in the Porsche Curves.[75]Andrea Piccini relinquished the No. 75 Iron Lynx car's hold of the lead of LMGTE Am to Nicklas Nielsen's No. 83 AF Corse car when it had a power steering problem that required the opening of its front storage compartment in the garage.[61][76] Vergne was required to serve a drive-through penalty the No. 26 G-Drive team incurred for him passing behind the safety car,[77] promoting Brundle's No. 32 United Autosports entry to the lead of LMP2.[75] After 7​ hours a third safety car period was needed for six minutes to allow for the moving of safety vehicles used to repair the guardrail barrier following Gommendy's crash at the first Mulsanne Straight chicane.[71][75] When racing resumed, the main focus was on the battle for the lead in both of the GTE classes between Aston Martin and Ferrari.[61][71] Rusinov's No. 26 G-Drive Oreca bowed out of the lead battle in LMP2 when he entered the pit lane with starter motor problems in the 10th hour after having to restart the car several times on the circuit.[78]

Bird ceded the No. 71 AF Corse Ferrari's hold on third place in LMGTE Pro to Westbrook's No. 95 Aston Martin in the 11th hour when he picked up a right-rear puncture on the Mulsanne Straight and drove slowly to the pit lane where it moved into the garage for an inspection and brake repairs. At mid-point, Kobayashi's No. 7 Toyota led Hartley's sister No. 8 car by a lap with the two Rebellion entries of Menezes and Dumas third and fourth. United Autosports held first and second LMP2 with the No. 32 of Will Owen ahead of his teammate Di Resta and the No. 38 Jota car of Roberto González third.[79] Soon after Kobayashi began slowing due to a loss of power caused by a fracture in the right-hand side exhaust manifold traced to a build quality problem, and relinquished the lead of the race to teammate Hartley when he entered the garage to allow mechanics to install a new right-hand side turbocharger and exhaust assembly.[80][81][82] Repairs lasted 29 minutes and 47 seconds and the No. 7 Toyota returned in fourth position, seven laps behind Hartley and Rebellion's Menezes and Dumas were promoted to second and third.[82]

Early morning to afternoon

Félix da Costa's seat belts were accidentally undone while adjusting them for tightness through Tertre Rouge in a slow zone, requiring him to make an extra pit stop in Jota's No. 38 car and dropping him further behind United Autosports.[83] In the early morning Brundle drove the No. 32 United Autosports car into the garage for ​ of an hour with a broken solid engine oil line causing an oil leak, handing the lead of LMP2 to Di Resta's sister No. 22 vehicle. Not long after Aston Martin's No. 98 of Paul Dalla Lana was forced to leave the battle for the LMGTE Am victory when the car's rear suspension failed into Indianapolis turn and requiring attention in the garage dropping the entry down the class order.[84][85] By the 17th hour, Julien Canal's Panis car was third in LMP2 with Jensen's No. 26 G-Drive entry close behind in fourth as Aston Martin and Ferrari continued to contest the victory in LMGTE Pro as an alternative tyre strategy to refuelling saw exchanges of the class lead between the No. 51 AF Corse and No. 95 Aston Martin teams.[86][87] Senna had an anxious moment in the 19th hour when he reported a vibration on the No. 1 Rebellion due to its front nose becoming dislodged, requiring a five-minute stay in the garage for new front bodywork elongated by a twisted mounting point. Menezes took over from Senna and fell to third behind teammate Dumas.[88][89][90]

