Winter
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Winter
See also: Winter

English

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Wikipedia

Alternative forms

Etymology

From Middle English winter, from Old English winter, from Proto-Germanic *wintruz ("winter"). Cognate with West Frisian winter ("winter"), Dutch winter ("winter"), German Winter ("winter"), Danish, Swedish and Norwegian vinter ("winter"), Icelandic vetur ("winter").

Pronunciation

Noun

winter (countable and uncountable, plural winters)

Winter in Austria
  1. Traditionally the fourth of the four seasons, typically regarded as being from December 23 to March 20 in continental regions of the Northern Hemisphere or the months of June, July and August in the Southern Hemisphere. It is the time when the sun is lowest in the sky, resulting in short days, and the time of year with the lowest atmospheric temperatures for the region.
    • a1420, The British Museum Additional MS, 12,056, "Wounds complicated by the Dislocation of a Bone", in Robert von Fleischhacker, editor, Lanfranc's "Science of cirurgie."[1], London: K. Paul, Trench, Trübner & Co, translation of original by Lanfranc of Milan, published 1894, ->ISBN, page 63:
      Ne take noon hede to brynge togidere þe parties of þe boon þat is to-broken or dislocate, til viij. daies ben goon in þe wyntir, & v. in þe somer; for þanne it schal make quytture, and be sikir from swellynge; & þanne brynge togidere þe brynkis eiþer þe disiuncture after þe techynge þat schal be seid in þe chapitle of algebra.
    • 1592, Shakespeare, Henry VI, Part 1:
      And after summer evermore succeeds / Barren winter, with his wrathful nipping cold.
    • 1646, Thomas Browne, "Of the Cameleon", in Pseudodoxia Epidemica: Or, Enquiries into Very Many Received Tenents, and Commonly Presumed Truths, London: Printed for Tho. Harper for Edvvard Dod, OCLC 838860010; Pseudodoxia Epidemica: Or, Enquiries into Very Many Received Tenents, and Commonly Presumed Truths. [...], 2nd corrected and much enlarged edition, London: Printed by A. Miller, for Edw[ard] Dod and Nath. Ekins, [...], 1650, OCLC 152706203, book 3, page 133:
      It cannot be denied it [the chameleon] is (if not the most of any) a very abstemious animall, and such as by reason of its frigidity, paucity of bloud, and latitancy in the winter (about which time the observations are often made) will long subsist without a visible sustentation.
    • 1785, William Cowper, "Tirocinium: or, A Review of Schools." in The Poems of William Cowper, Vol. II., The Press of C. Whittingham (1822), page 174:
      There shall he learn, ere sixteen winters old, / That [...]
    • 1897, William Morris, The Water of the Wondrous Isles, Vol. I, Longmans, Green and Co. (1914), page 2:
      [...] a woman, tall, and strong of aspect, of some thirty winters by seeming, [...]
  2. (figuratively, poetic) The period of decay, old age, death, or the like.
    • (Can we date this quote?), William Wordsworth, (Please provide the book title or journal name):
      Life's autumn past, I stand on winter's verge.
  3. (obsolete) An appliance to be fixed on the front of a grate, to keep a kettle warm, etc.

Usage notes

Note that season names are not capitalized in modern English unless at the beginning of a sentence, for example, I can't wait for spring to arrive. Exceptions occur when the the season is personified, as in Old Man Winter, is used as part of a name, as in the Winter War, or is used as a given name, as in Summer Glau. This is contrast to the days of the week and months of the year, which are always capitalized (Thursday or September).

Hyponyms

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

See also

Seasons in English · seasons (layout · text)
spring summer fall, autumn winter

Verb

winter (third-person singular simple present winters, present participle wintering, simple past and past participle wintered)

  1. (intransitive) To spend the winter (in a particular place).
    When they retired, they hoped to winter in Florida.
  2. (transitive) To store something (for instance animals) somewhere over winter to protect it from cold.

Derived terms

Translations

Anagrams


Afrikaans

Etymology

From Dutch winter.

Noun

winter (plural winters)

  1. winter

Alemannic German

Alternative forms

Etymology

From Middle High German winter, from Old High German wintar, from Proto-Germanic *wintruz. Cognate with German Winter, Dutch winter, English winter, Swedish vinter.

Noun

winter m

  1. (Issime, Carcoforo) winter

See also

Seasons in Alemannic German · Italian Walser (layout · text)
Carcoforo: ustog
Formazza: langsé
Gressoney: ustag
Issime: oustaga
Rimella: üstàg
?chummer
summer
sòmmer
summer
?chumer
herbscht
herbscht
herbscht
hérbscht
harpscht
winter
wénter
wénter
winter
wenter

References

  • "winter" in Patuzzi, Umberto, ed., (2013) Ünsarne Börtar [Our Words], Luserna, Italy: Comitato unitario delle linguistiche storiche germaniche in Italia / Einheitskomitee der historischen deutschen Sprachinseln in Italien

Dutch

Etymology

From Middle Dutch winter, from Old Dutch winter, from Proto-Germanic *wintruz.

Pronunciation

Noun

winter m (plural winters, diminutive wintertje n)

  1. winter

Descendants

  • Afrikaans: winter

See also


Middle Dutch

Etymology

From Old Dutch winter, from Proto-Germanic *wintruz.

Noun

winter m

  1. winter

Inflection

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Derived terms

Descendants

Further reading

  • "winter", in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000

Verwijs, E.; Verdam, J. (1885-1929), "winter", in Middelniederlandsch Woordenboek, The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff, ->ISBN


Middle English

Alternative forms

Etymology

From Old English winter; in turn from Proto-Germanic *wintruz.

Pronunciation

Noun

winter (plural winteres or winters)

  1. winter

Descendants

See also

Seasons in Middle English · sesounes (layout · text)
lenten, spring somer hervest, autumpne winter

Old Dutch

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *wintruz.

Noun

winter m

  1. winter

Inflection

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants

Further reading

  • "winter", in Oudnederlands Woordenboek, 2012

Old English

Alternative forms

Etymology

From earlier *wintr < *wintru, from Proto-Germanic *wintruz. Cognate with Old Frisian winter, Old Saxon wintar, Old Dutch winter, Old High German wintar, Old Norse vetr, Gothic ? (wintrus).

Pronunciation

Noun

winter m

  1. winter
  2. year

Declension

Derived terms

Descendants

See also

Seasons in Old English · t?de (layout · text)
lencten ("spring") sumor ("summer") hærfest ("autumn") winter ("winter")

Scots

Etymology

From Middle English winter, from Old English winter, from Proto-Germanic *wintruz.

Noun

winter (plural winters)

  1. winter

West Frisian

Etymology

From Old Frisian winter, from Proto-Germanic *wintruz.

Pronunciation

Noun

winter c (plural winters, diminutive winterke)

  1. winter

Derived terms

Further reading

  • "winter", in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

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