2015 Canarian Regional Election
Get 2015 Canarian Regional Election essential facts below. View Videos or join the 2015 Canarian Regional Election discussion. Add 2015 Canarian Regional Election to your PopFlock.com topic list for future reference or share this resource on social media.
2015 Canarian Regional Election
2015 Canarian regional election

← 2011 24 May 2015 2019 →

All 60 seats in the Parliament of the Canary Islands
31 seats needed for a majority
Opinion polls
Registered1,661,272 Green Arrow Up Darker.svg5.1%
Turnout931,876 (56.1%)
Red Arrow Down.svg2.8 pp
  First party Second party Third party
  Fernando Clavijo 2015 (cropped).jpg Portrait placeholder.svg Portrait placeholder.svg
Leader Fernando Clavijo Patricia Hernández Australia Navarro
Party CCa-PNC PSOE PP
Leader since 12 September 2014 19 October 2014 6 March 2015
Leader's seat Tenerife Tenerife Gran Canaria
Last election 21 seats, 24.9% 15 seats, 21.0% 21 seats, 31.9%
Seats won 18 15 12
Seat change Red Arrow Down.svg3 Arrow Blue Right 001.svg0 Red Arrow Down.svg9
Popular vote 166,979 182,006 170,129
Percentage 18.2% 19.9% 18.6%
Swing Red Arrow Down.svg6.7 pp Red Arrow Down.svg1.1 pp Red Arrow Down.svg13.3 pp

  Fourth party Fifth party Sixth party
  Noemí Santana 2018 Libre Canarias Digital (cropped).JPG Román Rodríguez 2017 (cropped).jpg Portrait placeholder.svg
Leader Noemí Santana Román Rodríguez Casimiro Curbelo
Party Podemos NCa ASG
Leader since 1 April 2015 26 February 2005 6 March 2015
Leader's seat Gran Canaria Gran Canaria La Gomera
Last election Did not contest 2 seats, 8.4% Did not contest
Seats won 7 5 3
Seat change Green Arrow Up Darker.svg7 Green Arrow Up Darker.svg3 Green Arrow Up Darker.svg3
Popular vote 133,044 93,634 5,090
Percentage 14.5% 10.2% 0.6%
Swing New party Green Arrow Up Darker.svg1.8 pp New party

CanaryDistrictMapParliament2015.png
Constituency results map for the Parliament of the Canary Islands

The 2015 Canarian regional election was held on Sunday, 24 May 2015, to elect the 9th Parliament of the Autonomous Community of the Canary Islands. All 60 seats in the Parliament were up for election. The election was held simultaneously with regional elections in twelve other autonomous communities and local elections all throughout Spain.

Overview

Electoral system

The Parliament of the Canary Islands was the devolved, unicameral legislature of the autonomous community of the Canary Islands, having legislative power in regional matters as defined by the Spanish Constitution and the Canarian Statute of Autonomy, as well as the ability to vote confidence in or withdraw it from a President of the Government.[1] Voting for the Parliament was on the basis of universal suffrage, which comprised all nationals over eighteen, registered in the Canary Islands and in full enjoyment of their political rights. Additionally, Canarians abroad were required to apply for voting before being permitted to vote, a system known as "begged" or expat vote (Spanish: Voto rogado).[2]

The 60 members of the Parliament of the Canary Islands were elected using the D'Hondt method and a closed list proportional representation, with a threshold of 30 percent of valid votes--which included blank ballots--being applied in each constituency. Parties not reaching the threshold were not taken into consideration for seat distribution. Alternatively, parties could also enter the seat distribution as long as they reached 6 percent regionally. Seats were allocated to constituencies, corresponding to the islands of El Hierro, Fuerteventura, Gran Canaria, La Gomera, La Palma, Lanzarote and Tenerife. Each constituency was allocated a fixed number of seats: 3 for El Hierro, 7 for Fuerteventura, 15 for Gran Canaria, 4 for La Gomera, 8 for La Palma, 8 for Lanzarote and 15 for Tenerife.[1]

