Ile
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Ile
See also: Ile, île, %ile, and -ile

English

Etymology 1

From Middle English eile, eyle, ei?le, from Old English e?l ("an ail; awn; beard of barley; mote"), from Proto-Germanic *agil? ("awn"). Cognate with German Egel, Achel.

Alternative forms

Noun

ile

  1. (obsolete) An ear of corn.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Ainsworth to this entry?)

Etymology 2

Noun

ile (plural iles)

  1. Obsolete form of aisle.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of H. Swinburne to this entry?)

Etymology 3

Noun

ile (plural iles)

  1. Obsolete form of isle.
    • John Milton
      or spread his aerie flight / Upborn with indefatigable wings / Over the vast abrupt, ere he arrive / The happy Ile

Anagrams


Basque

Noun

ile

  1. hair

Derived terms


Danish

Pronunciation

Verb

ile (imperative il, infinitive at ile, present tense iler, past tense ilede, perfect tense har ilet)

  1. hurry, hasten

French

Pronunciation

  • (file)

Noun

ile f (plural iles)

  1. Alternative spelling of île

Further reading


Latin

Etymology

Most likely from Ancient Greek (eileós, "colic"), from (eilé?, "I throng, press"), from Proto-Indo-European *wel- ("to turn, wind, round"), same source as with Old Armenian (gelum).

Pronunciation

Noun

?le n (genitive ?lis); third declension

  1. (anatomy) intestines, guts

Declension

Third-declension noun (neuter, "pure" i-stem).

Derived terms

Descendants

References

  • ile in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • ile in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • ile in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • ile in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • ile in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin

Old English

Noun

ile m

  1. the sole of the foot

Declension


Polish

Pronunciation

Pronoun

ile

  1. how much, how many
    Ile to kosztuje?
    How much is it?
    Ile masz lat?
    How old are you?
    (literally, "How many years do you have?")
  2. (colloquial) how long
    Ile jeszcze b?d? ?y
    How long will I still live?
    Ile trwa cia?
    How long does pregnancy last?

Declension

Derived terms

Related terms

Further reading

  • ile in Wielki s?ownik j?zyka polskiego, Instytut J?zyka Polskiego PAN
  • ile in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Swahili

Adjective

ile

  1. Mi class inflected form of -le.
  2. N class inflected form of -le (singular only).

Turkish

Postposition

ile

  1. with
    Arkadamla dar? ç?k?yorum. - I am going out with my friend.
    Müsadenizle. - With your permission.

Conjunction

ile

  1. and (joining two noun phrases)
    Ate?le barut yan yana durmaz. - Fire and gunpowder, side by side, do not last.

Usage notes

These usage notes apply equally to the use of ile as a postposition and as a conjunction.

The term can be used as a stand-alone word, but usually takes the form of an enclitic, that is, it is suffixed to the preceding word as -la / -yla or -le / -yle. Which form is used depends on the affixed word's dominant vowel, and whether the word ends in a vowel or a consonant.

An apostrophe is required when suffixed to a proper noun:

  • ?ebnem'le
  • Ali'yle
  • Bar'la
  • Beyza'yla

Generally, the stress in a Turkish word goes to the last syllable, but, when used as an enclitic, (y)le / (y)la is unstressed and leaves the stress of the preceding word to which it is suffixed unchanged.

In a curious exception to vowel harmony, the suffix -yla raises a preceding back vowel ? to a front vowel i. For example, the word dolay?s?yla ("consequently", "therefore") is pronounced /dolaj?'sijla/.

The dual role of the term can occasionally result in an ambiguity. The saying bir ta?la iki ku? vurmak, literally "to hit two birds with one stone", can (theoretically) also mean "to hit one stone and two birds".


  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

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