Door
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Door
See also: döör and door-

English

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology

From Middle English dore, dor, from Old English duru ("door"), dor ("gate"), from Proto-Germanic *durz, from Proto-Indo-European *d?w?r, from *d?wer- ("doorway, door, gate"). Cognate with Scots door ("door"), Saterland Frisian Doore ("door"), West Frisian doar ("door"), Dutch deur ("door"), German Low German Door, Döör ("door"), German Tür ("door"), Tor ("gate"), Danish and Norwegian dør ("door"), Icelandic dyr ("door"), Latin foris, Ancient Greek ? (thúra), Albanian derë pl. dyer, Central Kurdish (derge), derî, Persian (dar), Russian (dver?), Hindi (dv?r) / ?(dv?r), Armenian ? (du?), Irish doras, Lithuanian durys.

A door.
A wooden door

Pronunciation

Noun

door (plural doors)

  1. A portal of entry into a building, room, or vehicle, consisting of a rigid plane movable on a hinge. Doors are frequently made of wood or metal. May have a handle to help open and close, a latch to hold the door closed, and a lock that ensures the door cannot be opened without the key.
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 5, in The Mirror and the Lamp:
      Then everybody once more knelt, and soon the blessing was pronounced. The choir and the clergy trooped out slowly, [...] , down the nave to the western door. [...] At a seemingly immense distance the surpliced group stopped to say the last prayer.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 20, in The China Governess[1]:
      ‘No. I only opened the door a foot and put my head in. The street lamps shine into that room. I could see him. He was all right. Sleeping like a great grampus. Poor, poor chap.'
    I knocked on the vice president's door
  2. Any flap, etc. that opens like a door.
    the 24 doors in an Advent calendar
  3. (immigration) An entry point.
  4. (figuratively) A means of approach or access.
    Learning is the door to wisdom.
  5. (figuratively) A barrier.
    Keep a door on your anger.
  6. (computing, dated) A software mechanism by which a user can interact with a program running remotely on a bulletin board system. See BBS door.

Meronyms

Hyponyms

Derived terms

Related terms

Meronyms

Parts of doors (six panel)

Translations

See also

Verb

door (third-person singular simple present doors, present participle dooring, simple past and past participle doored)

  1. (transitive, cycling) To cause a collision by opening the door of a vehicle in front of an oncoming cyclist or pedestrian.

Anagrams


Dutch

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From Middle Dutch d?re, from Old Dutch thuro, from Proto-Germanic *þurhw.

Preposition

door

  1. through
    Hij schoot de bal door het raam.
    He kicked the ball through the window.
  2. across, around (within a certain space)
    Dolenthousiast rende het hondje door de kamer.
    Very enthusiastically the puppy ran around the room.
  3. because of, due to
    Door files kan ik niet op tijd komen.
    Because of traffic jams I'm unable to arrive on time.
  4. by, by means of
    Hij vermeed een confrontatie door de andere kant op te lopen.
    He avoided a confrontation by walking the other way.
Inflection
Synonyms

(because of):

Derived terms
Related terms
Descendants
  • Afrikaans: deur

Adverb

door

  1. through
  2. forward, on
    Ondanks slecht weer ging het feest toch door.
    Despite bad weather, the party went on anyway.
  3. (postpositional) through (implying motion)
    Ik rijd nu de stad door.
    I'm now driving through the city.
  4. (postpositional) across, around (within a certain space)
    Dolenthousiast rende het hondje de kamer door.
    Very enthusiastically the puppy ran around the room.
Derived terms
Descendants

Etymology 2

From Middle Dutch dôre. Cognate to German Tor. This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

Noun

door m (plural doren)

  1. (now Southern, archaic) fool, moron
    • (Can we date this quote by Frans de Cort and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      Past ook op uwe ooren / Beter dan de doren!
    Synonyms: dwaas, nar, zot
Related terms

Anagrams


Old Portuguese

Etymology

From Latin dolor ("pain"), dol?ris.

Pronunciation

Noun

door f (plural doores)

  1. pain
    • 13th century, Afonso X the wise, Cantigas de Santa Maria, E Codex, Cantiga 206:
      ? untou lle b? a chaga / ? perdeu Log a door. / ? poss el a sua mão. / ben firme en seu logar
      And anointed well the wound / and soon the pain was gone. / And put his hand / very firmly in its place.

Related terms

Descendants


Scots

Alternative forms

Etymology

From Middle English dore, dor, from Old English duru ("door"), dor ("gate"), from Proto-Germanic *durz, from Proto-Indo-European *d?w?r, from *d?wer- ("doorway, door, gate").

Pronunciation

Noun

door (plural doors)

  1. door

Further reading


Somali

Verb

door

  1. to choose

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