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More
See also: More, moré, môre, mo?e, møre, and -more

English

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From Middle English more, from Old English m?ra ("more"), from Proto-Germanic *maizô ("more"), from Proto-Indo-European *m?- ("many"). Cognate with Scots mair ("more"), Saterland Frisian moor ("more"), West Frisian mear ("more"), Dutch meer ("more"), Low German mehr ("more"), German mehr ("more"), Danish mere ("more"), Swedish mera ("more"), Norwegian Bokmål mer ("more"), Norwegian Nynorsk meir ("more"), Icelandic meiri, meira ("more").

Alternative forms

  • (informal or nonstandard) mo, mo'
  • (Internet slang) moar

Determiner

more

  1. comparative degree of many: in greater number. (Used for a discrete quantity.)
    More people are arriving.
    There are more ways to do this than I can count.
    • 2014 June 14, "It's a gas", in The Economist, volume 411, number 8891:
      One of the hidden glories of Victorian engineering is proper drains. Isolating a city's effluent and shipping it away in underground sewers has probably saved more lives than any medical procedure except vaccination.
  2. comparative degree of much: in greater quantity, amount, or proportion. (Used for a continuous quantity.)
    I want more soup;  I need more time
    There's more caffeine in my coffee than in the coffee you get in most places.
    • 2013 June 29, "A punch in the gut", in The Economist, volume 407, number 8842, page 72-3:
      Mostly, the microbiome is beneficial. It helps with digestion and enables people to extract a lot more calories from their food than would otherwise be possible. Research over the past few years, however, has implicated it in diseases from atherosclerosis to asthma to autism.
Antonyms
Derived terms
Translations

Adverb

more (not comparable)

  1. To a greater degree or extent. [from 10thc.]
    He walks more in the morning these days.
    • 2013 July 19, Ian Sample, "Irregular bedtimes may affect children's brains", in The Guardian Weekly, volume 189, number 6, page 34:
      Irregular bedtimes may disrupt healthy brain development in young children, according to a study of intelligence and sleeping habits.  ¶ Going to bed at a different time each night affected girls more than boys, but both fared worse on mental tasks than children who had a set bedtime, researchers found.
  2. (now poetic) In negative constructions: any further, any longer; any more. [from 10thc.]
  3. Used alone to form the comparative form of adjectives and adverbs. [from 13thc.]
    You're more beautiful than I ever imagined.
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 5, in The Celebrity:
      Then we relapsed into a discomfited silence, and wished we were anywhere else. But Miss Thorn relieved the situation by laughing aloud, and with such a hearty enjoyment that instead of getting angry and more mortified we began to laugh ourselves, and instantly felt better.
    • 2013 July-August, Henry Petroski, "Geothermal Energy", in American Scientist, volume 101, number 4:
      Ancient nomads, wishing to ward off the evening chill and enjoy a meal around a campfire, had to collect wood and then spend time and effort coaxing the heat of friction out from between sticks to kindle a flame. With more settled people, animals were harnessed to capstans or caged in treadmills to turn grist into meal.
  4. (now dialectal, humorous or proscribed) Used in addition to an inflected comparative form. [from 13thc.; standard until 18thc.]
    I was more better at English than you.
Derived terms
Translations
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Pronoun

more

  1. A greater number of people or things.

Noun

more (uncountable)

  1. An extra amount or extent.
Derived terms
Terms derived from more (noun)

See also

Etymology 2

From Middle English more, moore ("carrot, parsnip") from Old English more, moru ("carrot, parsnip") from Proto-Germanic *murh? ("carrot"), from Proto-Indo-European *mork- ("edible herb, tuber"). Akin to Old Saxon moraha ("carrot"), Old High German morha, moraha ("root of a plant or tree") (German Möhre ("carrot"), Morchel ("mushroom, morel")). More at morel.

Noun

more (plural mores)

  1. (obsolete) A carrot; a parsnip.
  2. (dialectal) A root; stock.
  3. A plant.

Etymology 3

From Middle English moren, from the noun. See above.

Verb

more (third-person singular simple present mores, present participle moring, simple past and past participle mored)

  1. (transitive) To root up.

Anagrams


Afrikaans

Adverb

more

  1. Alternative form of môre

Albanian

Alternative forms

Etymology

According to Orel from the aoristic form of marr without a clear sense development. It could also be a remnant of a grammatical structure of a lost substrate language. It is the source of same interjection found in all Balkan languages.[1]

Interjection

more

  1. vocative particle used in a call to a man.

Usage notes

Can be placed before or after the noun, whereas bre can only be placed after.