The electoral law provided that parties, federations, coalitions and groupings of electors were allowed to present lists of candidates. However, groupings of electors were required to secure the signature of at least 1 percent of the electors registered in the constituency for which they sought election. Electors were barred from signing for more than one list of candidates. Concurrently, parties and federations intending to enter in coalition to take part jointly at an election were required to inform the relevant Electoral Commission within ten days of the election being called.[3][4][5]

Election date

The term of the Parliament of the Canary Islands expired four years after the date of its previous election. Elections to the Parliament were fixed for the fourth Sunday of May every four years. The previous election was held on 22 May 2011, setting the election date for the Parliament on Sunday, 24 May 2015.[1][3][4][5]

The Parliament of the Canary Islands could not be dissolved before the date of expiry of parliament except in the event of an investiture process failing to elect a regional President within a two-month period from the first ballot. In such a case, the Parliament was to be automatically dissolved and a snap election called, with elected deputies merely serving out what remained of their four-year terms.[1]

Opinion polls

The table below lists voting intention estimates in reverse chronological order, showing the most recent first and using the dates when the survey fieldwork was done, as opposed to the date of publication. Where the fieldwork dates are unknown, the date of publication is given instead. The highest percentage figure in each polling survey is displayed with its background shaded in the leading party's colour. If a tie ensues, this is applied to the figures with the highest percentages. The "Lead" column on the right shows the percentage-point difference between the parties with the highest percentages in a given poll. When available, seat projections are also displayed below the voting estimates in a smaller font. 31 seats were required for an absolute majority in the Parliament of the Canary Islands.

Results

Overall

Summary of the 24 May 2015 Parliament of the Canary Islands election results ->
CanariesParliamentDiagram2015.svg
Parties and coalitions Popular vote Seats
Votes % ±pp Total +/-
Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE) 182,006 19.89 -1.09 15 ±0
People's Party (PP) 170,129 18.59 -13.35 12 -9
Canarian Coalition-Canarian Nationalist Party (CCa-PNC) 166,979 18.25 -6.69 18 -3
We Can (Podemos) 133,044 14.54 New 7 +7
New Canaries (NCa) 93,634 10.23 +1.81 5 +3
Citizens-Party of the Citizenry (C's) 54,375 5.94 New 0 ±0
United (Unidos)1 32,868 3.59 +1.66 0 -1
Canaries Decides (IUC-LV-UP-ALTER)2 20,155 2.20 -0.76 0 ±0
Animalist Party Against Mistreatment of Animals (PACMA) 11,296 1.23 +0.93 0 ±0
Union, Progress and Democracy (UPyD) 7,819 0.85 -0.15 0 ±0
Canarian Nationalist Alternative (ANC) 5,635 0.62 -0.12 0 ±0
Gomera Socialist Group (ASG) 5,090 0.56 New 3 +3
More for Telde (+xT) 3,390 0.37 New 0 ±0
Communist Party of the Canarian People (PCPC) 1,861 0.20 -0.06 0 ±0
For a Fairer World (PUM+J) 1,827 0.20 +0.04 0 ±0
Vox (Vox) 1,814 0.20 New 0 ±0
Movement for the Unity of the Canarian People (MUPC) 1,777 0.19 +0.05 0 ±0
Zero Cuts (Recortes Cero) 1,498 0.16 New 0 ±0
Municipal Assemblies of Fuerteventura (AMF) 1,447 0.16 New 0 ±0
Blank Seats (EB) 1,363 0.15 New 0 ±0
Internationalist Solidarity and Self-Management (SAIn) 330 0.04 New 0 ±0
Blank ballots 16,769 1.83 -0.93
Total 915,106 60 ±0
Valid votes 915,106 98.20 +0.89
Invalid votes 16,770 1.80 -0.89
Votes cast / turnout 931,876 56.09 -2.82
Abstentions 729,396 43.91 +2.82
Registered voters 1,661,272
Sources[6][7]
Popular vote
PSOE
19.89%
PP
18.59%
CCa-PNC
18.25%
Podemos
14.54%
NCa
10.23%
C's
5.94%
Unidos
3.59%
Canarias Decide
2.20%
PACMA
1.23%
ASG
0.56%
Others
3.14%
Blank ballots
1.83%
Seats
CCa-PNC
30.00%
PSOE
25.00%
PP
20.00%
Podemos
11.67%
NCa
8.33%
ASG
5.00%

