Every
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Every
See also: Every

English

Alternative forms

Etymology

From Middle English every, everich, eaver-euch, averiche, aver alche, ever ælche, from Old English ?fre ?l?, ?fre hwil?, ?fre ?ehwil? ("each and every"), equivalent to ever +‎ each and/or ever +‎ which.

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /'?v.(?.)?i/
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: eve?ry, ev?e?ry

Determiner

every

  1. All of a countable group (considered individually), without exception.
    Every person in the room stood and cheered.
    • 1892, Walter Besant, chapter III, in The Ivory Gate: A Novel, New York, N.Y.: Harper & Brothers, [...], OCLC 16832619:
      At half-past nine on this Saturday evening, the parlour of the Salutation Inn, High Holborn, contained most of its customary visitors. [...] In former days every tavern of repute kept such a room for its own select circle, a club, or society, of habitués, who met every evening, for a pipe and a cheerful glass.
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 5, in The Mirror and the Lamp:
      Here, in the transept and choir, where the service was being held, one was conscious every moment of an increasing brightness; colours glowing vividly beneath the circular chandeliers, and the rows of small lights on the choristers' desks flashed and sparkled in front of the boys' faces, deep linen collars, and red neckbands.
    • 2013 June 7, David Simpson, "Fantasy of navigation", in The Guardian Weekly, volume 188, number 26, page 36:
      Like most human activities, ballooning has sponsored heroes and hucksters and a good deal in between. For every dedicated scientist patiently recording atmospheric pressure and wind speed while shivering at high altitudes, there is a carnival barker with a bevy of pretty girls willing to dangle from a basket or parachute down to earth.
  2. Used with ordinal numbers to denote those items whose position is divisible by the corresponding cardinal number, or a portion of equal size to that set.
    Every third bead was red, and the rest were blue.  The sequence was thus red, blue, blue, red, blue, blue etc.
    Decimation originally meant the execution of every tenth soldier in a unit.

Synonyms

Antonyms

Derived terms

Descendants

  • Sranan Tongo: ibri

Translations

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

See also

Anagrams


Middle English

Adjective

every

  1. Alternative form of everich

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every
 



 



 
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