The Rebellion team asked their drivers to pressure Hartley in the No. 8 Toyota to the conclusion of the race.[91] Rebellion frequently imposed team orders on Menezes to stop him battling his teammate Dumas and prevent the No. 1 car overheating and sustaining engine damage since a duel would potentially prevent them from achieving a podium finish.[61] Menezes noted it would be difficult to remain within two seconds of Dumas while Kobayashi's No. 7 Toyota was close by. Kobayashi unlapped himself from the Rebellion cars and took pressure off Menezes.[92] Rebellion's strategy to put their cars on different pit stop cycles proved to be ineffective as Menezes continued to duel Dumas.[61] With 2 hours, 20 minutes remaining, Deletraz relieved Dumas in the No. 3 car but had trouble starting due to a worn clutch, losing 20 seconds and losing third to the sister No. 1 entry. Deletraz missed the braking point for Indianapolis turn and damaged the No. 3 Rebellion against the tyre barrier. A pit stop to replace the front and rear bodywork saw Deletraz again fail to start and the No. 3 team lost third to the No. 7 Toyota.[93][94]

With less than 45 minutes remaining, Vergne's No. 26 G-Drive car had a high-speed front-right suspension failure into Indianapolis corner. Vergne stopped before the wall and returned to the garage, losing third in LMP2 to the Panis team. The fourth and final safety car intervention of the race was necessitated when Allen driving the No. 39 Graff car struck the tyre barrier near to the Porsche Curves in the concluding hour and the wall needed repairing. Racing resumed following the completion of repairs to the barrier with 23 minutes remaining.[61][95] Hanson driving the No. 22 United Autosports car made a swift pit stop for fuel in the final ten minutes. He returned to the circuit six seconds ahead of Jota's No. 38 car, which made a final pit stop four minutes after Hanson since driver Davidson could not save enough fuel under safety car conditions.[61][96]

Finish

Nakajima crossed the finish line first after 387 laps to win for the No. 8 Toyota team, five laps ahead of the second-placed No. 1 Rebellion car.[97] The No. 7 Toyota completed the podium in third position and the No. 3 Rebellion was the final car to finish in LMP1 in fourth.[98] It was Buemi and Nakajima's third Le Mans victory and Hartley's second as well as Toyota's third in succession.[99] Toyota also won the LMP1 Teams' Championship since Rebellion were unable to overtake its points total with one race left.[100] The No. 22 United Autosports car led the final 136 laps to win in LMP2 at Le Mans for the first time and drivers Albuquerque, Di Resta and Hanson secured their first Le Mans victories.[63][101] United Autosports as well as Albquerque and Hanson secured the LMP2 teams' and driver's endurance trophies with one round to go.[96] Jota Sport followed 32.831 seconds later in second and Panis Racing completed the class podium in third.[102] Aston Martin took its first LMGTE Pro victory since 2017 with the No. 97 car finishing 1 minute and 33 seconds ahead of the No. 51 AF Corse Ferrari to win the GTE Manufacturers' Championship. The marque also won in LMGTE Am with the No. 98 TF Sport entry earning the team's first category win, with the No. 77 Dempsey-Proton Porsche 49 seconds behind in second.[101][103]

Post-race

A podium ceremony with drivers and delegates
The LMP2 post-race podium ceremony

The top three teams in each of the four classes appeared on the podium to collect their trophies and spoke to the media in separate press conferences.[32] Buemi commented: "It's amazing. We get to keep the big trophy now, when you win three times. That was the main target."[104] Nakajima said he was satisfied that at least one member of his team had won the race while Hartley added that winning with two different manufacturers surprised him.[104] Senna stated that Rebellion's second-place finish was an "amazing achievement" and that he would accept the result. Menezes called his second overall podium finish "special" and that sharing the result was "something special".[89] Conway admitted he was upset to lose the opportunity at victory, saying: "This place hasn't been the kindest to us at times. Three wins on the trot for the team, we've got to be happy about that for the team, but on our side of the garage we just feel like another one got away from us."[105]Pascal Vasselon, Toyota's technical director, said he felt sorry for the No. 7 crew and acknowledged they were the faster than the No. 8 team.[105]

