Dies
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Dies
See also: Dies, díes, and dies.

English

Pronunciation

Verb

dies

  1. Third-person singular simple present indicative form of die

Noun

dies

  1. plural of die (when used in the sense of a pattern)

Anagrams


Catalan

Pronunciation

Noun

dies

  1. plural of dia

German

Pronunciation

Pronoun

dies

  1. Alternative form of dieses

Usage notes

In the nominative and accusative neuter, the forms dieses and dies are in general interchangeable, but there is a tendency to prefer one or the other in the following situations:

  • In adjectival usage, dieses is generally preferred to dies. So dieses Haus ("this house") is more common than the also correct and synonymic dies Haus.
  • In substantival usage, dieses is used to refer to a previously used neuter noun:
Unser Unternehmen sollte das Gebäude verkaufen. Wir können dieses nicht mehr gebrauchen.
Our company should sell the building. We cannot make use of it anymore.
  • Dies is used to refer to a preceding context or phrase:
Unser Unternehmen sollte das Gebäude verkaufen. Dies würde uns viel Geld einbringen.
Our company should sell the building. This would earn us a lot of money.
Dies is also used to refer to something the speaker perceives with the senses (deixis):
Sieh dir dies mal an! - Have a look at this! (e.g. a newspaper article)
  • The above habits are mainly true of formal speech and writing. Colloquially, the shorter dies is often preferred, but the pronouns das and es are even more common.

Further reading

  • dies in Duden online

Latin

Etymology

Back-formed from the accusative diem (at a time when the vowel was still long), from Proto-Italic *dj?m, the accusative of *djous, from Proto-Indo-European *dy?ws ("heaven, sky"). The original nominative survives as *di?s in two fossilised phrases: m? di?s fidius (an interjection) and n? di?s tertius ("day before yesterday", literally "now (is) the third day"). The d in di?s is a puzzle with some suggesting dialect borrowing and others referring to an etymon *diyew- via Lindeman's Law. But note the possible Proto-Italic allophony between -CjV- and -CiV-, which may be the cause for this divergence (See WT:AITC).

Cognate with Ancient Greek (Z?n), Old Armenian (tiw, "daytime"), Old Irish día, Welsh dydd, Polish dzie?. English day (q.v.) is a false cognate. The Italic stem was also the source of Iovis, the genitive of Iuppiter and was generally interchangeable with it in earlier times, still shown by the analogical formation Di?spiter.

Pronunciation

Noun

di?s m or f (genitive di); fifth declension

  1. A day, particularly:
    1. A solar or sidereal day of about 24 hours, especially (historical) Roman dates reckoned from one midnight to the next.
      • 405 CE, Jerome, Vulgate Exodus.16.26:
        Sex di?bus colligite in di? autem septim? sabbatum est Domin? idcirc? n?n inveni?tur.
        Six days ye shall gather it; but on the seventh day, which is the Sabbath, in it there shall be none.
      • 1564, Elizabeth I of England, Queen Elizabeth's Latin Speech to the University, at the Conclusion of her Entertainment in St. Mary's Church 9:
        Haec tamen vulgaris sententia me aliquantulum recreavit, quae etsi non auferre, tamen minuere possit dolorem meum, quae quidem sententia haec est, Romam uno die non fuisse conditam.
        But this common saying has given me a certain amount of comfort - a saying which cannot take away, but can at least lessen, the grief that I feel; and the saying is, that Rome was not built in one day.
      ...ante diem III idus Ianuarias...
      ...the third day before the January ides [i.e., Jan. 11]...
    2. Daytime: a period of light between sunrise and sunset.
      ...prima diei hora...
      ...the first hour of day [i.e., prime]...
    3. (often in the feminine) A set day: a date, an appointment.

Usage notes

Dates in the Roman calendar were reckoned according to the calends (kalendae), the nones (n?nae), and the ides (?d?s). The calends of every month was its first day; the nones and ides of most months were their 5th and 13th days; and the nones and ides of the four original 31-day months--M?rtius, M?ius, Qu?nt?lis or I?lius, and Oct?ber--were two days later. January 1st was thus kalendae I?nu?riae or I?nu?ri?. The day preceding any of these three principal days was called its eve (pr?di?). January 12th was thus pr?di? ?d?s I?nu?ri?s or I?nu?ri? (pr. Id. Ian.). All other days of the month were expressed by counting inclusively forward to the next of these three principal days and, in early Latin, this was expressed in the ablative. January 11th was thus di? terti? ante ?d?s I?nu?ri?s or I?nu?ri? (iii Id. Ian.). By the time of classical Latin, however, the ante had moved to the beginning of the expression and it became an accusative absolute: ante diem tertium ?d?s I?nu?ri?s or I?nu?ri? (a.d. iii Id. Ian.).[1] In this form, the date functioned as a single indeclinable noun and could serve as the object of prepositions such as ex and in.[2]

Unlike most fifth-declension nouns, di?s is not exclusively feminine. It was typically masculine, particularly in the plural. It appears as a feminine noun when being personified as a goddess, in some specific dates, in reference to the passing of time, and occasionally in other contexts.

