House
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House
See also: House

English

Etymology 1

From Middle English hous, hus, from Old English h?s ("dwelling, shelter, house"), from Proto-Germanic *h?s? (compare Scots hoose, West Frisian hûs, Dutch huis, Low German Huus, German Haus, Danish hus, Norwegian Bokmål hus and Swedish hus), possibly from Proto-Indo-European *(s)kews-, from *(s)kew- ("to cover, hide"). Compare also Northern Luri (hö?, "house, home"). Eclipsed non-native Middle English meson, measoun ("house"), borrowed from Old French maison ("house"). More at hose.

The uncommon plural form housen is from Middle English husen, housen.

Alternative forms

Pronunciation

Noun

The house of a Japanese rice farmer
A city-house. In this photo, its garden doesn't appear

house (countable and uncountable, plural houses or (dialectal) housen or (chiefly humorous) hice)

  1. A structure built or serving as an abode of human beings. [from 9th c.]
    This is my house and my family's ancestral home.
    • 1909, Archibald Marshall [pseudonym; Arthur Hammond Marshall], chapter III, in The Squire's Daughter, New York, N.Y.: Dodd, Mead and Company, published 1919, OCLC 491297620:
      The big houses, and there are a good many of them, lie for the most part in what may be called by courtesy the valleys. You catch a glimpse of them sometimes at a little distance from the [railway] line, which seems to have shown some ingenuity in avoiding them, [...].
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 1, in Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      Pretty soon I struck into a sort of path  [...]. It twisted and turned, [...] and opened out into a big clear space like a lawn. And, back of the lawn, was a big, old-fashioned house, with piazzas stretching in front of it, and all blazing with lights. 'Twas the house I'd seen the roof of from the beach.
    • 2007 November 6, "When Will the Slump End?", in Newsweek:
      Those homeowners who bought too much house, or borrowed against inflated values are now going to be liable for their own poor decisions.
  2. The people who live in a house; a household. [from 9th c.]
    • Bible, Acts 10:2
      one that feared God with all his house
  3. A building used for something other than a residence (typically with qualifying word). [from 10th c.]
    The former carriage house had been made over into a guest house.
    On arriving at the zoo, we immediately headed for the monkey house.
    1. A place of business; a company or organisation, especially a printing press, a publishing company, or a couturier. [from 10th c.]
      A small publishing house would have a contract with an independent fulfillment house.
    2. A place of public accommodation or entertainment, especially a public house, an inn, a restaurant, a theatre, or a casino; or the management thereof.[from 10th c.]
      One more, sir, then I'll have to stop serving you - rules of the house, I'm afraid.
      The house always wins.
    3. (historical) A workhouse.
      • 1834, Great Britain. Parliament. House of Commons, Reports from the Commissioners (volume 29, page 169)
        To this the pauper replied that he did not want that, and that rather than be sent to the house he would look out for work.
  4. The audience for a live theatrical or similar performance. [from 10th c.]
    • 1905, Baroness Emmuska Orczy, chapter 2, in The Affair at the Novelty Theatre[1]:
      Miss Phyllis Morgan, as the hapless heroine dressed in the shabbiest of clothes, appears in the midst of a gay and giddy throng; she apostrophises all and sundry there, including the villain, and has a magnificent scene which always brings down the house, and nightly adds to her histrionic laurels.
  5. A theatre.
    After her swan-song, there wasn't a dry eye in the house.
  6. (politics) A building where a deliberative assembly meets; whence the assembly itself, particularly a component of a legislature. [from 10th c.]
    The petition was so ridiculous that the house rejected it after minimal debate.
  7. A dynasty; a family with its ancestors and descendants, especially a royal or noble one. [from 10th c.]
    A curse lay upon the House of Atreus.
  8. (figurative) A place of rest or repose. [from 9th c.]
  9. A grouping of schoolchildren for the purposes of competition in sports and other activities. [from 19th c.]
    I was a member of Spenser house when I was at school.
  10. An animal's shelter or den, or the shell of an animal such as a snail, used for protection. [from 10th c.]
  11. (astrology) One of the twelve divisions of an astrological chart. [from 14th c.]
    • 1971, Keith Thomas, Religion and the Decline of Magic, Folio Society 2012, p.313:
      Since there was a limited number of planets, houses and signs of the zodiac, the astrologers tended to reduce human potentialities to a set of fixed types and to postulate only a limited number of possible variations.
  12. (cartomancy) The fourth Lenormand card.
  13. (chess, now rare) A square on a chessboard, regarded as the proper place of a piece. [from 16th c.]
  14. (curling) The four concentric circles where points are scored on the ice. [from 19th c.]
  15. Lotto; bingo. [from 20th c.]
  16. (uncountable) A children's game in which the players pretend to be members of a household.
    As the babysitter, Emma always acted as the mother whenever the kids demanded to play house.
  17. (US, dialect) A small stand of trees in a swamp.
  18. (sudoku) A set of cells in a Sudoku puzzle which must contain each digit exactly once, such as a row, column, or 3×3 box in classic Sudoku.
Synonyms
  • (establishment): shop
  • (company or organisation): shop
Hypernyms
Hyponyms
Derived terms
Descendants
  • Nigerian Pidgin: haus
  • Tok Pisin: haus
  • Sranan Tongo: oso
Translations

See house/translations § Noun.

