Cog
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Cog
See also: COG

English

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

Cogwheel showing the teeth (cogs).

From Middle English cogge, from Old Norse [Term?] (compare Norwegian kugg ("cog"), Swedish kugg, kugge ("cog, tooth")), from Proto-Germanic *kugg? (compare Dutch kogge ("cogboat"), German Kock), from Proto-Indo-European *gug? ("hump, ball") (compare Lithuanian gugà ("pommel, hump, hill")), from *g?w- ("to bend, arch").

The meaning of "cog" in carpentry derives from association with a tooth on a cogwheel.

Noun

cog (plural cogs)

  1. A tooth on a gear.
  2. A gear; a cogwheel.
  3. An unimportant individual in a greater system.
    • 1976, Norman Denny (English translation), Victor Hugo (original French), Les Misérables
      'There are twenty-five of us, but they don't reckon I'm worth anything. I'm just a cog in the machine.'
    • 1988, David Mamet, Speed-the-Plow
      Your boss tells you "take initiative," you best guess right--and you do, then you get no credit. Day-in, ... smiling, smiling, just a cog.
  4. (carpentry) A projection or tenon at the end of a beam designed to fit into a matching opening of another piece of wood to form a joint.
  5. (mining) One of the rough pillars of stone or coal left to support the roof of a mine.
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

cog (third-person singular simple present cogs, present participle cogging, simple past and past participle cogged)

  1. To furnish with a cog or cogs.

Etymology 2

From Middle English cogge, from Middle Dutch kogge, cogghe (modern kogge), from Proto-Germanic *kugg? (compare German Kock ("cogboat"), Norwegian kugg ("cog (gear tooth)")), from Proto-Indo-European *gug? ("hump, ball") (compare Lithuanian gugà ("pommel, hump, hill")), from *g?w- ("to bend, arch"). See etymology 1 above.

Noun

cog (plural cogs)

  1. (historical) A ship of burden, or war with a round, bulky hull.
Translations

Etymology 3

Uncertain origin. Both verb and noun appear first in 1532.

Noun

cog (plural cogs)

  1. A trick or deception; a falsehood.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of William Watson to this entry?)
Translations

Verb

cog (third-person singular simple present cogs, present participle cogging, simple past and past participle cogged)

  1. To load (a die) so that it can be used to cheat.
  2. To cheat; to play or gamble fraudulently.
    • (Can we date this quote by Jonathan Swift and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      For guineas in other men's breeches, / Your gamesters will palm and will cog.
  3. To seduce, or draw away, by adulation, artifice, or falsehood; to wheedle; to cozen; to cheat.
    • (Can we date this quote by Shakespeare and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      I'll [...] cog their hearts from them.
  4. To obtrude or thrust in, by falsehood or deception; to palm off.
    to cog in a word
    • (Can we date this quote by J. Dennis and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      Fustian tragedies [...] have, by concerted applauses, been cogged upon the town for masterpieces.
Translations

Etymology 4

From Old English cogge.

Alternative forms

Noun

cog (plural cogs)

  1. A small fishing boat.
  2. Alternative form of cogue ("wooden vessel for milk")

Anagrams


Irish

Etymology

Back-formation from cogadh ("war").

Verb

cog (present analytic cogann, future analytic cogfaidh, verbal noun cogadh, past participle cogtha)

  1. (rare or archaic) to war, wage war

Conjugation

Mutation

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
cog chog gcog
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading


Middle English

Noun

cog

  1. a ship of burden, or war with a round, bulky hull

Scottish Gaelic

Etymology

Back-formation from cogadh ("war, fighting").

Verb

cog (past chog, future cogaidh, verbal noun cogadh, past participle cogte)

  1. fight

Welsh

Pronunciation

Noun

cog f (plural cogau)

  1. cuckoo

Usage notes

  • Cog is usually found preceded by the definite article, y gog.

Synonyms

Mutation

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
cog gog nghog chog
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

cog
 



 



 
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