1975 Major League Baseball Season
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1975 Major League Baseball Season

1975 MLB season
LeagueMajor League Baseball
SportBaseball
DurationApril 7 - October 22, 1975
Number of games162
Number of teams24
Draft
Top draft pickDanny Goodwin
Picked byCalifornia Angels
Regular season
Season MVPAL: Fred Lynn (BOS)
NL: Joe Morgan (CIN)
Postseason
AL championsBoston Red Sox
  AL runners-upOakland Athletics
NL championsCincinnati Reds
  NL runners-upPittsburgh Pirates
World Series
ChampionsCincinnati Reds
  Runners-upBoston Red Sox
World Series MVPPete Rose (CIN)
MLB seasons

The 1975 Major League Baseball season saw Frank Robinson become the first black manager in the Major Leagues. He managed the Cleveland Indians.

At the All-Star Break, there were discussions of Bowie Kuhn's reappointment. Charlie Finley, New York owner George Steinbrenner and Baltimore owner Jerry Hoffberger were part of a group that wanted him gone.[1] Finley was trying to convince the new owner of the Texas Rangers Brad Corbett that MLB needed a more dynamic commissioner.[2] During the vote, Baltimore and New York decided to vote in favour of the commissioner's reappointment. In addition, there were discussions of expansion for 1977, with Seattle and Washington, D.C. as the proposed cities for expansion.

Standings

Postseason

Bracket

  League Championship Series
(ALCS, NLCS)
World Series
                 
East Boston 3  
West Oakland 0  
    AL Boston 3
  NL Cincinnati 4
East Pittsburgh 0
West Cincinnati 3  

Awards and honors

Statistical leaders

Home Field Attendance

Team Name Wins Home attendance Per Game
Los Angeles Dodgers[3] 88 -13.7% 2,539,349 -3.5% 31,350
Cincinnati Reds[4] 108 10.2% 2,315,603 7.0% 28,588
Philadelphia Phillies[5] 86 7.5% 1,909,233 5.6% 23,571
Boston Red Sox[6] 95 13.1% 1,748,587 12.3% 21,587
New York Mets[7] 82 15.5% 1,730,566 0.5% 21,365
St. Louis Cardinals[8] 82 -4.7% 1,695,270 -7.8% 20,674
New York Yankees[9] 83 -6.7% 1,288,048 1.2% 16,513
San Diego Padres[10] 71 18.3% 1,281,747 19.2% 15,824
Pittsburgh Pirates[11] 92 4.5% 1,270,018 14.4% 15,875
Milwaukee Brewers[12] 68 -10.5% 1,213,357 27.0% 14,980
Kansas City Royals[13] 91 18.2% 1,151,836 -1.8% 14,220
Texas Rangers[14] 79 -6.0% 1,127,924 -5.5% 14,099
Oakland Athletics[15] 98 8.9% 1,075,518 27.2% 13,278
Detroit Tigers[16] 57 -20.8% 1,058,836 -14.8% 13,235
California Angels[17] 72 5.9% 1,058,163 15.4% 13,064
Chicago Cubs[18] 75 13.6% 1,034,819 1.9% 12,776
Baltimore Orioles[19] 90 -1.1% 1,002,157 4.1% 13,015
Cleveland Indians[20] 79 2.6% 977,039 -12.3% 12,213
Montreal Expos[21] 75 -5.1% 908,292 -10.9% 11,213
Houston Astros[22] 64 -21.0% 858,002 -21.3% 10,593
Chicago White Sox[23] 75 -6.3% 750,802 -34.7% 9,269
Minnesota Twins[24] 76 -7.3% 737,156 11.3% 8,990
Atlanta Braves[25] 67 -23.9% 534,672 -45.5% 6,683
San Francisco Giants[26] 80 11.1% 522,919 0.6% 6,456

Notable events

  • August 14 - Atlanta Braves pitcher Phil Niekro hits the only triple of his Major League career, off the pitching of Lynn McGlothen of the St Louis Cardinals.[27]

References

  1. ^ Charlie Finley: The Outrageous Story of Baseball's Super Showman, p.226, G. Michael Green and Roger D. Launius. Walker Publishing Company, New York, 2010, ISBN 978-0-8027-1745-0
  2. ^ Charlie Finley: The Outrageous Story of Baseball's Super Showman, p.227, G. Michael Green and Roger D. Launius. Walker Publishing Company, New York, 2010, ISBN 978-0-8027-1745-0
  3. ^ "Los Angeles Dodgers Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2020.
  4. ^ "Cincinnati Reds Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2020.
  5. ^ "Oakland Athletics Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2020.
  6. ^ "Boston Red Sox Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2020.
  7. ^ "New York Mets Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2020.
  8. ^ "St. Louis Cardinals Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2020.
  9. ^ "New York Yankees Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2020.
  10. ^ "San Diego Padres Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2020.
  11. ^ "Pittsburgh Pirates Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2020.
  12. ^ "Milwaukee Brewers Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2020.
  13. ^ "Kansas City Royals Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2020.
  14. ^ "Texas Rangers Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2020.
  15. ^ "Oakland Athletics Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2020.
  16. ^ "Detroit Tigers Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2020.
  17. ^ "Los Angeles Angels Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2020.
  18. ^ "Chicago Cubs Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2020.
  19. ^ "Baltimore Orioles Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2020.
  20. ^ "Cleveland Indians Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2020.
  21. ^ "Washington Nationals Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2020.
  22. ^ "Cleveland Indians Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2020.
  23. ^ "Chicago White Sox Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2020.
  24. ^ "Minnesota Twins Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2020.
  25. ^ "Atlanta Braves Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2020.
  26. ^ "San Francisco Giants Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2020.
  27. ^ Paschal, John. "Once Upon A Time: When Hall of Famers Go One-And-Done". tht.fangraphs.com. Retrieved 2019.

External links


  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

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