Pech
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Pech
See also: Pech

English

Alternative forms

Etymology

Borrowed from Scots pech, apparently of imitative origin.

Pronunciation

Verb

pech (third-person singular simple present pechs, present participle peching, simple past and past participle peched)

  1. (Scotland, Northern England) To pant, to struggle for breath.
    • 1913, John Buchan, Andrew Jameson, Lord Ardwall, page 136:
      An' as they breisted the lang lang hill / The puir horse graned and peched.
    • 1933, Lewis Grassic Gibbon, Cloud Howe, Polygon 2006 (A Scots Quair), p. 321:
      Then Chris saw Bruce, the porter, come in, with the mark on his jaw where his godfather hit him, then Leslie, the smith, paiching and sweating, he dropped his stick with an awful clatter.
    • 1954, Robin Jenkins, The Thistle and the Grail, 1994, page 225:
      She peched and had to rest often.
    • 1955, Robin Jenkins, The Cone-Gatherers, Canongate 2012, p. 207:
      When Graham reached him, however, he felt so exhausted he could not immediately explain; he had to sit on the ground, peching like a seal.
    • 1994, James Kelman, How Late it Was, How Late:
      If he could just stop breathing and listen but he was peching too much from the climb.

Anagrams


Czech

Etymology

From German Pech.

Noun

pech m

  1. (colloquial) bad luck

Synonyms

Further reading


Dutch

Etymology

From German Pech ("bad luck; pitch, tar"), from Old High German peh, from Latin p?x. Doublet of inherited Dutch pek ("pitch"). Also cognate with English pitch.

The sense "breakdown" is a Dutch innovation. It is probably modelled on the word ongeluk, which means both "bad look, misfortune" and "accident". Since pech typically denotes a lesser kind of bad luck, it came to be used for a lesser kind of traffic accident too. German uses Panne instead; compare Dutch panne.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /p?x/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: pech
  • Rhymes: -?x

Noun

pech m (uncountable)

  1. bad luck; bad karma
  2. breakdown, e.g. of a car

Derived terms


Hungarian

Etymology

From German Pech.[1]

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): ['p?x:]
  • Hyphenation: pech

Noun

pech (plural pechek)

  1. bad luck, misfortune
    Synonym: balszerencse
    Antonyms: szerencse, mázli

Declension

Possessive forms of pech
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. pechem pecheim
2nd person sing. peched pecheid
3rd person sing. peche pechei
1st person plural pechünk pecheink
2nd person plural pechetek pecheitek
3rd person plural pechük pecheik

Derived terms

References

  1. ^ Tótfalusi, István. Idegenszó-tár: Idegen szavak értelmez? és etimológiai szótára ('A Storehouse of Foreign Words: an explanatory and etymological dictionary of foreign words'). Budapest: Tinta Könyvkiadó, 2005. ->ISBN

Polish

Etymology

From German Pech.

Pronunciation

Noun

pech m anim

  1. misfortune ("bad luck")

Declension

Usage notes

  • Rarely used in the plural.

Citations

  • 2002 December 13, Magdalena Grochowalska, "Szczliwa trzynastaka?", in Express Ilustrowany (journalism), Oddzia? Prasa ?ódzka, ISSN 0137-9097:
    Je?li w "normalny" dzie? przewrócimy si? i nic sobie nie zrobimy, to powiemy, ?e mieli?my ogromne szczcie. Je?li przydarzy nam si? to trzynastego, w pi?tek, powiemy, ?e spotka? nas pech. I cho? oficjalnie pani psycholog przekonuje, ?e wszystkie pechy s? wytworem naszej wyobra?ni to jednak.. - Nie mog? zrozumie?, dlaczego w tym dniu przydarzaj? mi si? ró?ne dziwne sytuacje - mówi. - W poprzedni pi?tek, trzynastego zgubi?am portmonetk?, a jeszcze wcze?niej by?a awaria pr?du i ca?y wieczór przesiedzia?am przy ?wieczce.
    (please add an English translation of this quote)

Synonyms

Antonyms

Related terms

Further reading

  • pech in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Scots

Etymology

Imitative.

Pronunciation

Verb

pech (third-person singular present pechs, present participle pechin, past pecht, past participle pecht)

  1. to pant, gasp for breath

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