Albquerque received a telephone call from the President of Portugal congratulating him on becoming the first Portuguese driver to win the 24 Hours of Le Mans.[106] He added, "It's my seventh time and I've been here quite a while. I was just waiting for when it's going to be my day. I've been searching for this podium and it's a dream. LMP2 is a great category with many good drivers. With 24 cars it was extremely competitive. We never knew who would be the winner."[107] Hanson said he thought he lost the chance to win, "It was a very hectic last 10 minutes of the race and it made it for me. It's not as exciting if you're coasting home, just looking after the car, to if you're pushing like mad to bring it home in P1. It was a really exciting way to end it."[107] Félix da Costa admitted fault for unbuckling his seatbelts and said he felt his team should have won because he believed they had the most consistent package. Davidson said Jota stopped using a fuel-saving plan when it became apparent United Autosports would not finish the race without making another pit stop but felt an extra lap behind the safety car could have possibly created a different scenario.[83]

Lynn called his victory in LMGTE Pro "the biggest win of his career" and added that the problems with the Aston Martin Vantage's speed in preceding years made it more special, "I'm very proud of what the team has been able to achieve and the vast improvement the car has made in sheer lap time and also in balance and reliability in every sense."[108] Tincknell won on his debut for Aston Martin and said that he learnt greatly over the course of the opening two stints when both Ferraris overtook him and he used this to get ahead of Daniel Serra later on, "It was a game of cat and mouse. We were on new tires and they were on old tires, and vice versa. We were never really sure how it was going to pan out, but we were confident that we had the car, the team and the people to do it."[109] Calado said Ferrari was a little slower than Aston Martin through first to third gears and conceded it was the faster car, adding, "We couldn't have done any more really. We did what we could, and we basically just lacked pace, they were quicker than us. Second is not a great feeling, but we've just got to think ahead and try to improve the car for next year."[110]

Vassleon said a lack of track grip caused by rainfall removing rubber and bringing oily substances to the surface the night before slowed the race and admitted to being worried about Senna's performance during practice and the first stint before expressing surprise when Rebellion slowed. Calim Bouhadra, the CEO of Rebellion, stated slower traffic was the primary differentiator between the hybrid Toyota and Rebellion's non-hybrid cars early on and their only worry was managing the brakes at the event's conclusion.[111] Martin commented that the main reason Aston Martin won both the GTE categories was by not switching the brake discs. LMGTE Am winner Jonathan Adam said it was the first time he had completed a 24-hour race without needing to change brakes.[112]

The result moved Buemi, Hartley and Nakajima to the lead of the LMP Drivers' Championship with 175 points. Their teammates Conway, Kobayashi and López fell to second as Menezes, Nato and Senna maintained third place. Albquerque and Hanson were fourth with their co-driver Di Resta fifth. Lynn and Martin drew to within 15 points of their teammates and GTE Drivers' Championship leaders Sørensen and Thiim. Toyota and Aston Martin left Le Mans as the respective LMP1 Teams' and GTE Manufacturers' champions with one race left in the season.[4]

Race results

The minimum number of laps for classification at the finish (70 per cent of the overall race winner's distance) was 270 laps. Class winners are in bold.[98][113][114]

