Lingua
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Lingua
See also: língua

English

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster's Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for lingua in
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin lingua ("tongue"). Doublet of tongue.

Pronunciation

Noun

lingua (plural linguae or linguas)

  1. tongue
  2. (zoology) A median process of the labium, at the underside of the mouth in insects, and serving as a tongue.

Anagrams


Galician

Etymology

From Latin lingua, from Old Latin dingua, from Proto-Italic *den?w?, from Proto-Indo-European *dnwéh?s.

Noun

lingua f (plural linguas)

  1. tongue
    botar a lingua a pacer (idiom)
    to ramble; to be indiscreet
    (literally, "to put the tongue to graze")
  2. language

Guinea-Bissau Creole

Etymology

From Portuguese língua. Cognates with Kabuverdianu lingua.

Noun

lingua

  1. tongue
  2. language

Interlingua

Interlingua Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia ia

Pronunciation

Noun

lingua (plural linguas)

  1. tongue
  2. language

Synonyms

Related terms


Italian

Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia it

Etymology

From Latin lingua, from Old Latin dingua, from Proto-Italic *den?w?, from Proto-Indo-European *dnwéh?s.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): ['li?.?wa]
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: lìn?gua

Noun

lingua f (plural lingue)

  1. tongue
  2. language, tongue
  3. strip, tongue (of land)
  4. (in the plural) foreign languages
  5. the square horn of an anvil
  6. (especially in plural) A type of Italian flatbread

Related terms

Descendants

  • -> Greek: (lígka)

Anagrams


Kabuverdianu

Etymology

From Portuguese língua.

Noun

lingua

  1. tongue
  2. language

Ladino

Alternative forms

Etymology

From Latin lingua, from Old Latin *dingua, from Proto-Italic *den?w?, from Proto-Indo-European *dnwéh?s.

Noun

lingua f (Latin spelling, Hebrew spelling ‎, plural linguas)

  1. tongue
  2. (linguistics) language

Synonyms


Latin

Alternative forms

Etymology

From Old Latin *dingua, from Proto-Italic *den?w?, from Proto-Indo-European *dnwéh?s. The change of d- to l- is likely by association with the verb ling? ("lick").

Pronunciation

Noun

lingua f (genitive linguae); first declension

  1. tongue
  2. A speech
  3. An utterance or expression
  4. A language
  5. A dialect, idiom or mode of speech
  6. (poetic, of animals) voice, note, song, bark etc.
  7. A kind of plant (alternatively called lingul?ca)
  8. The reed of the Roman tibiae
  9. A small amount of something, e.g. "a tongue of land" or "a spoonful"
  10. The short arm of a lever

Declension

First-declension noun.

Derived terms

Descendants

References

  • lingua in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • lingua in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • lingua in Charles du Fresne du Cange's Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883-1887)
  • lingua in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to have a ready tongue: lingua promptum esse
    • volubility: linguae solutio
    • the Greek language is a richer one than the Latin: lingua graeca latin? locupletior (copiosior, uberior) est
    • intercourse of speech: commercium linguae
    • volubility: volubilitas, solutio linguae
    • to be united by having a common language: eiusdem linguae societate coniunctum esse cum aliquo (De Or. 3. 59. 223)
    • to speak the Greek language: graece or graeca lingua loqui
    • to know Latin: latinam linguam scire or didicisse
    • to introduce a new word into the Latin language: inducere novum verbum in latinam linguam
    • maintain a devout silence (properly, utter no ill-omened word): favete ore, linguis =

Romansch

Etymology

From Latin lingua ("tongue, speech, language"), from Old Latin dingua, from Proto-Italic *den?w?, from Proto-Indo-European *dnwéh?s ("tongue, speech, language").

Noun

lingua f (plural linguas)

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun, Puter, Vallader) language

Synonyms


Sicilian

Etymology

From Latin lingua ("tongue, language"), from Old Latin dingua, from Proto-Italic *den?w?, from Proto-Indo-European *dnwéh?s.

Noun

lingua f (plural lingui)

  1. tongue
  2. language

  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

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