2011 Copa America
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2011 Copa America

2011 Copa América
Copa América Argentina 2011
2011 Copa América logo.svg
Tournament details
Host countryArgentina
Dates1-24 July
Teams12 (from 2 confederations)
Venue(s)8 (in 8 host cities)
Final positions
Champions Uruguay
Runners-up Paraguay
Third place Peru
Fourth place Venezuela
Tournament statistics
Matches played26
Goals scored54 (2.08 per match)
Attendance882,621 (33,947 per match)
Top scorer(s)Peru Paolo Guerrero
(5 goals)
Best player(s)Uruguay Luis Suárez
Best young playerUruguay Sebastián Coates
Best goalkeeperParaguay Justo Villar
Fair play award Uruguay
2007
2015

The 2011 Campeonato Sudamericano Copa América, better known as the 2011 Copa América or the Copa América 2011 Argentina, was the 43rd edition of the Copa América, the main international football tournament for national teams in South America. The competition was organized by CONMEBOL, South America's football governing body, and was held in Argentina from 1 to 24 July. The draw for the tournament was held in La Plata on 11 November 2010.

Uruguay won the tournament after defeating Paraguay 3-0 in the final, giving them a record 15th Copa América title and their first since 1995. Paraguay, as the tournament runner-up, earned the Copa Bolivia; Paraguay's performance was noteworthy, as they were able to reach the finals without winning a single game in the tournament; their success in the final stages was achieved by the way of penalty shoot-outs. Brazil were the defending champions who got knocked out by Paraguay in the quarter final after failing to convert any of the penalties.[1][2] As the tournament champion, Uruguay earned the right to represent CONMEBOL in the 2013 FIFA Confederations Cup, held in Brazil. Peru finished third after defeating Venezuela 4-1 in the third-place match.

Competing nations

Opening game: Argentina v. Bolivia.

Both Japan and Mexico were invited to join the CONMEBOL nations in the tournament.[3] Following a proposal by UEFA regarding national teams competing in tournaments organised by confederations different from their own, it was reported on 23 November 2009 that the two countries might not be able to take part in the 2011 Copa América.[4] However, on 31 March 2010, CONCACAF confirmed that Mexico would be allowed to send their 2012 U-23 Olympic Team, supplemented with five over-age players.[5] In addition to Mexico sending a weaker team than those teams sent in previous participations, eight of the Mexican players originally called to play the Copa America 2011 were suspended because of indiscipline one week before the competition started.

Japan's participation was in doubt after the 2011 T?hoku earthquake and tsunami,[6] but the Japan Football Association confirmed on 16 March 2011 that they would participate.[7] However, the Japanese FA later withdrew from the tournament on 4 April 2011 citing scheduling conflict with rescheduled J. League matches.[8][9] Following a meeting with the leadership of the Argentine Football Association, the Japanese FA decided to hold off on their final decision until 15 April.[10][11] The Japanese FA later announced on 14 April that they would compete in the competition using mainly European based players.[12] The Japanese FA withdrew their team again on 16 May citing difficulties with European clubs in releasing Japanese players.[13][14] On the next day, CONMEBOL sent a formal invitation letter to the Costa Rican Football Federation inviting Costa Rica as replacement.[15] Costa Rica accepted the invitation later that day.[16][17]

The following twelve teams, shown with pre-tournament FIFA World Rankings, played in the tournament:

Venues

A total of eight cities hosted the tournament. The opening game was played at Estadio Ciudad de La Plata, and the final was played at Estadio Monumental Antonio Vespucio Liberti.[18]

Draw

The draw for the competition took place on 11 November 2010 at 17:00 (UTC-03:00) in the Teatro Argentino de La Plata in La Plata, and was broadcast in Argentina by Canal Siete.[19][20][21] On 18 October 2010, CONMEBOL's The Executive Committee decided to place the teams in pots for the draw.[22]

Pot 1 Pot 2 Pot 3 Pot 4
 Argentina
 Brazil
 Uruguay
 Chile
 Colombia
 Paraguay
 Bolivia
 Peru
 Venezuela
 Ecuador
 Costa Rica
 Mexico

Squads

Each association presented a list of twenty-three players to compete in the tournament five days before their first match. On 14 June 2011, CONMEBOL allowed for the inscription of twenty-three players for the tournament, up one player from the previous allowed twenty-two. Of those twenty-three players, three must be goalkeepers.[23]

Match officials

The list of twenty-four referees and two extra referees selected for the tournament were announced on 6 June 2011 by CONMEBOL's Referee Commission. Two referees were chosen from each participating association:[24][25]

Extra assistants: Argentina Diego Bonfa, Hernán Maidana

Notes
  1. ^ Amarilla replaced Antonio Arias, who originally replaced Carlos Torres

Group stage

The first round, or group stage, saw the twelve teams divided into three groups of four teams.[27] Each group was a round-robin of three games, where each team played one match against each of the other teams in the same group. Teams were awarded three points for a win, one point for a draw and none for a defeat. The teams finishing first and second in each group, and the two best-placed third teams, qualified for the quarter-finals.[28]

Tie-breaking criteria

Teams were ranked on the following criteria:[29]

1. Greater number of points in all group matches
2. Goal difference in all group matches
3. Greater number of goals scored in all group matches
4. Head-to-head results
5. Penalties (Were to be taken before the final group match by two teams playing each other and tied by points 1-4. Only used as decider, if they then drew the final game.)
6. Drawing of lots by the CONMEBOL Organising Committee
Key to colors in group tables
Teams that advanced to the quarter-finals

All times are in local, Argentina Time (UTC-03:00).

