Bone
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Bone
See also: Bone, boné, bóne, bône, and Bône

English

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Wikipedia

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From Middle English bon, from Old English b?n ("bone, tusk; the bone of a limb"), from Proto-Germanic *bain? ("bone"), from *bainaz ("straight"), from Proto-Indo-European *b?eyh?- ("to hit, strike, beat").

Cognate with Scots bane, been, bean, bein, bain ("bone"), North Frisian bien ("bone"), West Frisian bien ("bone"), Dutch been ("bone; leg"), German Low German Been, Bein ("bone"), German Bein ("leg"), German Gebein ("bones"), Swedish ben ("bone; leg"), Norwegian and Icelandic bein ("bone"), Breton benañ ("to cut, hew"), Latin perfin?s ("break through, break into pieces, shatter"), Avestan (byente, "they fight, hit"). Related also to Old Norse beinn ("straight, right, favourable, advantageous, convenient, friendly, fair, keen") (whence Middle English bain, bayne, bayn, beyn ("direct, prompt"), Scots bein, bien ("in good condition, pleasant, well-to-do, cosy, well-stocked, pleasant, keen")), Icelandic beinn ("straight, direct, hospitable"), Norwegian bein ("straight, direct, easy to deal with"). See bain, bein.

Alternative forms

Noun

An animal bone

bone (countable and uncountable, plural bones)

  1. (uncountable) A composite material consisting largely of calcium phosphate and collagen and making up the skeleton of most vertebrates.
    • a1420, The British Museum Additional MS, 12,056, "Wounds complicated by the Dislocation of a Bone", in Robert von Fleischhacker, editor, Lanfranc's "Science of cirurgie."[1], London: K. Paul, Trench, Trübner & Co, translation of original by Lanfranc of Milan, published 1894, ->ISBN, page 63:
      Ne take noon hede to brynge togidere þe parties of þe boon þat is to-broken or dislocate, til viij. daies ben goon in þe wyntir, & v. in þe somer; for þanne it schal make quytture, and be sikir from swellynge; & þanne brynge togidere þe brynkis eiþer þe disiuncture after þe techynge þat schal be seid in þe chapitle of algebra.
  2. (countable) Any of the components of an endoskeleton, made of bone.
  3. A bone of a fish; a fishbone.
  4. A bonefish
    • 2019: "Tres Bocas" by Scott Sadil, California Fly Fisher
      The reason I rarely fish for Mag Bay bones with a 5-weight or 6-weight is the number of fish that can turn light stuff inside out.
  5. One of the rigid parts of a corset that forms its frame, the boning, originally made of whalebone.
  6. One of the fragments of bone held between the fingers of the hand and rattled together to keep time to music.
  7. Anything made of bone, such as a bobbin for weaving bone lace.
  8. (figuratively) The framework of anything.
  9. An off-white colour, like the colour of bone.
    bone colour:  
  10. (US, informal) A dollar.
  11. (American football, informal) The wishbone formation.
  12. (slang) An erect penis; a boner.
  13. (slang, chiefly in the plural) A domino or dice.
Synonyms
  • (rigid parts of a corset): rib, stay
Translations
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Adjective

bone (not comparable)

  1. Of an off-white colour, like the colour of bone.

Verb

bone (third-person singular simple present bones, present participle boning, simple past and past participle boned)

