2006 Major League Baseball Season
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2006 Major League Baseball Season

2006 MLB season
LeagueMajor League Baseball
SportBaseball
DurationApril 2 - October 27, 2006
Number of games162
Number of teams30
Draft
Top draft pickLuke Hochevar
Picked byKansas City Royals
Regular Season
Season MVPAL: Justin Morneau (MIN)
NL: Ryan Howard (PHI)
League Postseason
AL championsDetroit Tigers
  AL runners-upOakland Athletics
NL championsSt. Louis Cardinals
  NL runners-upNew York Mets
World Series
ChampionsSt. Louis Cardinals
  Runners-upDetroit Tigers
World Series MVPDavid Eckstein (STL)
MLB seasons

The 2006 Major League Baseball season ended with the National League's St. Louis Cardinals winning the World Series with the lowest regular-season victory total (83) in a fully-played season in major league history. The Atlanta Braves failed to qualify for the postseason for the first time since 1990. Individual achievements included Barry Bonds who, despite questions surrounding his alleged steroid use and involvement in the BALCO scandal, surpassed Babe Ruth for second place on the career home runs list. The American League continued its domination at the All-Star Game by winning its fourth straight game, and ninth of the prior 10 contests (the 2002 game was a tie).

Standings

Postseason

Bracket

  Division Series
(ALDS, NLDS)
League Championship Series
(NLCS, ALCS)
World Series
                           
  1 NY Yankees 1  
4 Detroit 3  
  4 Detroit 4  
American League
  3 Oakland 0  
2 Minnesota 0
  3 Oakland 3  
    AL4 Detroit 1
  NL3 St. Louis 4
  1 NY Mets 3  
4 LA Dodgers 0  
  1 NY Mets 3
National League
  3 St. Louis 4  
2 San Diego 1
  3 St. Louis 3  

All-Star game

Awards

Other awards

Player of the Month

Pitcher of the Month

Rookie of the Month

Statistical leaders

Managers

American League

National League

±hosted the MLB All Star Game

Milestones

300-300 Club members

Home Runs

The following players reached major home run milestones in 2006:

Barry Bonds' countdown to 715

  • May 21 -- reached 714 career homers, tying Babe Ruth for second all time
  • May 28 -- reached 715 career homers, passing Ruth for second all time

400 career homers

300 career homers

200 career homers

Entry into the top 500

Pitching

Hitting

  • Alfonso Soriano of the Washington Nationals become only the fourth player to join the 40-40 Club, joining José Canseco, Barry Bonds, and Alex Rodriguez when he stole his 40th base of the season on September 16. Six days later he became the first person ever to reach 40 home runs, 40 stolen bases and 40 doubles in one season.

Other achievements

  • Matt Holliday hit the longest home run of the season in MLB against the San Francisco Giants on September 19 with an official distance of 443 feet (135 m); HitTracker estimated it at 496 feet (151 m).[1]

