Corde
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Corde
See also: cordé

French

Alternative forms

Etymology

From Middle French corde, from Old French corde, borrowed from Latin chorda ("gut"), from Ancient Greek (khord?, "string of gut, cord").

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kd/
  • (file)

Noun

corde f (plural cordes)

  1. rope (general)
  2. (geometry) chord
  3. (music) chord (of a string instrument)
  4. chord (vocal chord)
  5. line (washing line, for hanging clothes to dry)

Derived terms

Verb

corde

  1. first-person singular present indicative of corder
  2. third-person singular present indicative of corder
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of corder
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of corder
  5. second-person singular imperative of corder

Further reading

Anagrams


Interlingua

Noun

corde (plural cordes)

  1. (anatomy) heart
  2. (figuratively) heart
  3. hearts (a suit of cards, ?)

Italian

Noun

corde f pl

  1. plural of corda

Anagrams


Latin

Noun

corde

  1. ablative singular of cor

Middle English

Alternative forms

Etymology

From Old French corde, from Latin chorda, from Ancient Greek (khordá), (khord?).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /'k?rd(?)/, /'k?:rd(?)/

Noun

corde (plural cordes)

  1. A long, thick length of fibre (often intertwined):
  2. One of the strings of a string instrument.
  3. A sinew or the muscular material one is made out of.
  4. A division of inherited property or goods.
  5. (rare) A nerve; a cable of bundled neurons.
  6. (rare) A method to torment captives using a cord.
  7. (rare) A whip made of multiple cords.

Descendants

  • English: cord
  • Scots: cord

References


Middle French

Etymology

From Old French corde.

Noun

corde f (plural cordes)

  1. rope

Descendants


Norman

Etymology

From Old French corde, borrowed from Latin chorda ("gut").

Noun

corde f (plural cordes)

  1. (Jersey) string, rope, line

Derived terms


Old French

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin chorda, from Ancient Greek (khord?).

Noun

corde f (oblique plural cordes, nominative singular corde, nominative plural cordes)

  1. rope

Descendants


Tarantino

Etymology

Compare Italian corda.

Noun

corde

  1. rope

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corde
 



 



 
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