Morum
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Morum

Latin

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From Ancient Greek (móron)

Noun

m?rum n (genitive m?r?); second declension

  1. mulberry (fruit)
  2. blackberry
Declension

Second-declension noun (neuter).

Synonyms
Descendants
  • English: morula
  • French: mûre
  • Galician: amora
  • Italian: mora

References

  • morum in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • morum in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • morum in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • (ambiguous) the earth brings forth fruit, crops: terra effert (more rarely fert, but not profert) fruges
    • (ambiguous) Vesuvius is discharging flame: Vesuvius evomit (more strongly eructat) ignes
    • (ambiguous) to make an impression on the senses: sensus movere (more strongly pellere)
    • (ambiguous) to die at a good old age: exacta aetate mori
    • (ambiguous) to starve oneself to death: inedi? mori or vitam finire
    • (ambiguous) to make a person laugh: risum elicere (more strongly excutere) alicui
    • (ambiguous) to die a natural death: necessaria (opp. voluntaria) morte mori
    • (ambiguous) to court a person's favour; to ingratiate oneself with..: gratiam alicuius sibi quaerere, sequi, more strongly aucupari
    • (ambiguous) to refuse, reject a request: negare, more strongly denegare alicui aliquid
    • (ambiguous) to form a plan, make a resolution: consilium capere, inire (de aliqua re, with Gen. gerund., with Inf., more rarely ut)
    • (ambiguous) to detain a person: in mora alicui esse
    • (ambiguous) without delay: sine mora or nulla mora interposita
    • (ambiguous) a lifelike picture of everyday life: morum ac vitae imitatio
    • (ambiguous) to inspire fear, terror: timorem, terrorem alicui inicere, more strongly incutere
    • (ambiguous) to be cast down, discouraged, in despair: animo esse humili, demisso (more strongly animo esse fracto, perculso et abiecto) (Att. 3. 2)
    • (ambiguous) to disconcert a person: animum alicuius de statu, de gradu demovere (more strongly depellere, deturbare)
    • (ambiguous) to long for a thing, yearn for it: desiderio alicuius rei teneri, affici (more strongly flagrare, incensum esse)
    • (ambiguous) to make sport of, rally a person: illudere alicui or in aliquem (more rarely aliquem)
    • (ambiguous) to give moral advice, rules of conduct: morum praecepta tradere alicui
    • (ambiguous) a stern critic of morals: severus morum castigator
    • (ambiguous) it is customary to..: mos (moris) est, ut (Brut. 21. 84)
    • (ambiguous) it is traditional usage: more, usu receptum est
    • (ambiguous) according to the custom and tradition of my fathers: more institutoque maiorum (Mur. 1. 1)
    • (ambiguous) to pass the whole day in discussion: dicendi mora diem extrahere, eximere, tollere
    • (ambiguous) to die of wounds: ex vulnere mori (Fam. 10. 33)

Etymology 2

Noun

m?rum

  1. genitive plural of m?s

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morum
 



 



 
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