Knoll
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Knoll
See also: Knoll

English

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From Old English cnoll ("summit"). Related to Old Norse knollr (found only in names of places), Dutch knol ("tuber"), Swedish knöl ("tuber"), Danish knold ("hillock, clod, tuber") and German Knolle ("bulb").

Noun

knoll (plural knolls)

  1. A small mound or rounded hill.
    • Sir Walter Scott
      On knoll or hillock rears his crest, / Lonely and huge, the giant oak.
Translations

Etymology 2

Imitative, or variant of knell.

Noun

knoll (plural knolls)

  1. A knell.

Verb

knoll (third-person singular simple present knolls, present participle knolling, simple past and past participle knolled)

  1. (transitive) To ring (a bell) mournfully; to knell.
  2. (intransitive, transitive) To sound, like a bell; to knell.
    • Shakespeare, "As you like it", Act II, scene VII, 114
      If ever been where bells have knoll´d to church.
    • Byron
      For a departed being's soul / The death hymn peals, and the hollow bells knoll.
    • Tennyson
      Heavy clocks knolling the drowsy hours.

Etymology 3

Named after Knoll, a furniture fabrication shop, famous for its angular range of designer furniture.

Verb

knoll (third-person singular simple present knolls, present participle knolling, simple past and past participle knolled)

  1. To arrange related objects in parallel or at 90 degree angles.

Westrobothnian

Verb

knoll (preterite knollä)

  1. (transitive) roll together: make curly

Related terms


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