Tranquil
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Tranquil

English

Etymology

Borrowed from Middle French tranquille, from Latin tranquillus.

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /'t?æ?.kw?l/
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Adjective

tranquil (comparative tranquiler, superlative tranquilest)

  1. Free from emotional or mental disturbance.
    • 1847, Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre, chapter XXVIII
      Some time passed before I felt tranquil even here: I had a vague dread that wild cattle might be near, or that some sportsman or poacher might discover me.
  2. Calm; without motion or sound.
    • 1921, Douglas Wilson Johnson, Battlefields of the World War, Western and Southern Fronts: A Study in Military Geography, page 262:
      [...] that the streams which did form were clear and tranquil because fed by perennial springs from the underground supply; and that in their tranquil waters extensive peat bogs formed.

Synonyms

Antonyms

  • (free from emotional disturbance): agitated

Related terms

Translations

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Catalan

Etymology

From Latin tranquillus.

Pronunciation

Adjective

tranquil (feminine tranquil·la, masculine plural tranquils, feminine plural tranquil·les)

  1. tranquil, calm (free from emotional disturbance)
  2. tranquil, calm (without motion or sound)
    Synonym: calm
    Antonym: agitat

Derived terms

Related terms

Further reading


Piedmontese

Pronunciation

Adjective

tranquil

  1. tranquil

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