Pos Class No. Team Drivers Chassis Tyre Laps Time/Reason
Engine
1 LMP1 8 Japan Toyota Gazoo Racing Switzerland Sébastien Buemi
New Zealand Brendon Hartley
Japan Kazuki Nakajima
Toyota TS050 Hybrid M 387 24:01:45.305
Toyota 2.4 L Hybrid Turbo V6
2 LMP1 1 Switzerland Rebellion Racing United States Gustavo Menezes
France Norman Nato
Brazil Bruno Senna
Rebellion R13 M 382 +5 laps
Gibson GL458 4.5 L V8
3 LMP1 7 Japan Toyota Gazoo Racing United Kingdom Mike Conway
Japan Kamui Kobayashi
Argentina José María López
Toyota TS050 Hybrid M 381 +6 laps
Toyota 2.4 L Hybrid Turbo V6
4 LMP1 3 Switzerland Rebellion Racing France Nathanaël Berthon
Switzerland Louis Delétraz
France Romain Dumas
Rebellion R13 M 381 +6 laps
Gibson GL458 4.5 L V8
5 LMP2 22 United Kingdom United Autosports Portugal Filipe Albuquerque
United Kingdom Philip Hanson
United Kingdom Paul di Resta
Oreca 07 M 370 +17 laps
Gibson GK428 4.2 L V8
6 LMP2 38 United Kingdom Jota Portugal António Félix da Costa
United Kingdom Anthony Davidson
Mexico Roberto González
Oreca 07 G 370 +17 laps
Gibson GK428 4.2 L V8
7 LMP2 31 France Panis Racing France Julien Canal
France Nico Jamin
France Matthieu Vaxivière
Oreca 07 G 368 +19 laps
Gibson GK428 4.2 L V8
8 LMP2 36 France Signatech Alpine Elf France Thomas Laurent
Brazil André Negrão
France Pierre Ragues
Alpine A470 M 367 +20 laps
Gibson GK428 4.2 L V8
9 LMP2 26 Russia G-Drive Racing Denmark Mikkel Jensen
Russia Roman Rusinov
France Jean-Éric Vergne
Aurus 01 M 367 +20 laps
Gibson GK428 4.2 L V8
10 LMP2 28 France IDEC Sport United Kingdom Richard Bradley
France Paul-Loup Chatin
France Paul Lafargue
Oreca 07 M 366 +21 laps
Gibson GK428 4.2 L V8
11 LMP2 25 Portugal Algarve Pro Racing United States John Falb
United States Matt McMurry
Switzerland Simon Trummer
Oreca 07 G 365 +22 laps
Gibson GK428 4.2 L V8
12 LMP2 42 Switzerland Cool Racing Switzerland Antonin Borga
Switzerland Alexandre Coigny
France Nicolas Lapierre
Oreca 07 M 365[N 2] +22 laps
Gibson GK428 4.2 L V8
13 LMP2 50 France Richard Mille Racing Team Colombia Tatiana Calderón
Germany Sophia Flörsch
Netherlands Beitske Visser
Oreca 07 M 364 +23 laps
Gibson GK428 4.2 L V8
14 LMP2 47 Italy Cetilar Racing Italy Andrea Belicchi
Italy Roberto Lacorte
Italy Giorgio Sernagiotto
Dallara P217 M 363 +24 laps
Gibson GK428 4.2 L V8
15 LMP2 17 France IDEC Sport United Kingdom Jonathan Kennard
France Patrick Pilet
United Kingdom Kyle Tilley
Oreca 07 M 363 +24 laps
Gibson GK428 4.2 L V8
16 LMP2 27 United States DragonSpeed USA United Kingdom Ben Hanley
Sweden Henrik Hedman
Netherlands Renger van der Zande
Oreca 07 M 361 +26 laps
Gibson GK428 4.2 L V8
17 LMP2 32 United Kingdom United Autosports United Kingdom Alex Brundle
United States Will Owen
Netherlands Job van Uitert
Oreca 07 M 359 +28 laps
Gibson GK428 4.2 L V8
18 LMP2 35 Philippines Eurasia Motorsport Australia Nick Foster
Spain Roberto Merhi
Japan Nobuya Yamanaka
Ligier JS P217 M 351 +36 laps
Gibson GK428 4.2 L V8
19 LMP2 29 Netherlands Racing Team Nederland Netherlands Frits van Eerd
Netherlands Giedo van der Garde
Netherlands Nyck de Vries
Oreca 07 M 349 +38 laps
Gibson GK428 4.2 L V8
20 LMGTE
Pro
97 United Kingdom Aston Martin Racing United Kingdom Alex Lynn
Belgium Maxime Martin
United Kingdom Harry Tincknell
Aston Martin Vantage AMR M 346 +41 laps
Aston Martin 4.5 L Turbo V8
21 LMGTE
Pro