Distribution by constituency

Constituency PSOE PP CCa-PNC Podemos NCa ASG
% S % S % S % S % S % S
El Hierro 22.1 1 17.1 - 41.8 2 6.7 - 6.5 -
Fuerteventura 17.4 2 13.6 1 28.1 3 12.2 1 6.7 -
Gran Canaria 17.5 3 20.4 4 6.2 1 17.0 3 18.4 4
La Gomera 16.4 1 10.3 - 10.5 - 8.8 - 5.9 - 43.0 3
La Palma 24.6 2 24.7 3 30.3 3 6.5 - 2.8 -
Lanzarote 21.0 2 13.0 1 22.2 3 14.7 1 8.3 1
Tenerife 22.0 4 17.5 3 27.6 6 13.4 2 3.4 -
Total 19.9 15 18.6 12 18.2 18 14.5 7 10.2 5 0.6 3

Notes

  1. ^ a b c d Within IUC.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i Within Unidos.
  3. ^ Within Podemos.
  4. ^ Within CC.

References

Opinion poll sources
  1. ^ "El PP mantendría sin apoyos Castilla y León, Castilla-La Mancha, Murcia y La Rioja". La Razón (in Spanish). 17 May 2015.
  2. ^ "Islas Canarias: La coalición CC-PSOE necesitará otros apoyos para gobernar". La Razón (in Spanish). 17 May 2015.
  3. ^ "Islas Canarias. Encuesta mayo 2015" (PDF). La Razón (in Spanish). 17 May 2015. Archived from the original (PDF) on 4 March 2016.
  4. ^ "Triple empate en la recta final". La Opinión de Tenerife (in Spanish). 18 May 2015. Archived from the original on 20 May 2015.
  5. ^ "Estimación del voto al Parlamento de Canarias". La Opinión de Tenerife (in Spanish). 18 May 2015.[permanent dead link]
  6. ^ "CC gana, el PP sufre el mayor retroceso y entran con fuerza tres nuevos partidos". Diario de Avisos (in Spanish). 17 May 2015.
  7. ^ "CANARIAS, Mayo 2015. Sondeo Instituto Perfiles". Electograph (in Spanish). 17 May 2015.
  8. ^ "El PP se hunde y CC sería el más votado". Cadena SER (in Spanish). 20 April 2015.
  9. ^ "Una encuesta prevé la victoria de CC y la caída del PP a 13 escaños". El Día.es (in Spanish). 21 April 2015.
  10. ^ "Podemos y C's se perfilan como dos nuevos grupos del Parlamento". Diario de Avisos (in Spanish). 25 April 2015.
  11. ^ "La mayoría absoluta para un pacto de dos partidos se mueve entre uno o dos escaños". Diario de Avisos (in Spanish). 26 April 2015.
  12. ^ "CANARIAS, Abril 2015. Sondeo Instituto Perfiles". Electograph (in Spanish). 25 April 2015.
  13. ^ "Preelectoral elecciones autonómicas 2015. Comunidad Autónoma de Canarias (Estudio nº 3069. Marzo-Abril 2015)" (PDF). CIS (in Spanish). 7 May 2015.
  14. ^ "Sánchez se lanza al ataque como "única alternativa a la derecha"". La Vanguardia (in Spanish). 8 May 2015.
  15. ^ "Gobernar el Archipiélago entre dos partidos, casi imposible tras el 24-M". Diario de Avisos (in Spanish). 12 April 2015.
  16. ^ "CANARIAS, Abril 2015. Sondeo TSA". Electograph (in Spanish). 12 April 2015.
  17. ^ "El PP seguirá siendo el más votado en las CC AA pese a la caída en apoyos". La Razón (in Spanish). 20 April 2015.
  18. ^ "Islas Canarias: El binomio CC-PSOE aguanta resiste". La Razón (in Spanish). 20 April 2015.
  19. ^ "Islas Canarias. Encuesta marzo 2015" (PDF). La Razón (in Spanish). 20 April 2015. Archived from the original (PDF) on 4 March 2016.