Related terms

References

  1. ^ Albanische Etymologien (Untersuchungen zum albanischen Erbwortschatz), Bardhyl Demiraj, Leiden Studies in Indo-European 7; Amsterdam - Atlanta 1997

Basque

Noun

more

  1. purple

See also

Colors in Basque · koloreak (layout · text)
     zuri      gris      beltz
             gorri              laranja; marroi              hori
                          berde             
                          oztin              urdin
             ubel              more              arrosa

Czech

Pronunciation

Noun

more

  1. vocative singular of mor

Danish

Etymology

Derived from moro ("fun"), which may be a compound of mod, from Old Norse móðr ("mind") and ro, from ("rest").

Verb

more (imperative mor, infinitive at more, present tense morer, past tense morede, perfect tense har moret)

  1. To amuse, entertain

Derived terms


Dutch

Etymology

From Latin mora.

Pronunciation

Noun

more m or f (plural moren, diminutive moretje n)

  1. The unit of length (short or long) in poetic metre

Anagrams


French

Pronunciation

Noun

more f (plural mores)

  1. (phonology) mora

Adjective

more (plural mores)

  1. (dated) Alternative spelling of maure

Related terms

Anagrams

External links


Italian

Noun

more f

  1. plural of mora

Verb

more

  1. (slang) third-person singular indicative present of morire

Synonyms

Anagrams


Latin

Noun

m?re

  1. ablative singular of m?s

References


Latvian

Noun

more f (5 declension, masculine form: moris)

  1. (archaic) black woman, blackamoor, black moor

Declension


Maori

Noun

more

  1. taproot

Synonyms


Norwegian Bokmål

Verb

more (present tense morer, past tense mora or moret, past participle mora or moret)

  1. amuse, entertain

Old English

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *murh?(n), *murhij?(n) ("carrot"), from Proto-Indo-European *mork- ("edible herb, tuber"). Akin to Old Saxon moraha ("carrot"), Old High German morha, moraha "root of a plant or tree" (German Möhre ("carrot"), Morchel ("mushroom, morel")). More at more, morel.

Pronunciation

Noun

more f

  1. carrot
  2. parsnip

Declension

Synonyms

Descendants


Portuguese

Pronunciation

Verb

more

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of morar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of morar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of morar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of morar

Serbo-Croatian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /mô:re/
  • Hyphenation: mo?re

Etymology 1

From Proto-Slavic *mo?e, from Proto-Indo-European *móri.

Noun

m?re n (Cyrillic spelling )

  1. sea
  2. (by extension, preceded by preposition na) seaside or shore (any area or place near the sea where the sea is seen as the defining feature)
    ?im do?e ljeto, idemo na more! - Once the summer is here, we're gonna go to the seaside!
    Cijelo ljeto ?u provest na moru. - I will spend the entire summer at the shore.
  3. (figuratively) a vast expanse or quantity of something, usually detrimental or unwelcome
    Ako se ne pozabavimo time sada, bit ?emo u moru nevolja!
    If we do not deal with that now, we will be in a sea of troubles!
Declension

Synonyms
Derived terms

See also

Etymology 2

From Greek ? (moré).

Interjection

m?re (Cyrillic spelling )

  1. (Serbia) when spoken sharply, asserts that the speaker is stronger or older or more powerful than the addressee, sometimes expressing contempt or superiority
    • 1824, recorded by Vuk Stefanovi? Karad?i?, Narodne srpske pjesme:
       »More, Marko, ne ori drumova!« / »More, Turci, ne gaz'te oranja!«
       »More, Marko, don't plow up our roads!« / »More, Turks, don't walk on my plowing!«
  2. (Serbia) when not spoken sharply, functions as a term of endearment or generic intensifier, cf. bre

Usage notes

More is most often used in addressing a single male, more rarely when addressing groups of males, and more rarely still when addressing females.

Related terms

References

  • Tomislav Mareti?, editor (1911-1916), "m?re 1", in Rje?nik hrvatskoga ili srpskoga jezika (in Serbo-Croatian), volume 7, Zagreb: JAZU, page 4

Noun

more (Cyrillic spelling ?)

  1. inflection of mora:
    1. genitive singular
    2. nominative/accusative/vocative plural

Slovak

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *mo?e, from Proto-Indo-European *móri.

Pronunciation

Noun

more n (genitive singular mora, nominative plural moria, genitive plural morí, declension pattern of srdce)

  1. A body of salt water, sea.
  2. (colloquial) A huge amount, a plenty (+genitive)
    máme more ?asuwe have plenty of time

Declension

Derived terms

External links

  • more in Slovak dictionaries at korpus.sk

Spanish

Pronunciation

Verb

more

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of morar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of morar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of morar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of morar.

Welsh

Pronunciation

Noun

more

  1. Nasal mutation of bore ("morning").

Mutation

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
bore fore more unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

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