51 Italy AF Corse United Kingdom James Calado
Italy Alessandro Pier Guidi
Brazil Daniel Serra
Ferrari 488 GTE Evo M 346 +41 laps
Ferrari F154CB 3.9 L Turbo V8
22 LMGTE
Pro
95 United Kingdom Aston Martin Racing Denmark Marco Sørensen
Denmark Nicki Thiim
United Kingdom Richard Westbrook
Aston Martin Vantage AMR M 343 +44 laps
Aston Martin 4.5 L Turbo V8
23 LMGTE
Pro
82 United States Risi Competizione France Sébastien Bourdais
France Jules Gounon
France Olivier Pla
Ferrari 488 GTE Evo M 339 +48 laps
Ferrari F154CB 3.9 L Turbo V8
24 LMGTE
Am
90 United Kingdom TF Sport United Kingdom Jonathan Adam
Republic of Ireland Charlie Eastwood
Turkey Salih Yoluç
Aston Martin Vantage AMR M 339 +48 laps
Aston Martin 4.5 L Turbo V8
25 LMGTE
Am
77 Germany Dempsey-Proton Racing Australia Matt Campbell
Italy Riccardo Pera
Germany Christian Ried
Porsche 911 RSR M 339 +48 laps
Porsche 4.0 L Flat-6
26 LMGTE
Am
83 Italy AF Corse France Emmanuel Collard
Denmark Nicklas Nielsen
France François Perrodo
Ferrari 488 GTE Evo M 339 +48 laps
Ferrari F154CB 3.9 L Turbo V8
27 LMGTE
Am
56 Germany Team Project 1 Italy Matteo Carioli
Norway Egidio Perfetti
Netherlands Larry ten Voorde
Porsche 911 RSR M 339 +48 laps
Porsche 4.0 L Flat-6
28 LMP2 24 United Kingdom Nielsen Racing Canada Garett Grist
United Kingdom Alex Kapadia
United Kingdom Anthony Wells
Oreca 07 M 338 +49 laps
Gibson GK428 4.2 L V8
29 LMGTE
Am
86 United Kingdom Gulf Racing United Kingdom Benjamin Barker
United Kingdom Michael Wainwright
United Kingdom Andrew Watson
Porsche 911 RSR M 337 +50 laps
Porsche 4.0 L Flat-6
30 LMGTE
Am
66 United Kingdom JMW Motorsport United States Richard Heistand
Denmark Jan Magnussen
United States Max Root
Ferrari 488 GTE Evo M 335 +52 laps
Ferrari F154CB 3.9 L Turbo V8
31 LMGTE
Pro
91 Germany Porsche GT Team Italy Gianmaria Bruni
Austria Richard Lietz
France Frédéric Makowiecki
Porsche 911 RSR-19 M 335 +52 laps
Porsche 4.2 L Flat-6
32 LMGTE
Am
61 Switzerland Luzich Racing France Côme Ledogar
Brazil Oswaldo Negri Jr.
Puerto Rico Francesco Piovanetti
Ferrari 488 GTE Evo M 335 +52 laps
Ferrari F154CB 3.9 L Turbo V8
33 LMGTE
Am
98 United Kingdom Aston Martin Racing Canada Paul Dalla Lana
Brazil Augusto Farfus
United Kingdom Ross Gunn
Aston Martin Vantage AMR M 333 +54 laps
Aston Martin 4.5 L Turbo V8
34 LMGTE
Am
85 Italy Iron Lynx Switzerland Rahel Frey
Denmark Michelle Gatting
Italy Manuela Gostner
Ferrari 488 GTE Evo M 332 +55 laps
Ferrari F154CB 3.9 L Turbo V8
35 LMGTE
Pro
92 Germany Porsche GT Team Denmark Michael Christensen
France Kévin Estre
Belgium Laurens Vanthoor
Porsche 911 RSR-19 M 331 +56 laps
Porsche 4.2 L Flat-6
36 LMGTE
Am
99 Germany Dempsey-Proton Racing France Julien Andlauer
Thailand Vutthikorn Inthraphuvasak
Switzerland Lucas Légeret
Porsche 911 RSR M 331 +56 laps
Porsche 4.0 L Flat-6
37 LMGTE
Am
60 Italy Iron Lynx Italy Sergio Pianazzola
Italy Paolo Ruberti
Italy Claudio Schiavoni
Ferrari 488 GTE Evo M 331 +56 laps
Ferrari F154CB 3.9 L Turbo V8
38 LMGTE
Am
78 Germany Proton Competition Italy Michele Beretta
Austria Horst Felbermayr Jr.
Netherlands Max van Splunteren
Porsche 911 RSR M 330 +57 laps
Porsche 4.0 L Flat-6
39 LMGTE
Am
54 Italy AF Corse Italy Francesco Castellaci
Italy Giancarlo Fisichella
Switzerland Thomas Flohr
Ferrari 488 GTE Evo M 330 +57 laps
Ferrari F154CB 3.9 L Turbo V8
40 LMGTE
Am
57 Germany Team Project 1 Netherlands Jeroen Bleekemolen
