Manes
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Manes

English

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Wikipedia

Etymology 1

From Latin manes ("spirits of the dead").

Pronunciation

  • enPR: mä?n?z, IPA(key): /'m?:ne?z/
    • (file)

Noun

manes pl (plural only)

  1. The souls or spirits of dead ancestors, conceived as deities or the subjects of reverence, or of other deceased relatives.
    • 1658, Sir Thomas Browne, Urne-Burial, Penguin 2005, p. 9
      this was the Ustrina or place of burning their bodies, or some sacrificing place unto the Manes
    • 1819, Felicia Hemans, The Wife of Asdrubal, Tales and Historic Scenes, p. 171
      Still may the manès of thy children rise
      To chase calm slumber from thy wearied eyes;
      Still may their voices on the haunted air
      In fearful whispers tell thee to despair,
Related terms
Translations

Etymology 2

Pronunciation

Noun

manes

  1. plural of mane

Anagrams


Catalan

Verb

manes

  1. second-person singular present indicative form of manar

Latin

Etymology 1

Literally "the good ones", substantive use of the masculine plural of m?nis ("good").

Pronunciation

Noun

m?n?s m pl (genitive m?nium); third declension

  1. the spirits of dead ancestors; deified shades
  2. a corpse
  3. ashes; remains
  4. the netherworld
Declension

Third-declension noun (i-stem), plural only.

Descendants

  • English: manes
  • German: Manen pl

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the main entry.

Pronunciation

Adjective

m?n?s

  1. nominative/accusative/vocative masculine/feminine singular of m?nis

Etymology 3

See the etymology of the main entry.

Pronunciation

Verb

man?s

  1. second-person singular present active indicative of mane?

References

  • manes in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • manes in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • (ambiguous) to have something in one's hands, on hand: in manibus habere aliquid (also metaphorically)
    • (ambiguous) to wrest from a person's hand: ex or de manibus alicui or alicuius extorquere aliquid
    • (ambiguous) to let go from one's hands: e manibus dimittere
    • (ambiguous) to carry in one's arms: in manibus aliquem gestare
    • (ambiguous) to slip, escape from the hands: e (de) manibus effugere, el?bi
    • (ambiguous) to sit with folded arms; to be inactive: compressis manibus sedere (proverb.) (Liv. 7. 13)
    • (ambiguous) to have success in one's grasp: fortunam in manibus habere
    • (ambiguous) to let success slip through one's fingers: fortunam ex manibus dimittere
    • (ambiguous) to be engaged on a book: liber mihi est in manibus
    • (ambiguous) to be engaged on a book: librum in manibus habere (Acad. 1. 1. 2)
    • (ambiguous) the book, speech can easily be obtained: liber, oratio in manibus est
    • (ambiguous) to lay down a book (vid. sect. XII. 3, note vestem deponere...): librum de manibus ponere
    • (ambiguous) to appease the manes, make sacrifice for departed souls: manes expiare (Pis. 7. 16)
    • (ambiguous) to wrest weapons from some one's hands: extorquere arma e manibus
    • (ambiguous) to not let the enemy escape: hostem e manibus non dimittere
    • (ambiguous) to escape from the hands of the enemy: effugere, el?bi e manibus hostium
    • (ambiguous) to let the enemy escape: dimittere e manibus hostes
    • (ambiguous) to rescue some one from the hands of the enemy: eripere aliquem e manibus hostium
  • manes in The Perseus Project (1999) Perseus Encyclopedia[2]
  • manes in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • manes in William Smith, editor (1848) A Dictionary of Greek Biography and Mythology, London: John Murray
  • manes in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin

Middle English

Noun

manes

  1. plural of mane

Portuguese

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin manes.

Noun

manes m pl (plural only)

  1. (Roman mythology) manes (spirits of the dead)

Spanish

Pronunciation

Verb

manes

  1. Informal second-person singular () present subjunctive form of manar.

Volapük

Noun

manes

  1. dative plural of man

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