Further reading

Etymology 2

From Middle English housen, from Old English h?sian, from Proto-Germanic *h?s?n? ("to house, live, dwell"), from the noun (see above). Compare Dutch huizen ("to live, dwell, reside"), German Low German husen ("to live, dwell, reside"), German hausen ("to live, dwell, reside"), Norwegian Nynorsk husa ("to house"), Faroese húsa ("to house"), Icelandic húsa ("to shelter, house").

Pronunciation

Verb

house (third-person singular simple present houses, present participle housing, simple past and past participle housed)

  1. (transitive) To keep within a structure or container.
    The car is housed in the garage.
  2. (transitive) To admit to residence; to harbor/harbour.
  3. To take shelter or lodging; to abide; to lodge.
  4. (transitive, astrology) To dwell within one of the twelve astrological houses.
  5. (transitive) To contain or cover mechanical parts.
  6. (obsolete) To drive to a shelter.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?)
  7. (obsolete) To deposit and cover, as in the grave.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Sandys to this entry?)
  8. (nautical) To stow in a safe place; to take down and make safe.
    to house the upper spars
  9. (Canada, US, slang, transitive) To eat.
    • 2019, Joe Lawson, Shameless (series 10, episode 4, "A Little Gallagher Goes a Long Way")
      All you wanna do is drink a fifth, house a lasagna, and hide in a dumpster until that baby stops crying.
Synonyms
Translations

Etymology 3

Probably from The Warehouse, a nightclub in Chicago, Illinois, USA, where the music became popular around 1985.

Noun

house (uncountable)

  1. (music) House music.
    • 1998, Colin Larkin, The Virgin Encyclopedia of Dance Music, London: Virgin Books, ->ISBN, page 73:
      [...] their music is influenced as much by Roxy Music and the Ramones as it is by house and techno pioneers.
    • 2001 March, Philip Sherburne, "Exos, Strength [album review]", in CMJ New Music Monthly, number 91, Great Neck, N.Y.: College Media, ISSN 1074-6978, page 66:
      And while hard, minimal techno has become increasingly influenced by house and Oval-esque "glitch" stylistics, Exos keeps it old school on Strength, infusing his own style with the force of hard techno purists Surgeon and Oliver Ho.
    • 2006, Mark Jonathan Butler, Unlocking the Groove: Rhythm, Meter, and Musical Design in Electronic Dance Music, Bloomington, Ind.: Indiana University Press, ->ISBN, page 45:
      The first genre of American dance music to become popular in the United Kingdom was Chicago house. Although music from Detroit was soon imported as well, it was often treated as subcategory of house, and for many years the most common English term for electronic dance music in general was "house" or "acid house". [...] During the formative years of techno and house, the musicians involved interacted in various ways.
Translations

Czech

Pronunciation

Noun

house n

  1. gosling

Declension

Further reading


Dutch

Pronunciation

Noun

house m (uncountable)

  1. house music, house

Finnish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /'h?u?s/, ['h?u?s?]
  • Syllabification: hou?se

Noun

house (uncountable)

  1. (music) house music, house

Declension

Inflection of house (Kotus type 8/nalle, no gradation)
nominative house
genitive housen
partitive housea
illative houseen
singular plural
nominative house
accusative nom. house
gen. housen
genitive housen
partitive housea
inessive housessa
elative housesta
illative houseen
adessive housella
ablative houselta
allative houselle
essive housena
translative houseksi
instructive
abessive housetta
comitative
Possessive forms of house (type nalle)
possessor singular plural
1st person houseni housemme
2nd person housesi housenne
3rd person housensa

French

Pronunciation

Noun

house f (uncountable)

  1. house music, house (genre of music)

Synonyms

Anagrams


Hungarian

Etymology

From English house.

Pronunciation

Noun

house (plural house-ok)

  1. (music) house, house music (type of electronic dance music with an uptempo beat and recurring kickdrum)

Declension

Possessive forms of house
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. house-om house-aim
2nd person sing. house-od house-aid
3rd person sing. house-a house-ai
1st person plural house-unk house-aink
2nd person plural house-otok house-aitok
3rd person plural house-uk house-aik

Derived terms

References

  1. ^ Laczkó, Krisztina and Attila Mártonfi. Helyesírás ('Orthography'). Budapest: Osiris Kiadó, 2006. ->ISBN

Middle English

Noun

house

  1. Alternative form of hous

Norwegian Bokmål

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Etymology

From English house, house music

Noun

house m (indeclinable) (uncountable)

  1. house music, house

Synonyms

References


Norwegian Nynorsk

Noun

house m

  1. house music, house

Polish

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Etymology

From English house music.

Pronunciation

Noun

house m inan

  1. house, house music
Declension

Derived terms

Further reading

  • house in Wielki s?ownik j?zyka polskiego, Instytut J?zyka Polskiego PAN
  • house in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese

Etymology

From English house music

Noun

house m

  1. house music, house

Synonyms


Spanish

Etymology

From English house music

Pronunciation

IPA(key): /xaus/, [xau?s]

Noun

house m (uncountable)

  1. house music, house

Swedish

Etymology

From English house music

Noun

house c

  1. house music, house

Declension

Declension of house 
Uncountable
Indefinite Definite
Nominative house housen
Genitive houses housens

Synonyms


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house
 



 



 
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