Herb
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Herb
See also: Herb, h?rb, and herb.

English

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology

From Middle English erbe, borrowed from Old French erbe (French herbe), from Latin herba. Initial h was restored to the spelling in the 15th century on the basis on Latin, but it remained mute until the 19th century and still is for many speakers.

Pronunciation

  • (UK, General Australian, General New Zealand) enPR: hû(r)b, IPA(key): /h?:b/
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  • (US, Canada) enPR: (h)ûrb, IPA(key): /(h)?b/
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  • North American pronunciation of the word varies; some speakers include the h-sound and others omit it, with the h-less pronunciation being the more common. Individual speakers are usually consistent in their choice, but the choice does not appear to be correlated with any regional, socioeconomic, or educational distinctions.
  • Outside of North America, the h-less pronunciation is restricted to speakers who have a general tendency to "drop the h" in all words.
  • Rhymes: -?:(?)b
  • Homophone: Herb (for the pronunciation /h?:(?)b/)

Noun

herb (countable and uncountable, plural herbs)

  1. (countable) Any green, leafy plant, or parts thereof, used to flavour or season food.
  2. (countable) A plant whose roots, leaves or seeds, etc. are used in medicine.
    If any medicinal herbs used by witches were supposedly evil, then how come people from at least the past benefited from the healing properties of such herbs?
  3. (uncountable, slang, euphemistic) Marijuana.
  4. (countable, botany) A plant whose stem is not woody and does not persist beyond each growing season
  5. (uncountable, obsolete) Grass; herbage.

Synonyms

Hyponyms

Related terms

Translations

Anagrams


German

Etymology

From Middle High German hare, here (inflected harwe, herwe), implying an Old High German *haro, *hero, from Proto-Germanic *harwa- ("bitter"), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)ker- ("to cut off"). Probably rrelated to Old English hyrwan, ge-hierwan ("to mock, harass").[1]

Pronunciation

Adjective

herb (comparative herber, superlative am herbsten)

  1. (of food and drink, e.g. beer) slightly bitter or sharp to the taste, often in a pleasant way; tart (but not in the sense of "sour")
  2. (figurative, chiefly of events or deeds) harsh; hard

Declension

Derived terms

Further reading

  • herb in Duden online

References

  1. ^ Kroonen, Guus (2013) , "harwa", in Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Germanic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 11), Leiden, Boston: Brill, ->ISBN, page 213

Polish

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Etymology

From Middle High German erbe ("heritage"). Compare German Erbe.

Pronunciation

Noun

herb m inan

  1. (heraldry) coat of arms
  2. (heraldry) armigerous clan; cf. Polish heraldry

Declension

Descendants

  • Russian: ? (gerb)
  • Yiddish: ?(herb)

Zazaki

Alternative forms

Pronunciation

Noun

herb

  1. (dated) war

Synonyms


  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

herb
 



 



 
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