Brazil Felipe Fraga
United States Ben Keating
Porsche 911 RSR M 326 +61 laps
Porsche 4.0 L Flat-6
41 LMGTE
Am
62 United Kingdom Red River Racing United Kingdom Bonamy Grimes
United Kingdom Charles Hollings
United Kingdom Johnny Mowlem
Ferrari 488 GTE Evo M 325 +62 laps
Ferrari F154CB 3.9 L Turbo V8
42 LMP2 34 Poland Inter Europol Competition Austria René Binder
Russia Matevos Isaakyan
Poland Jakub ?miechowski
Ligier JS P217 M 316[N 3] +71 laps
Gibson GK428 4.2 L V8
43 LMGTE
Am
89 Germany Team Project 1 France "Steve Brooks"
Greece Andreas Laskaratos
France Julien Piguet
Porsche 911 RSR M 313 +74 laps
Porsche 4.0 L Flat-6
NC[N 4] LMGTE
Pro
71 Italy AF Corse United Kingdom Sam Bird
Spain Miguel Molina
Italy Davide Rigon
Ferrari 488 GTE Evo M 340 Not classified
Ferrari F154CB 3.9 L Turbo V8
NC[N 5] LMGTE
Am
88 Germany Dempsey-Proton Racing United States Dominique Bastien
Belgium Adrien de Leener
Austria Thomas Preining
Porsche 911 RSR M 238 Not classified
Porsche 4.0 L Flat-6
DNF LMP2 39 France SO24-Has by Graff Australia James Allen
France Vincent Capillaire
France Charles Milesi
Oreca 07 M 357 Contact
Gibson GK428 4.2 L V8
DNF LMGTE
Am
72 Taiwan Hub Auto Racing United Kingdom Tom Blomqvist
Taiwan Morris Chen
Brazil Marcos Gomes
Ferrari 488 GTE Evo M 273 Engine
Ferrari F154CB 3.9 L Turbo V8
DNF LMGTE
Am
75 Italy Iron Lynx Italy Matteo Cressoni
Italy Rino Mastronardi
Italy Andrea Piccini
Ferrari 488 GTE Evo M 211 Fire
Ferrari F154CB 3.9 L Turbo V8
DNF LMP2 21 United States DragonSpeed USA France Timothé Buret
Colombia Juan Pablo Montoya
Mexico Memo Rojas
Oreca 07 M 192 Misfire
Gibson GK428 4.2 L V8
DNF LMGTE
Pro
63 United States WeatherTech Racing United States Cooper MacNeil
United States Jeff Segal
Finland Toni Vilander
Ferrari 488 GTE Evo M 185 Collision damage
Ferrari F154CB 3.9 L Turbo V8
DNF LMGTE
Am
70 Japan MR Racing Monaco Vincent Abril
Japan Kei Cozzolino
Japan Takeshi Kimura
Ferrari 488 GTE Evo M 172 Suspension
Ferrari F154CB 3.9 L Turbo V8
DNF LMP2 16 Russia G-Drive Racing by Algarve Republic of Ireland Ryan Cullen
United Kingdom Oliver Jarvis
United Kingdom Nick Tandy
Aurus 01 G 105 Electrical
Gibson GK428 4.2 L V8
DNF LMP2 30 France Duqueine Team France Tristan Gommendy
Switzerland Jonathan Hirschi
Russia Konstantin Tereshchenko
Oreca 07 M 100 Contact
Gibson GK428 4.2 L V8
DNF LMP1 4 Austria ByKolles Racing Team France Tom Dillmann
Canada Bruno Spengler
United Kingdom Oliver Webb
ENSO CLM P1/01 M 97 Bodywork
Gibson GL458 4.5 L V8
DNF LMP2 33 Denmark High Class Racing Denmark Anders Fjordbach
United States Mark Patterson
Japan Kenta Yamashita
Oreca 07 M 88 Gearbox
Gibson GK428 4.2 L V8
DNF LMGTE
Am
52 Italy AF Corse Germany Steffen Görig
Switzerland Christoph Ulrich
Sweden Alexander West
Ferrari 488 GTE Evo M 80 Contact
Ferrari F154CB 3.9 L Turbo V8
DNF LMGTE
Am
55 Switzerland Spirit of Race United Kingdom Duncan Cameron
Republic of Ireland Matt Griffin
United Kingdom Aaron Scott
Ferrari 488 GTE Evo M 78 Puncture damage
Ferrari F154CB 3.9 L Turbo V8
DNF LMP2 11 United States EuroInternational Belgium Christophe d'Ansembourg
France Erik Maris
France Adrien Tambay
Ligier JS P217 M 26 Alternator
Gibson GK428 4.2 L V8
DSQ LMP2 37 China Jackie Chan DC Racing France Gabriel Aubry
United Kingdom Will Stevens
Netherlands Ho-Pin Tung
Oreca 07 G 141 Disqualified[N 6]
Gibson GK428 4.2 L V8

