1983 Auburn Tigers Football Team
Get 1983 Auburn Tigers Football Team essential facts below. View Videos or join the 1983 Auburn Tigers Football Team discussion. Add 1983 Auburn Tigers Football Team to your PopFlock.com topic list for future reference or share this resource on social media.
1983 Auburn Tigers Football Team
1983 Auburn Tigers football
Auburn Tigers logo.svg
National champion (Billingsley, FR, The New York Times)
Co-national champion (Rothman, Sagarin)
SEC champion
Sugar Bowl champion
ConferenceSoutheastern Conference
Ranking
CoachesNo. 3
APNo. 3
1983 record11-1 (6-0 SEC)
Head coach
Offensive coordinatorJack Crowe (2nd season)
Offensive schemeWishbone
Defensive coordinatorFrank Orgel (3rd season)
Home stadiumJordan-Hare Stadium
Seasons
← 1982
1984 →
1983 Southeastern Conference football standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   T     W   L   T
No. 3 Auburn $ 6 0 0     11 1 0
No. 4 Georgia 5 1 0     10 1 1
No. 6 Florida 4 2 0     9 2 1
Tennessee 4 2 0     9 3 0
No. 15 Alabama 4 2 0     8 4 0
Ole Miss 4 2 0     6 6 0
Kentucky 2 4 0     6 5 1
Mississippi State 1 5 0     3 8 0
LSU 0 6 0     4 7 0
Vanderbilt 0 6 0     2 9 0
  • $ – Conference champion
Rankings from AP Poll

The 1983 Auburn Tigers football team represented Auburn University in the 1983 NCAA Division I-A football season. Coached by Pat Dye, the team finished the season with an 11-1 record and won their first Southeastern Conference (SEC) title since 1957. The team was named national champion by NCAA-designated major selectors of Billingsley, College Football Researchers Association, and The New York Times, while named co-national champion by both Rothman and Sagarin.[1]

Season

The squad featured several star players who went on to long professional careers including Bo Jackson, Randy Campbell, Tommie Agee, Lionel James, Donnie Humphrey, Steve Wallace and Al Del Greco. Prior to the season, Dye became the first coach in the SEC to require players to take blood and urine tests for drugs.[2] Also prior to the season, fullback Greg Pratt collapsed after making his required time in running tests and died a short time later.

The team capped a stellar 11-1 season, with a 9-7 victory over Michigan in the Sugar Bowl. Despite entering the bowl games ranked third in both major polls, and with both teams ranked higher losing their bowl games, the Tigers ended ranked third in the final AP and the UPI Coaches' poll as Miami jumped from 5th from the AP and 4th from the UPI Coaches' poll to claim the AP/UPI Coaches' National Championship award.[3] Auburn had played the toughest schedule in the nation, including nine bowl teams, eight of which were ranked in the top 20 (five in the top ten), and two teams Auburn faced would compete against each other in the 1983 Florida Citrus Bowl (Tennessee won the game against Maryland 30-23). Also, Auburn beat Florida by a touchdown 28-21, the same Florida team that defeated Miami in the beginning of the season by a 28-3 score.

Schedule

DateTimeOpponentRankSiteTVResultAttendance
September 10Southern Miss*No. 4W 24-373,500
September 1711:30 am CDTNo. 3 Texas*No. 5
  • Jordan-Hare Stadium
  • Auburn, Alabama
CBSL 7-2073,500
September 24at TennesseeNo. 11W 37-1495,185
October 1Florida State*No. 10
  • Jordan-Hare Stadium
  • Auburn, Alabama
W 27-2475,625
October 8at KentuckyNo. 7W 49-2157,989
October 15at Georgia Tech*No. 5W 31-1355,112
October 22Mississippi StateNo. 5
  • Jordan-Hare Stadium
  • Auburn, Alabama
W 28-1371,500
October 29No. 5 FloridaNo. 4
  • Jordan-Hare Stadium
  • Auburn, Alabama (rivalry)
CBSW 28-2175,700
November 5No. 7 Maryland*No. 3
  • Jordan-Hare Stadium
  • Auburn, Alabama
W 35-2375,600
November 122:50 pm CSTat No. 4 GeorgiaNo. 3ABCW 13-782,122
December 32:50 pm CSTvs. No. 19 AlabamaNo. 3ABCW 23-2077,310
January 2, 19847:00 pm CSTvs. No. 8 Michigan*No. 3ABCW 9-777,893
  • *Non-conference game
  • Rankings from AP Poll released prior to the game

Roster

Rankings

Ranking movements
Legend: Increase in ranking. Decrease in ranking.
NR = Not ranked. RV = Received votes. ? = Tied with team above or below. ( ) = First place votes.
Week
Poll Pre 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 Final
AP 5 (2) 4 (1) 5 11 10 7 5 5 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 (7)
Coaches 3 (3) 3 (1) 4 14 10 10 8 5 5 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 (4)

Season summary

Southern Miss


Texas


Florida State


Florida

[4]

at Georgia

1 234Total
No. 3 Auburn 7 600 13
No. 4 Georgia 0 007 7
  • Date: November 12
  • Location: Sanford Stadium
  • Game attendance: 82,122
  • TV announcers (ABC): Keith Jackson and Frank Broyles


[5]

vs. Alabama

1 234Total
No. 19 Alabama 0 1460 20
No. 3 Auburn 0 10130 23


Sophomore Bo Jackson ran for 256 yards and 2 touchdowns as the Tigers won the SEC title outright. His long touchdown runs – 69 yards and 71 yards, respectively – bookended the day's scoring.[6]

vs. Michigan (Sugar Bowl)

1 234Total
Michigan 7 000 7
Auburn 0 036 9


[7]

References

  1. ^ 2018 NCAA Football Bowl Subdivision Records (PDF). National Collegiate Athletic Association. August 2018. p. 114. Retrieved 2019.
  2. ^ "Auburn Testing Players for Drugs". New York Times. 1983-08-22. Retrieved .
  3. ^ Barnhart, Tony. "Auburn Wins 1984 Sugar Bowl, but National Championship Still Eludes Tigers". The Atlanta Journal-Constitution/CBS. Retrieved .
  4. ^ "FLORIDA IS BEATEN BY AUBURN, 28-21". The New York Times. October 30, 1983. Retrieved 2019.
  5. ^ Gainesville Sun. 1983 Nov 13. Retrieved 2018-Nov-12.
  6. ^ "AUBURN SETS BACK ALABAMA BY 23-20". The New York Times. December 4, 1983. Retrieved 2019.
  7. ^ "TIGERS SET BACK MICHIGAN BY 9-7". The New York Times. January 2, 1984. Retrieved 2019.



  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

1983_Auburn_Tigers_football_team
 



 



 
Music Scenes