Group A

Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts
 Colombia 3 2 1 0 3 0 +3 7
 Argentina 3 1 2 0 4 1 +3 5
 Costa Rica 3 1 0 2 2 4 -2 3
 Bolivia 3 0 1 2 1 5 -4 1

Group B

Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts
 Brazil 3 1 2 0 6 4 +2 5
 Venezuela 3 1 2 0 4 3 +1 5
 Paraguay 3 0 3 0 5 5 0 3
 Ecuador 3 0 1 2 2 5 -3 1

Group C

Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts
 Chile 3 2 1 0 4 2 +2 7
 Uruguay 3 1 2 0 3 2 +1 5
 Peru 3 1 1 1 2 2 0 4
 Mexico 3 0 0 3 1 4 -3 0

Ranking of third-placed teams

At the end of the first stage, a comparison was made between the third-placed teams of each group. The two best third-placed teams advanced to the quarter-finals.

Group Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts
C  Peru 3 1 1 1 2 2 0 4
B  Paraguay 3 0 3 0 5 5 0 3
A  Costa Rica 3 1 0 2 2 4 -2 3

Knockout stage

Different from previous tournaments, in the knockout stages, 30 minutes of extra time were played if any match finished tied after regulation (previously the match would go straight to a penalty shootout).[30] This was the first time in the history of the tournament where the knockout stage did not include any invited teams, as both Mexico and Costa Rica were eliminated during the group stage. Paraguay reached the final despite not having won a single match in the competition.

 
Quarter-finalsSemi-finalsFinal
 
          
 
16 July - Córdoba
 
 
 Colombia 0
 
19 July - La Plata
 
 Peru (a.e.t.) 2
 
 Peru 0
 
16 July - Santa Fe
 
 Uruguay 2
 
 Argentina 1 (4)
 
24 July - Buenos Aires
 
 Uruguay (pen.) 1 (5)
 
 Uruguay 3
 
17 July - La Plata
 
 Paraguay 0
 
 Brazil 0 (0)
 
20 July - Mendoza
 
 Paraguay (pen.) 0 (2)
 
 Paraguay (pen.) 0 (5)
 
17 July - San Juan
 
 Venezuela 0 (3) Third place play-off
 
 Chile 1
 
23 July - La Plata
 
 Venezuela 2
 
 Peru 4
 
 
 Venezuela 1
 

Quarter-finals




Semi-finals


Third place play-off

Peru 4-1 Venezuela
Chiroque Goal 41
Guerrero Goal 638990+2
Report Arango Goal 77

Final

Result

 2011 Copa América Champions 

Uruguay
15th title

Goalscorers

With five goals, Paolo Guerrero was the top scorer in the tournament. In total, 54 goals were scored by 39 different players, with only one of them credited as own goal.

5 goals
4 goals
3 goals
2 goals
1 goal
Own goal

Statistics

Discipline

Awards

Uruguay player Luis Suárez, awarded as MVP of the tournament.
Uruguayan players celebrating their 15th Copa America title.

Sponsorship

Global Platinum Sponsor:

Global Gold Sponsor:

Global Silver Sponsor:

Official Supplier:

Charitable Partner:

Local Supplier:

Web Hosting:

Theme song

"Creo en América" by Argentine singer Diego Torres was the official theme song for the tournament.[44] Torres performed the song during the opening ceremonies. Secondary theme songs of the tournament included "Don't Wanna Go Home" by Jason Derulo, "Rabiosa" by Shakira, The Child (Inside) by Qkumba Zoo and "Ready 2 Go" by Martin Solveig.[45]

