Rue
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Rue
See also: Rue, rué, rûe, ru'e, rue-, and

English

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From Middle English rewe, reowe, from Old English hr?ow ("sorrow, regret, penitence, repentance, penance"), from Proto-Germanic *hreww? ("pain, sadness, regret, repentance"), from Proto-Indo-European *krew-, *krow-, *krows- ("to push, fall, beat, break"). Cognate with Scots rew ("rue"), West Frisian rouw ("sadness"), Dutch rouw ("mourning, sadness"), German Reue ("repentance, regret, remorse, contrition"), Lithuanian krù?ti ("to smash, crash, bruise"), Russian ? (kru?it?, "crush").

Noun

rue (uncountable)

  1. (archaic or dialectal) Sorrow; repentance; regret.
  2. (archaic or dialectal) Pity; compassion.
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English rewen, ruwen, ruen, reowen, from Old English hr?owan ("to rue; make sorry; grieve"), perhaps influenced by Old Norse hryggja ("to distress, grieve")[1], from Proto-Germanic *hrewwan? ("to sadden; repent"). Cognate with Dutch rouwen, German reuen.

Verb

rue (third-person singular simple present rues, present participle ruing or rueing, simple past and past participle rued)

  1. (obsolete, transitive) To cause to repent of sin or regret some past action.
  2. (obsolete, transitive) To cause to feel sorrow or pity.
  3. (transitive) To repent of or regret (some past action or event); to wish that a past action or event had not taken place.
    I rued the day I crossed paths with her.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Chapman
      I wept to see, and rued it from my heart.
    • 1667, John Milton, Paradise Lost, Book 4:
      Thy will chose freely what it now so justly rues.
    • 2009, David Theo Goldberg, The Threat of Race:
      And feminization of the homeland is something to be rued, while the feminized humiliation of the enemy for the sake of the fatherland is cause for commendation and celebration.
    • 2009, Erica James, It's The Little Things:
      As far as they were concerned, he must be ruing the day he ever met Sally.
    • 2012, Joy Fielding, Still Life:
      And was the fact she was no longer losing large chunks of time something to be celebrated or something to be rued?
    • 2014, Gary Meehan, True Fire:
      "If we get in a fight, you'll be ruing your lack of training."
  4. (archaic, intransitive) To feel compassion or pity.
    • Late 14th century Geoffrey Chaucer, 'The Franklin's Tale', Canterbury Tales
      Madame, reweth upon my peynes smerte
    • (Can we date this quote?) Ridley
      which stirred men's hearts to rue upon them
  5. (archaic, intransitive) To feel sorrow or regret.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Tennyson
      Old year, we'll dearly rue for you.
Usage notes
  • Often used in the collocation "rue the day".
Translations

Etymology 3

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
Rue (plant)

From Middle English rue, from Anglo-Norman ruwe, Old French rue (> modern French rue), from Latin r?ta, from Ancient Greek ? (rhut?). Compare rude.

Noun

rue (plural rues)

  1. Any of various perennial shrubs of the genus Ruta, especially the herb Ruta graveolens (common rue), formerly used in medicines.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, III.2:
      But th'aged Nourse, her calling to her bowre, / Had gathered Rew, and Savine, and the flowre / Of Camphora, and Calamint, and Dill [...].
    • c. 1600, William Shakespeare, Hamlet, Act 4, Scene 5, Ophelia:
      There's fennel for you, and columbines: there's rue for you; and here's some for me: we may call it herb-grace o' Sundays: O you must wear your rue with a difference.
Synonyms
Derived terms
Translations

References

  1. ^ "rue" in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001-2019.

Anagrams


Chuukese

Numeral

rue

  1. twenty

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /?y/
  • (file)

Etymology 1

From Old French rue, developed figuratively from Latin r?ga ("wrinkle"), from Proto-Indo-European *krewp- ("to become encrusted"), extension of *krew- ("scab")

Noun

rue f (plural rues)

  1. street, road

Derived terms

Etymology 2

From Old French rue, rude, from Latin r?ta, from Ancient Greek ? (rhut?).

Noun

rue f (plural rues)

  1. rue (the plant)

Etymology 3

From ruer

Verb

rue

  1. first-person singular present indicative of ruer
  2. third-person singular present indicative of ruer
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of ruer
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of ruer
  5. second-person singular imperative of ruer

Further reading


Kabuverdianu

Verb

rue

  1. gossip

References

  • Gonçalves, Manuel (2015) Capeverdean Creole-English dictionary, ->ISBN

Latin

Verb

rue

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of ru?

Middle English

Alternative forms

Etymology

Borrowed from Anglo-Norman ruwe, from Latin r?ta, from Ancient Greek ? (rhut?).

Pronunciation

Noun

rue

  1. A kind of plant belonging to the genus Ruta; rue.
  2. (rare) meadow-rue (plants in the genus Thalictrum)

Descendants

  • English: rue
  • Scots: rew

References


Norman

Etymology

From Old French rue, developed figuratively from Latin ruga ("wrinkle").

Pronunciation

  • (file)

Noun

rue f (plural rues)

  1. (Jersey, Guernsey) road, street

Norwegian Nynorsk

Alternative forms

Pronunciation

Noun

rue f (definite singular rua, indefinite plural ruer, definite plural ruene)

  1. a pile, heap
  2. a lump of manure, particularly from a cow

Synonyms

Further reading

  • "rue" in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old French

Alternative forms

Etymology

From Latin r?ta, from Ancient Greek ? (rhut?).

Noun

rue f (oblique plural rues, nominative singular rue, nominative plural rues)

  1. rue (plant)

Descendants

  • -> Middle English: rue
  • French: rue

References


Venetian

Noun

rue

  1. plural of rua

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rue
 



 



 
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