Stimulus
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Stimulus
See also: Stimulus

English

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin stimulus ("goad, prick")

Pronunciation

Noun

stimulus (plural stimuluses or stimuli)

  1. (Can we clean up(+) this sense?) Any external phenomenon that has an influence on a system, by triggering or modifying an internal phenomenon.
    an economic stimulus
    • 2012 November 7, Matt Bai, "Winning a Second Term, Obama Will Confront Familiar Headwinds", in New York Times[1]:
      Democrats, meanwhile, point out that Republicans seem to have made a conscious decision, beginning with the stimulus, to oppose anything the president put forward, dooming any chance of renewed cooperation between the parties.
  2. (Can we clean up(+) this sense?) (physiology) Something external that elicits or influences a physiological or psychological activity or response.
  3. (Can we clean up(+) this sense?) (psychology) Anything effectively impinging upon any of the sensory apparatuses of a living organism, including physical phenomena both internal and external to the body.
  4. (Can we clean up(+) this sense?) Anything that induces a person to take action.

Synonyms

Translations

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Esperanto

Verb

stimulus

  1. conditional of stimuli

French

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin stimulus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sti.my.lys/
  • (file)

Noun

stimulus m (plural stimulus or stimuli)

  1. stimulus

Further reading


Latin

Etymology

From Proto-Indo-European *stey?- ("to pierce, prick, be sharp"). Cognate with Ancient Greek (stíz?, "I mark").

Pronunciation

Noun

stimulus m (genitive stimul?); second declension

  1. a goad, prick
  2. a sting
  3. (figurative) stimulus, incentive

Declension

Second-declension noun.

Related terms

Descendants

References


Norwegian Bokmål

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Etymology

Probably from Latin

Noun

stimulus m (definite singular stimulusen, indefinite plural stimuli, definite plural stimuliene)

  1. a stimulus

Related terms

References


Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

Probably from Latin

Noun

stimulus m (definite singular stimulusen, indefinite plural stimuli or stimulusar, definite plural stimuliane or stimulusane)

  1. a stimulus

References


  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

stimulus
 



 



 
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