References

  1. ^ Steinberg, Jacob (17 July 2011). "Brazil v Paraguay - as it happened". the Guardian. Retrieved 2019.
  2. ^ "Brazil's four missed penalties against Paraguay & five of the most shocking shootouts of all time | Goal.com". www.goal.com. Retrieved 2019.
  3. ^ "Mexico and Japan are confirmed in the 43rd edition of the Copa America". CA2011.com. 16 August 2010. Archived from the original on 3 February 2012.
  4. ^ "México podría quedarse sin Copa América 2011" (in Spanish). Medio Tiempo. 23 November 2009. Archived from the original on 25 November 2009. Retrieved 2009.
  5. ^ "Mexico to send Olympic Team". Associated Press. 31 March 2010. Retrieved 2010.
  6. ^ "World Football - J.League postponed, Copa in doubt". Eurosport. 14 March 2011. Retrieved 2011.
  7. ^ "Japón confirma a Conmebol su participación en la Copa América" [Japan confirms with CONMEBOL their participation in the Copa América] (in Spanish). sport.es. 16 March 2011. Retrieved 2011.
  8. ^ "Japón no jugará la Copa América" [Japan will not play in the Copa América] (in Spanish). ESPN Deportes. 4 April 2011. Retrieved 2011.
  9. ^ "Japan Set to Skip Copa America After Disaster". Yahoo!7. 3 April 2011. Retrieved 2011.[permanent dead link]
  10. ^ "Copa América: Japón tiene 10 días más" [Copa América: Japan has ten more days] (in Spanish). ESPN Deportes. 5 April 2011. Archived from the original on 1 May 2011. Retrieved 2011.
  11. ^ "SAMURAI BLUE(?)". Japan Football Association. 6 April 2011. Archived from the original on 13 May 2011. Retrieved 2011.
  12. ^ "Japan confirm Copa America participation". FIFA. 14 April 2011. Retrieved 2011.
  13. ^ "Japan withdraws from Copa America". Japan Football Association. 18 May 2011.
  14. ^ "Japan withdraw from Copa America". CA2011.com. 17 May 2011.
  15. ^ "Conmebol officialy [sic] invited Costa Rica to play Copa America". CA2011.com. 17 May 2011. Archived from the original on 25 July 2011.
  16. ^ "Costa Rica will play the Copa America". CA2011.com. 18 May 2011.
  17. ^ "Costa Rica Agree to Take Japan's Place at Copa America". New York Times (Reuters). 17 May 2010.
  18. ^ "Venues for the 2011 Copa America have been decided". CA2011.com. 16 August 2010.
  19. ^ "Draw of Copa America Argentina 2011 on Thursday, November 11, in La Plata". CA2011.com. 11 November 2010.
  20. ^ "Copa America draw yields intrigue". FIFA.com. 11 November 2010.
  21. ^ "Se viene el sorteo de la Copa". Olé (in Spanish). 9 November 2010. Retrieved 2010.
  22. ^ "Copa America 2011: Argentina, Brazil and Uruguay heads of series". CA2011.com. 21 October 2010.
  23. ^ "The 2011 Copa America's national teams will be able to take 23 players to the competition". CA2011.com. 14 June 2011.
  24. ^ "Referees for Copa America appointed". CA2011.com. 7 June 2011.
  25. ^ "Copa América: fueron nombrados los árbitros para el torneo" [Copa América: the referees for the tournament were named] (in Spanish). CONMEBOL. 6 June 2011. Archived from the original on 30 June 2011. Retrieved 2011.
  26. ^ "Referee Carlos Amarilla will replace Carlos Torres in the 2011 Copa America". CA2011.com. 20 June 2011.
  27. ^ "2011 Copa America groups defined". CA2011.com. 11 November 2010.
  28. ^ Official regulations (in Spanish)
  29. ^ "Regulations". CA2011.com.
  30. ^ "Announced the official regulations of 2011 Copa América". CA2011.com. 11 November 2010.
  31. ^ LG. Ca2011.com (22 July 2001.2002)Retrieved on 25 May 2014.
  32. ^ MasterCard. Ca2011.com (22 July 2002). Retrieved on 25 May 2014.
  33. ^ Santander. Ca2011.com (22 July 2002). Retrieved on 25 May 2014.
  34. ^ Kia. Ca2011.com (22 July 2002). Retrieved on 25 May 2014.
  35. ^ Claro. Ca2011.com (22 July 2002). Retrieved on 25 May 2014.
  36. ^ Telcel. Ca2011.com (22 July 2002). Retrieved on 25 May 2014.
  37. ^ Canon. Ca2011.com (22 July 2002). Retrieved on 25 May 2014.
  38. ^ Budweiser. Ca2011.com (22 July 2002). Retrieved on 25 May 2014.
  39. ^ Coca-Cola. Ca2011.com (22 July 2002). Retrieved on 25 May 2014.
  40. ^ Petrobras. Ca2011.com (22 July 2002). Retrieved on 25 May 2014.
  41. ^ Seara. Ca2011.com (22 July 2002). Retrieved on 25 May 2014.
  42. ^ UNICEF. Ca2011.com (22 July 2002). Retrieved on 25 May 2014.
  43. ^ UOL Host. Ca2011.com (22 July 2002). Retrieved on 25 May 2014.
  44. ^ Diego Torres presents official Copa América song at Obelisk. Buenos Aires Herald. 27 May 2011
  45. ^ Home | Get In! Archived 26 February 2014 at the Wayback Machine. Getinpr.com. Retrieved on 25 May 2014.

External links


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