Ream
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Ream
See also: Ream and réam

English

English Wikipedia has articles on:
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Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From Middle English reme, rem, from Old English r?am ("cream"), from Proto-Germanic *raumaz ("cream"), from Proto-Indo-European *rewg?mn?- ("to sour [milk]").

Cognate with Dutch room ("cream"), German Rahm ("cream"), Norwegian rømme ("sour cream"), Icelandic rjómi ("cream"). See also ramekin.

Alternative forms

Noun

ream

  1. (Britain dialectal, Northern England, Scotland) Cream; also, the creamlike froth on ale or other liquor; froth or foam in general.

Verb

ream (third-person singular simple present reams, present participle reaming, simple past and past participle reamed)

  1. (Britain dialectal, Northern England, Scotland) To cream; mantle; foam; froth.

Etymology 2

From Middle English remen, rimen, rümen ("to open up"), from Old English r?man ("to make roomy, extend, widen, spread, enlarge, amplify, prolong, clear, open up, make clear by removing obstructions, to clear a way"), from Proto-West Germanic *r?mijan, from Proto-Germanic *r?mijan? ("to make roomy, give room, remove"), from Proto-Indo-European *row- ("free space"). Cognate with Dutch ruimen ("to empty, evacuate"), German räumen ("to make room"), Icelandic rýma ("to make room, clear"). More at room.

Alternative forms

Verb

ream (third-person singular simple present reams, present participle reaming, simple past and past participle reamed)

  1. To enlarge a hole, especially using a reamer; to bore a hole wider.
  2. To shape or form, especially using a reamer.
  3. To remove (material) by reaming.
  4. To remove burrs and debris from a freshly bored hole.
  5. (slang) To yell at or berate.
  6. (slang, vulgar, by extension from sense of enlarging a hole) To sexually penetrate in a rough and painful way.
Synonyms
Translations

Etymology 3

From Middle English reme, from Old French raime, rayme ("ream") (French rame), from Arabic ?(rizma, "bundle").

Alternative forms

Noun

ream (plural reams)

  1. A bundle, package, or quantity of paper, nowadays usually containing 500 sheets.
  2. (chiefly in the plural) An abstract large amount of something.
    I can't go - I still have reams of work left.
Synonyms
Coordinate terms
Translations

See also

Anagrams


Friulian

Etymology

Probably from Latin regimen, regimine. Compare French royaume (Old French reaume, reiame), Occitan reialme, Romansh reginam.

Noun

ream

  1. kingdom

Related terms


Latin

Noun

ream f

  1. accusative singular of rea

Middle English

Noun

ream

  1. Alternative form of rem

Old English

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *raumaz. Cognate with Middle Low German r?m, Middle Dutch room, Old High German roum (German Rahm), Old Norse rjúmi (Icelandic rjómi, Norwegian rømme).

Pronunciation

Noun

r?am m

  1. cream

Descendants

  • English: ream

Scots

Etymology

Late Middle English, from Old English ream ("cream").

Pronunciation

Noun

ream (uncountable)

  1. (food): cream
  2. (ointment): cream

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ream
 



 



 
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