Declension

Fifth-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative di?s di?s
Genitive di di?rum
Dative di di?bus
Accusative diem di?s
Ablative di? di?bus
Vocative di?s di?s

Antonyms

Derived terms

Related terms

Descendants

References

  1. ^ The British Sundial Society, "Ante Diem Bis Sextum Kalendras Martii", 2016.
  2. ^ Beck, Charles, Latin Syntax, Chiefly from the German of C. G. Zumpt (1838), Boston: Charles C. Little & James Brown, p. 176.

Further reading

  • dies in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • dies in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • dies in Charles du Fresne du Cange's Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883-1887)
  • dies in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • a day's journey: iter unius diei or simply diei
    • to give some one a few days for reflection: paucorum dierum spatium ad deliberandum dare
    • in our time; in our days: his temporibus, nostra (hac) aetate, nostra memoria, his (not nostris) diebus
    • year by year; day by day: singulis annis, diebus
    • the intercalary year (month, day): annus (mensis, dies) intercalaris
    • when it is growing dusk; towards evening: die, caelo vesperascente
    • the day is already far advanced: multus dies or multa lux est
    • while it is still night, day: de nocte, de die
    • the succession of day and night: vicissitudines dierum noctiumque
    • night and day: noctes diesque, noctes et dies, et dies et noctes, dies noctesque, diem noctemque
    • from day to day: in dies (singulos)
    • to live from day to day: in diem vivere
    • every other day: alternis diebus
    • four successive days: quattuor dies continui
    • one or two days: unus et alter dies
    • one, two, several days had passed, intervened: dies unus, alter, plures intercesserant
    • to adjourn, delay: diem proferre (Att. 13. 14)
    • on the day after, which was September 5th: postridie qui fuit dies Non. Sept. (Nonarum Septembrium) (Att. 4. 1. 5)
    • to-day the 5th of September; tomorrow September the 5th: hodie qui est dies Non. Sept.; cras qui dies futurus est Non. Sept.
    • yesterday, to-day, tomorrow: dies hesternus, hodiernus, crastinus
    • to appoint a date for an interview: diem dicere colloquio
    • at the appointed time: ad diem constitutam
    • to live to see the day when..: diem videre, cum...
    • time will assuage his grief: dies dolorem mitigabit
    • to depart this life: mortem (diem supremum) obire
    • on one's last day: supremo vitae die
    • to put off from one day to another: diem ex die ducere, differre
    • the date: dies (fem. in this sense)
    • immorality is daily gaining ground: mores in dies magis labuntur (also with ad, e.g. ad mollitiem)
    • to keep, celebrate a festival: diem festum agere (of an individual)
    • to keep, celebrate a festival: diem festum celebrare (of a larger number)
    • to decree a public thanksgiving for fifteen days: supplicationem quindecim dierum decernere (Phil. 14. 14. 37)
    • to pass the whole day in discussion: dicendi mora diem extrahere, eximere, tollere
    • to summon some one to appear on a given day; to accuse a person: diem dicere alicui
    • to fix a day for the engagement: diem pugnae constituere (B. G. 3. 24)
  • dies in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • dies in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin
  • Sihler, Andrew L. (1995) New Comparative Grammar of Greek and Latin, Oxford, New York: Oxford University Press, ->ISBN

Latvian

Verb

dies

  1. 3rd person singular future indicative form of diet
  2. 3rd person plural future indicative form of diet

Middle Dutch

Adverb

dies

  1. therefore, because of that, for that reason

Conjunction

dies

  1. until
  2. because

Determiner

dies

  1. masculine/neuter genitive singular of die

Contraction

dies

  1. Contraction of die es.

Northern Sami

Determiner

dies

  1. locative singular of diet

Norwegian Bokmål

Verb

dies

  1. passive form of die

Papiamentu

Papiamentu cardinal numbers
 <  9 10 11  > 
    Cardinal : dies

Etymology

From Spanish diez and Portuguese dez and Kabuverdianu dés.

Numeral

dies

  1. ten (10)

Romansch

Etymology

From Vulgar Latin *dossum, from Latin dorsum. Compare French dos.

Noun

dies m

  1. (anatomy) back

Serbo-Croatian

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *d?n?s?

Adverb

dies (Cyrillic spelling ?)

  1. (Kajkavian) today

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