  20. ^ "El pacto entre Coalición Canaria y el PP logra la mayoría para gobernar en 2015". La Provincia (in Spanish). 6 December 2014.
  21. ^ "El pacto entre Coalición Canaria y el PP logra la mayoría para gobernar en 2015". La Provincia (in Spanish). 6 December 2014.
  22. ^ "Encuesta Noviembre 2014". Hamalgama Métrica (in Spanish). 6 December 2014.
  23. ^ "El reparto del poder territorial en España en 2015" (PDF). desarrollando-ideas.com (in Spanish). 31 October 2014.
  24. ^ "CC, la fuerza con más escaños, el PP se hunde y el PSOE baja más". Diario de Avisos (in Spanish). 7 September 2014.
  25. ^ "Proyección del resultado de las europeas en los parlamentos autonómicos". El País (in Spanish). 31 May 2014.
  26. ^ "CC ganaría gracias al desplome del PP". Diario de Avisos (in Spanish). 2 June 2014.
  27. ^ "Un sondeo de CC refleja una victoria nacionalista, subida del PSOE y debacle del PP". Canarias7 (in Spanish). 7 December 2013. Archived from the original on 9 December 2013.
  28. ^ "PP y CC se mantienen como las fuerzas más votadas y empatan a 20 diputados". La Provincia (in Spanish). 7 December 2013.
  29. ^ "Estimación de voto al Parlamento de Canarias". La Provincia (in Spanish). 7 December 2013.
  30. ^ "Un sondeo del PSOE prevé que el PP canario perdería ocho escaños". RTVC (in Spanish). 23 February 2014.
  31. ^ "El PP ganaría de nuevo en 9 de 13 autonomías". La Razón (in Spanish). 18 November 2013.
  32. ^ "Encuesta autonómicas NC Report noviembre 2013" (PDF). La Razón (in Spanish). 18 November 2013. Archived from the original (PDF) on 3 March 2016. Retrieved 2015.
  33. ^ "El PP mantiene el poder autonómico". La Razón (in Spanish). 13 May 2013.
  34. ^ "Necesitaría pactos para gobernar en Navarra, Asturias, Canarias, Extremadura y Aragón". La Razón (in Spanish). 13 May 2013.
  35. ^ "El PP ganaría en la mayoría de las autonomías (La Razón)". Electómetro (in Spanish). 13 May 2013. Archived from the original on 4 March 2016.
Other
  1. ^ a b c d "Statute of Autonomy of the Canary Islands of 1982". Organic LawNo. 10of10 August 1982. Official State Gazette (in Spanish). Retrieved 2017.
  2. ^ Reig Pellicer, Naiara (16 December 2015). "Spanish elections: Begging for the right to vote". cafebabel.co.uk. Retrieved 2017.
  3. ^ a b "Parliament of the Canary Islands Elections Law of 2003". LawNo. 7of20 March 2003. Official Gazette of the Canary Islands (in Spanish). Retrieved 2017.
  4. ^ a b "General Electoral System Organic Law of 1985". Organic LawNo. 5of19 June 1985. Official State Gazette (in Spanish). Retrieved 2016.
  5. ^ a b "Representation of the people Institutional Act". www.juntaelectoralcentral.es. Central Electoral Commission. Retrieved 2017.
  6. ^ "2015 Election Results". parcan.es (in Spanish). Parliament of the Canary Islands. Retrieved 2017.
  7. ^ "Elecciones al Parlamento de Canarias (1983 - 2019)". Historia Electoral.com (in Spanish). Retrieved 2017.

  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

2015_Canarian_regional_election
 



 



 
Music Scenes