Championship standings after the race

  • Note: Only the top five positions are included for Drivers' Championship standings.
  • Note: Only the top five positions are included for the Drivers' Championship standings.

Footnotes

  1. ^ The 1968 race was postponed to September as a result of civil unrest in France.[5][6]
  2. ^ The No. 42 Cool Racing Oreca-Gibson was penalized 2 minutes 3.880 seconds for Alexandre Coigny exceeding the maximum drive time of four hours in a six hour period. The penalty demoted the car one position.[115]
  3. ^ The No. 34 Inter Europol Ligier-Gibson was penalized 9 laps plus 56 seconds for René Binder failing to meet his minimum drive time of six hours. The penalty demoted the car one position.[116]
  4. ^ The No. 71 AF Corse Ferrari was not classified for failing to complete the final lap of the race.[103]
  5. ^ The No. 88 Dempsey-Proton Porsche was not classified for failing to complete 70 per cent of the winner's distance.[98]
  6. ^ The No. 37 Jackie Chan DC Racing Oreca was disqualified for receiving outside assistance for repairs while the car was stopped on course.[73]

References

  1. ^ "Commemoration of the 90th anniversary of the Le Mans 24 Hours". Automobile Club de l'Ouest. 1 February 2013. Archived from the original on 2 June 2019. Retrieved 2019.
  2. ^ "Le Mans -- How It Began". Road & Track. 16 May 2007. Archived from the original on 11 September 2015. Retrieved 2019.
  3. ^ Hargreaves, Eilidh (13 May 2019). "An insider's guide to the Le Mans 24hours: how to experience the ultimate endurance race in style". The Daily Telegraph. Archived from the original on 30 May 2019. Retrieved 2019.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h "Standings". Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile. Archived from the original on 22 November 2020. Retrieved 2020.
  5. ^ a b c Miles, Ben (18 September 2020). "Updated: The ultimate Le Mans 24 2020 guide". Goodwood Road & Racing. Archived from the original on 2 November 2020. Retrieved 2020.
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