Tout
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Tout
See also: toût

English

Etymology 1

From a dialectal form of toot ("to stick out; project; peer out; peep"), itself from Middle English toten, from Old English t?tian ("to peep out; look; pry; spectate").

Pronunciation

Noun

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

tout (plural touts)

  1. Someone advertising for customers in an aggressive way.
    • 1886, Henry James, The Princess Casamassima.
      Paul Muniment looked at his young friend a moment. 'Do you want to know what he is? He's a tout.'
      'A tout? What do you mean?'
      'Well, a cat's-paw, if you like better.'
      Hyacinth stared. 'For whom, pray?'
      'Or a fisherman, if you like better still. I give you your choice of comparisons. I made them up as we came along in the hansom. He throws his nets and hauls in the little fishes--the pretty little shining, wriggling fishes. They are all for her; she swallows, 'em down.'
  2. A person, at a racecourse, who offers supposedly inside information on which horse is likely to win.
    • 1905, Baroness Emmuska Orczy, chapter 2, in The Hocussing of Cigarette[1]:
      No one, however, would have anything to do with him, as Mr. Keeson's orders in those respects were very strict ; he had often threatened any one of his employés with instant dismissal if he found him in company with one of these touts.
  3. (colloquial, archaic) A spy for a smuggler, thief, or similar.
Synonyms
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

tout (third-person singular simple present touts, present participle touting, simple past and past participle touted)

  1. (transitive) To flaunt, to publicize/publicise; to boast or brag; to promote.
    • 2016 January 25, "Why Arabs would regret a toothless Chinese dragon," The National (retrieved 25 January 2016):
      China has touted its policy of non-interference for decades.
    • 2012, Scott Tobias, The Hunger Games, The A.V. Club
      For the 75 years since a district rebellion was put down, The Games have existed as an assertion of the Capital's power, a winner-take-all contest that touts heroism and sacrifice--participants are called "tributes"-- while pitting the districts against each other.
    • 2018, James Lambert, "A multitude of 'lishes': The nomenclature of hybridity", in English World-Wide[2], page 9:
      Newspaper articles also were generally positive in tone, although a tendency towards sensationalism means that the spread of hybrid forms is occasionally touted as the universal language of the future.
  2. (obsolete) To look upon or watch.
  3. (Britain, slang, horse-racing, transitive) To spy out information about (a horse, a racing stable, etc.).
  4. (US, slang, horse-racing, transitive) To give a tip on (a racehorse) to a person, with the expectation of sharing in any winnings.
  5. (Britain, slang, horse-racing, intransitive) To spy out the movements of racehorses at their trials, or to get by stealth or other improper means the secrets of the stable, for betting purposes.
  6. (US, slang, horse-racing, intransitive) To act as a tout; to give a tip on a racehorse.
  7. (intransitive) To look for, try to obtain; used with for.
    To understand the new London, I lived it. I slept rough with Roma beggars and touted for work with Baltic laborers on the kerb. (Ben Judah on BBC Business Daily, March 1, 2016)
Synonyms
Translations

Etymology 2

Probably from French tout ("all").

Noun

tout

  1. (card games) In the game of solo, a proposal to win all eight tricks.
See also

French

Etymology

From Middle French tout, from Old French tot, from Latin t?tus; compare Catalan tot, Italian tutto, Portuguese todo, Romanian tot, Spanish todo.

Pronunciation

Adjective

tout (feminine singular toute, masculine plural tous, feminine plural toutes)

  1. all

Pronoun

tout (plural tous)

  1. everything

Adverb

tout

  1. all

Further reading


Haitian Creole

Etymology

From French tout ("all").

Adjective

tout

  1. all

Adverb

tout

  1. all

Middle French

Etymology

From Old French tot.

Adjective

tout m (feminine singular toute, masculine plural tous, feminine plural toutes)

  1. all; all of
    toute la nuit
    all (of the) night

Adverb

tout (feminine singular toute, masculine plural tous, feminine plural toutes)

  1. all (intensifier)
    • 1488, Jean Dupré, Lancelot du Lac, page 45:
      Et moult y avoit de gens tout autour pour regarder la iustice de la damoiselle
      And there were many people all around to watch the justice afforded to the lady
  2. completely; totally; entirely

Usage notes

  • Like French tout, when used as an intensifier it may inflect according to the gender and the number of what it is describing:
    Elle est toute morte - she is completely dead
  • The uninflected form tout is always used for describing terms that don't inflect with gender, such as verbs, adverbs and prepositions:
    y avoit de gens tout autour - there were people all around
    (tout qualifies the preposition autour)

Descendants

  • French: tout

Norman

Etymology

From Old French tot, from Latin t?tus.

Pronunciation

  • (file)

Adjective

tout m

  1. (Jersey, Guernsey) all

Derived terms

Adverb

tout

  1. (Jersey, Guernsey) all

Scots

Verb

tout

  1. (intransitive) To pout.

Noun

tout (plural touts)

  1. A fit of sulking; a pet.
  2. A sudden illness.

Derived terms


  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

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