Nos
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Nos

English

Alternative forms

Noun

nos

  1. plural of no

Anagrams


Asturian

Alternative forms

Etymology 1

From Latin n?s ("we; us").

Pronoun

nos

  1. us (dative and accusative of nosotros/nós)

Etymology 2

From a contraction of the preposition en ("in") + masculine plural article los ("the").

Contraction

nos m pl (masculine sg nel, feminine sg na, neuter sg no, feminine plural nes)

  1. in the

Catalan

Etymology

From Latin n?s ("we; us"), from Proto-Italic *n?s.

Pronoun

nos (enclitic, contracted 'ns, proclitic ens)

  1. us (direct or indirect object)

Declension

Related terms


Cornish

Noun

nos f (plural nosow)

  1. night

Czech

Pronunciation

  • (file)
  • IPA(key): /nos/
  • Rhymes: -os

Etymology 1

From Proto-Slavic *nos?, from Proto-Indo-European *néh?s.

Noun

nos m inan

  1. (anatomy) nose
Declension
Synonyms
Derived terms

Etymology 2

Verb

nos

  1. second-person singular imperative of nosit

Further reading


Fala

Etymology

From Old Portuguese nos, from Latin n?s ("we; us").

Pronoun

nos

  1. we (first person plural nominative personal pronoun; the speakers/writers)
    • 2000, Domingo Frades Gaspar, Vamus a falal: Notas pâ coñocel y platical en nosa fala, Editora regional da Extremadura, Theme IX, Chapter 4: ¿Fala transerrana?:
      I nos, inda hoxii, con autonomía i tó siguimus idendu: "Vo pa Castilla", [...]
      And to this day we, with autonomy and everything, keep on saying: "I'll go to Castille", [...]
  2. us (first person plural objective personal pronoun)
    • 2000, Domingo Frades Gaspar, Vamus a falal: Notas pâ coñocel y platical en nosa fala, Editora regional da Extremadura, Theme II, Chapter 2: Recunquista:
      Non poemos analizar con pormenoris estis siglos, pero tampoco se debi toleral que, sin fundamentus, se poña en duda algo que a Historia documentá nos lega sobre nossa terra.
      We can't thoroughly analyse these centuries, but one mustn't tolerate that, unfoundedly, something documented history tells us about our land be questioned.

French

Etymology

From Old French noz, probably from Latin nostros.

Pronunciation

Determiner

nos pl

  1. plural of notre

Related terms

Possessee
Singular Plural
Masculine Feminine
Possessor Singular First person mon1 ma mes
Second person ton1 ta tes
Third person son1 sa ses
Plural First person notre nos
Second person votre2 vos2
Third person leur leurs
1 Also used before feminine adjectives and nouns beginning with a vowel or mute h.
2 Also used as the polite singular form.

Further reading

Anagrams


Galician

Etymology 1

From contraction of preposition en ("in") + masculine plural article os ("the")

Contraction

nos m pl (masculine sg no, feminine sg na, feminine plural nas)

  1. in the

Etymology 2

From a mutation of os.

Pronoun

nos m (accusative)

  1. Alternative form of os ("them", masculine plural)
Usage notes

The n- forms of accusative third-person pronouns are used when the preceding word ends in -u or a diphthong, and are suffixed to the preceding word.

See also

Etymology 3

See the etymology of the main entry.

Pronoun

nos

  1. inflection of nós:
    1. accusative/dative
    2. reflexive

Guinea-Bissau Creole

Etymology

From Portuguese nós. Cognates with Kabuverdianu anos.

Pronoun

nos

  1. we, first person plural.

Hungarian

Etymology

no (interjection) +‎ s ("and", conjunction)[1]

Pronunciation

Interjection

nos

  1. well

References

  1. ^ Zaicz, Gábor. Etimológiai szótár: Magyar szavak és toldalékok eredete ('Dictionary of Etymology: The origin of Hungarian words and affixes'). Budapest: Tinta Könyvkiadó, 2006, ->ISBN

Interlingua

Pronoun

nos

  1. we
  2. us

Kashubian

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *nos?, from Proto-Indo-European *néh?s.

