Locution
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Locution

English

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Wikipedia

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin loc?ti?, loc?ti?nem ("speech"), from loquor ("speak"). Compare the French cognate locution.

Pronunciation

Noun

locution (plural locutions)

  1. A phrase or expression connected to an individual or a group of individuals through repeated usage.
    The television show host is widely recognized for his all-too-common locutions.
    • 1996, David Foster Wallace, Infinite Jest:
      Another way fathers impact sons is that sons, one their voices have changed in puberty, invariably answer the telephone with the same locutions and intonations of their fathers.
  2. The use of a word or phrase in an unusual or specialized way.
    • 1992, Judith Jarvis Thomson, The Realm of Rights (page 299)
      So it cannot be supposed that promisings differ from other word-givings in that a word-giver makes a promise only if he or she uses the locution "I promise".
  3. (religion) A supernatural revelation where a religious figure, statue or icon speaks, usually to a saint.

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

References


French

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin loc?ti?, loc?ti?nem ("speech"), from loqui ("speak").

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /l?.ky.sj/
  • (file)

Noun

locution f (plural locutions)

  1. phrase, locution

Derived terms

Further reading


  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

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