Home Field Attendance & Payroll

Team Name Wins Home attendance Per Game Est. Payroll
New York Yankees[2] 97 2.1% 4,248,067 3.8% 52,445 $194,663,079 -6.5%
Los Angeles Dodgers[3] 88 23.9% 3,758,545 4.3% 46,402 $98,447,187 18.6%
St. Louis Cardinals[4] 83 -17.0% 3,407,104 -3.7% 42,589 $88,891,371 -3.5%
Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim[5] 89 -6.3% 3,406,790 0.1% 42,059 $103,472,000 9.1%
New York Mets[6] 97 16.9% 3,379,535 19.4% 41,723 $101,584,963 0.3%
San Francisco Giants[7] 76 1.3% 3,130,313 -1.6% 38,646 $90,056,419 -0.2%
Chicago Cubs[8] 66 -16.5% 3,123,215 0.7% 38,558 $94,424,499 8.5%
Houston Astros[9] 82 -7.9% 3,022,763 7.8% 37,318 $100,894,435 31.4%
Chicago White Sox[10] 90 -9.1% 2,957,414 26.2% 36,511 $102,750,667 36.7%
Boston Red Sox[11] 86 -9.5% 2,930,588 2.9% 36,180 $120,099,824 -2.8%
Philadelphia Phillies[12] 85 -3.4% 2,701,815 1.4% 33,356 $88,273,333 -7.6%
San Diego Padres[13] 88 7.3% 2,659,757 -7.3% 32,837 $69,896,141 10.4%
Detroit Tigers[14] 95 33.8% 2,595,937 28.2% 32,049 $82,612,866 19.6%
Atlanta Braves[15] 79 -12.2% 2,550,524 1.2% 31,488 $90,156,876 4.3%
Seattle Mariners[16] 78 13.0% 2,481,165 -9.0% 30,632 $87,959,833 0.2%
Texas Rangers[17] 80 1.3% 2,388,757 -5.4% 29,491 $68,228,662 22.2%
Milwaukee Brewers[18] 75 -7.4% 2,335,643 5.6% 28,835 $57,970,333 45.2%
Toronto Blue Jays[19] 87 8.8% 2,302,212 14.3% 28,422 $71,365,000 56.1%
Minnesota Twins[20] 96 15.7% 2,285,018 12.3% 28,210 $63,396,006 12.8%
Baltimore Orioles[21] 70 -5.4% 2,153,139 -18.0% 26,582 $72,585,582 -1.8%
Washington Nationals[22] 71 -12.3% 2,153,056 -21.2% 26,581 $63,143,000 30.0%
Cincinnati Reds[23] 80 9.6% 2,134,607 9.9% 26,353 $60,909,519 -1.6%
Colorado Rockies[24] 76 13.4% 2,104,362 9.9% 25,980 $41,233,000 -13.8%
Arizona Diamondbacks[25] 76 -1.3% 2,091,685 1.6% 25,823 $59,984,226 -4.2%
Cleveland Indians[26] 78 -16.1% 1,997,995 -0.8% 24,667 $56,031,500 35.0%
Oakland Athletics[27] 93 5.7% 1,976,625 -6.3% 24,403 $64,843,079 17.0%
Pittsburgh Pirates[28] 67 0.0% 1,861,549 2.4% 22,982 $46,717,750 22.5%
Kansas City Royals[29] 62 10.7% 1,372,638 0.1% 16,946 $47,694,000 29.3%
Tampa Bay Devil Rays[30] 61 -9.0% 1,368,950 19.9% 16,901 $34,917,967 17.7%
Florida Marlins[31] 78 -6.0% 1,164,134 -37.2% 14,372 $14,671,500 -75.7%

Events

See also

References

  1. ^ Beinhoff, Drew (September 20, 2006). "You gotta love Matt Holliday". Real Clear Sports. Archived from the original on March 3, 2016. Retrieved 2014.
  2. ^ "New York Yankees Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2020.
  3. ^ "Los Angeles Dodgers Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2020.
  4. ^ "St. Louis Cardinals Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2020.
  5. ^ "Los Angeles Angels Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2020.
  6. ^ "New York Mets Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2020.
  7. ^ "San Francisco Giants Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2020.
  8. ^ "Chicago Cubs Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2020.
  9. ^ "Cleveland Indians Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2020.
  10. ^ "Chicago White Sox Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2020.
  11. ^ "Boston Red Sox Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2020.
  12. ^ "Oakland Athletics Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2020.
  13. ^ "San Diego Padres Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2020.
  14. ^ "Detroit Tigers Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2020.
  15. ^ "Atlanta Braves Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2020.
  16. ^ "Seattle Mariners Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2020.
  17. ^ "Texas Rangers Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2020.
  18. ^ "Milwaukee Brewers Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2020.
  19. ^ "Toronto Blue Jays Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2020.
  20. ^ "Minnesota Twins Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2020.
  21. ^ "Baltimore Orioles Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2020.
  22. ^ "Washington Nationals Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2020.
  23. ^ "Cincinnati Reds Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2020.
  24. ^ "Colorado Rockies Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2020.
  25. ^ "Arizona Diamondbacks Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2020.
  26. ^ "Cleveland Indians Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2020.
  27. ^ "Oakland Athletics Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2020.
  28. ^ "Pittsburgh Pirates Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2020.
  29. ^ "Kansas City Royals Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2020.
  30. ^ "Tampa Bay Rays Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2020.
  31. ^ "Florida Marlins Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2020.
  32. ^ "Charlton's Baseball Chronology". www.baseballlibrary.com. Archived from the original on August 1, 2013. Retrieved 2013.

External links


  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

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