Noun

nos m

  1. (anatomy) nose

Latin

Etymology

From Proto-Italic *n?s.

Pronunciation

Pronoun

n?s

  1. nominative/accusative plural of ego: we, us

Usage notes

When used in the plural genitive, nostr? is used when it is the object of an action, especially when used with a gerund or gerundive. When used in such a construction, the gerund or gerundive takes on the masculine genitive singular. Nostrum is used as a partitive genitive, used in constructions such as (one of us).

Derived terms

Descendants

See also

Personal pronoun declension.

References

  • nos in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • nos in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • old age creeps on us insensibly: senectus nobis obr?pit
    • vague rumours reach us: dubii rumores afferuntur ad nos
    • we start by presupposing that..: positum est a nobis primum (c. Acc. c. Inf.)
    • we have agreed on this point: hoc conv?nit inter nos
    • tradition, history tells us: memoriae traditum est, memoriae (memoria) proditum est (without nobis)
    • history has handed down to us: historiae prodiderunt (without nobis)
    • we have no expression for that: huic rei deest apud nos vocabulum
    • we are united by many mutual obligations: multa et magna inter nos officia intercedunt (Fam. 13. 65)
    • we have known each other well for several years: vetus usus inter nos intercedit
    • to send out colonists: col?nos mittere (Div. 1. 1. 3)

Lower Sorbian

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *nos?, from Proto-Indo-European *néh?s.

Pronunciation

Noun

nos m (diminutive nosk)

  1. nose

Declension


Middle English

Noun

nos (plural nosses)

  1. Alternative form of nose

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Old Norse n?s, from Proto-Germanic *nas?, from Proto-Indo-European *néh?s.

Noun

nos f or m (definite singular nosa or nosen, indefinite plural noser, definite plural nosene)

  1. (dialectal) nose
  2. (dialectal) steep protruding point on a mountain

Synonyms

References

  • "nos" in The Bokmål Dictionary.
  • "nos" in Det Norske Akademis ordbok (NAOB).

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Old Norse n?s, from Proto-Germanic *nas?, from Proto-Indo-European *néh?s.

Noun

nos f (definite singular nosa, indefinite plural naser, definite plural nasene)

  1. nose
  2. steep protruding point on a mountain

Synonyms

References

  • "nos" in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Occitan

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From Old Occitan [Term?], from Latin n?s.

Pronoun

nos

  1. to us (first-person plural indirect object pronoun)
  2. ourselves (first-person plural reflexive pronoun)

Etymology 2

From Old Occitan nos, nous, nou, from Latin n?dus. Compare Catalan nus, French noeud, Italian nodo.

Noun

nos m (plural noses)

  1. knot

Old French

Alternative forms

  • nous (first-person plural subject pronoun)
  • nus (first-person plural subject pronoun)

Etymology

From Latin n?s.

Pronunciation

Pronoun

nos

  1. we (first-person plural subject pronoun)
  2. our (masculine and feminine plural possessive pronoun)
  3. to us (first-person plural indirect object pronoun)
  4. ourselves (first-person plural reflexive pronoun)

Descendants


Papiamentu

Etymology

From Portuguese nós and Kabuverdianu anos.

Pronoun

nos

  1. we, first person plural.

Polish

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *nos?, from Proto-Indo-European *néh?s.

Pronunciation

Noun

nos m inan (diminutive nosek, augmentative nochal or nosisko)

  1. nose

Declension

Derived terms

Further reading

  • nos in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From Old Portuguese nos, from Latin n?s ("we; us"), from Proto-Italic *n?s.

