Faux
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Faux

English

Etymology

Borrowed from French faux. Doublet of false.

Pronunciation

Adjective

faux (not comparable)

  1. Fake or artificial
    • 2008, James Chandler, ?Maureen N. McLane, The Cambridge Companion to British Romantic Poetry
      He modernizes the faux-archaic "withouten wind, withouten tide" to the more pointed and concrete "without a breeze, without a tide."
    • 2012, Susan Crabtree, ?Peter Beudert, Scenic Art for the Theatre: History, Tools and Techniques (page 392)
      Because mahoganies yield a supple fine-grained wood, they are often used as veneer wood. With proper technique and graining tools, all ofthese variations can be produced in faux wood.
    • 2012, Annie Padden Jubb, ?David Jubb, LifeFood Recipe Book: Living on Life Force (page 196)
      Run grapes, either frozen, chilled, or room temperature, through your juicer for an incredible grape faux wine.

Synonyms

Antonyms

Derived terms

Translations


French

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From Old French fauz, faus from Latin falsus

Adjective

faux (feminine singular fausse, masculine plural faux, feminine plural fausses)

  1. false; untrue
  2. false; not real
Antonyms

Adverb

faux

  1. badly; inaccurately; untruly

Etymology 2

From Latin falx.

Noun

faux f (plural faux)

  1. scythe

See also

Etymology 3

From Old French fail, faus, from Latin fall?, fallis.

Verb

faux

  1. first-person singular present indicative of faillir
  2. second-person singular present indicative of faillir

See also

Further reading


Latin

Etymology

Unknown. Possibly related to Ancient Greek ? (kháos, "abyss, chasm").

Pronunciation

Noun

faux f (genitive faucis); third declension

  1. (anatomy) throat, gullet
  2. chasm

Inflection

Third declension, alternative accusative singular in -im, alternative ablative singular in -? and accusative plural in -?s.

  • This noun only appears in the plural with the exception of the ablative singular.

Derived terms

Descendants

References


Middle French

Adjective

faux m (feminine singular fauce, masculine plural faux, feminine plural fauces)

  1. Alternative form of faulx

Norman

Etymology 1

From Old French faulz, the plural of fault, ultimately from Latin falsus.

Adjective

faux m

  1. (Jersey) false
Derived terms

Etymology 2

From Latin falx, from Proto-Indo-European *dhalk-, *dhalg- ("a cutting tool").

Noun

faux f (plural faux)

  1. (Jersey) scythe

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