Pronoun

nos

  1. us; objective case of nós
    Ele dir-nos-ia o nome do indivíduo; Ele nos diria o nome do indivíduo.
    He would have told us the name of the individual.
  2. Obsolete spelling of nós
Quotations

For quotations of use of this term, see Citations:no.

See also
Portuguese personal pronouns ()
Number Person Nominative
(subject)
Accusative
(direct object)
Dative
(indirect object)
Prepositional Prepositional
with com
Non-declining
m f m f m and f m f m f m f
Singular First eu me mim comigo
Second tu te ti contigo você
o senhor a senhora
Third ele ela o
(lo, no)
a
(la, na)
lhe ele ela com ele com ela o mesmo a mesma
se (reflexive) si (reflexive) consigo (reflexive)
Plural First nós nos nós connosco (Portugal)
conosco (Brazil)
a gente
Second vós vos vós convosco vocês
os senhores as senhoras
Third eles elas os
(los, nos)
as
(las, nas)
lhes eles elas com eles com elas os mesmos as mesmas
se (reflexive) si (reflexive) consigo (reflexive)
Indefinite se (reflexive) si (reflexive) consigo (reflexive)

Etymology 2

From Old Portuguese nos, clipping of enos, from en ("in") + os ("the").

Contraction

nos

  1. Contraction of em os ("in the").
    • 2000, J. K. Rowling, Lya Wyler, Harry Potter e o Prisioneiro de Azkaban, Rocco, page 55:
      [...] o gato ronronava feliz nos braços de Hermione.
      [...] the cat was purring happily on Hermione's arms.
Quotations

For quotations of use of this term, see Citations:no.

Etymology 3

Pronoun

nos

  1. Alternative form of os (third-person masculine plural objective pronoun) used as an enclitic following a verb form ending in a nasal vowel or diphthong

Serbo-Croatian

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *nos?, from Proto-Indo-European *néh?s.

Pronunciation

Noun

n?s m (Cyrillic spelling ?)

  1. (anatomy) nose

Declension

Derived terms


Slovene

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *nos?, from Proto-Indo-European *néh?s.

Pronunciation

Noun

ns m inan

  1. (anatomy) nose

Inflection

Masculine inan., hard o-stem, mobile accent, plural in -ôv-
nom. sing. nós
gen. sing. nosú
singular dual plural
nominative nós nosôva nosôvi
accusative nós nosôva nosôve
genitive nosú nosôv nosôv
dative nósu nosôvoma nosôvom
locative nósu nosôvih nosôvih
instrumental nósom nosôvoma nosôvi
Masculine inan., hard o-stem
nom. sing. nós
gen. sing. nósa
singular dual plural
nominative nós nósa nósi
accusative nós nósa nóse
genitive nósa nósov nósov
dative nósu nósoma nósom
locative nósu nósih nósih
instrumental nósom nósoma nósi

Spanish

Etymology

From Latin n?s, from Proto-Italic *n?s.

Pronunciation

Pronoun

nos (object pronoun)

  1. dative of nosotros: to us, for us
  2. accusative of nosotros: us
  3. (reflexive) reflexive of nosotros: ourselves

See also


Swedish

Etymology

From Old Norse n?s, from Proto-Germanic *nas?, from Proto-Indo-European *néh?s-.

Noun

nos c

  1. a nose of an animal

Declension

Declension of nos 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative nos nosen nosar nosarna
Genitive nos nosens nosars nosarnas

Related terms


Walloon

Etymology

From Old French nos, from Latin nos.

Pronoun

nos

  1. we

Related terms


Welsh

Etymology

From Middle Welsh nos, probably borrowed from Latin nox, from Proto-Indo-European *nók?ts.

Pronunciation

Noun

nos f (plural nosweithiau, or rarely nosau)

  1. night

Derived terms

Terms derived from nos

Mutation

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
nos unchanged unchanged unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Western Apache

Pronunciation

Noun

nos

  1. manzanita plant

Usage notes

  • occurs only in Dilzhe'eh (Tonto) dialect

See also


  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

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