  1. To prepare (meat, etc) by removing the bone or bones from.
    • 1949, Kenneth Lewis Roberts, I Wanted to Write[2], page 44:
      One of the fish stalls specialized in boning shad, and he who has never eaten a boned shad baked twenty minutes on a hot oak plank has been deprived of the most delicious morsel that the ocean yields.
    • 1977, Prosper Montagné, Charlotte Snyder Turgeon, The New Larousse Gastronomique[3], page 73:
      The ballottine is made of a piece of meat, fowl, game or fish which is boned, stuffed, and rolled into the shape of a bundle. The term ballottine should strictly apply only to meat, boned and rolled, but not stuffed.
    • 2009, Maguelonne Toussaint-Samat, A History of Food[4], page 379:
      Then it is boned; keeping the bone in during cooking improves the flavour and enriches the meat with calcium.
    • 2011, Aliza Green, Steve Legato, The Fishmonger's Apprentice[5], page 38:
      Other fish suited to boning through the back include small bluefish, Arctic char, steelhead salmon, salmon, small wild striped bass, hybrid striped bass, Whitefish, drum, trout, and sea trout.
  2. To fertilize with bone.
    • 1859 July 9, The Economist[6], page 758:
      He cites an instance of land heavily boned 70 years ago as "still markedly luxuriant beyond any other grass land in the same district."
  3. To put whalebone into.
    to bone stays
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Ash to this entry?)
  4. (civil engineering) To make level, using a particular procedure; to survey a level line.
  5. (vulgar, slang, usually of a man) To have sexual intercourse with.
    • 2007, James Arnold Taylor as The Jew Producer, The Elimination Special, Part II: The Elimination (Drawn Together), season 3, episode 14, written by Stacey Deddo, Comedy Central:
      When we return we'll find out which one of our six remaining contestants' dreams will be totally ruined, like your mom's reputation after I bone her face.
    • 2007, Mary Birdsong as Deputy Cherisha Kimball, Reno Mounties (Reno 911!), season 4, episode 11, Comedy Central:
      I swear on the good book that if you pull through, I will bone Travis Junior.
    • 2006, Masta Ace (lyrics), "Sick of it all", in Pariah:
      I am sick of rappers claiming they hot when they really not
      I am sick of rappers bragging about shit they ain't really got
      These cats stay rapping about cars they don't own
      I am sick of rappers bragging about models they don't bone.
  6. (Australia, dated, in Aboriginal culture) To perform "bone pointing", a ritual that is intended to bring illness or even death to the victim.
    • 1962, Arthur Upfield, The Will of the Tribe, Collier Books, page 48:
      "You don't know!", Bony echoed. "You can tell me who boned me fifteen years ago on the other side of the world, and you can't tell me who killed the white-fella in the Crater".
  7. (usually with "up") To study.
    • 1896, Burt L. Standish, Frank Merriwell's Chums:
      "I know it. You do not study." "What's the use of boning all the time! I wasn't cut out for it."
  8. To polish boots to a shiny finish.
    • c. 1980,, F. van Zy, SADF National Service (1979-1980)[7]:
      "...the permanent boning (excessive polishing) of boots by recruits"
Synonyms
Translations

Derived terms

See also

Further reading

Etymology 2

Origin unknown; probably related in some way to Etymology 1, above.

Verb

bone (third-person singular simple present bones, present participle boning, simple past and past participle boned)

  1. (transitive, slang) To apprehend, steal.
    • 1839, Charles Dickens, Nicholas Nickleby[8], page 127:
      "Did I?" said Squeers, "Well it was rather a startling thing for a stranger to come and recommend himself by saying that he knew all about you, and what your name was, and why you were living so quiet here, and what you had boned, and who you had boned it from."
    • 1915, William Roscoe Thayer, The Life and Letters of John Hay:
      [...] as long as you and I live I take it for granted that you will not suspect me of boning them. But to guard against casualties hereafter, I have asked Nicolay to write you a line saying that I have never had in my possession or custody any of the papers which you entrusted to him.
    • 1936, J.R.R. Tolkien, "The Root of the Boot", in Songs for the Philologists:
      But troll's old seat is much the same,
      And the bone he boned from its owner
    • 1942, Rebecca West, Black Lamb and Grey Falcon, Canongate, published 2006, page 802:
      Therefore she wants to take results that belong to other people: she wants to bone everybody else's loaf.

Etymology 3

Borrowed from French bornoyer to look at with one eye, to sight, from borgne one-eyed.

Verb

bone (third-person singular simple present bones, present participle boning, simple past and past participle boned)

  1. (carpentry, masonry, surveying) To sight along an object or set of objects to check whether they are level or in line.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Knight to this entry?)
    • 1846, W. M. Buchanan, A Technological Dictionary[9], page 151:
      Joiners, &c., bone their work with two straight edges.

Etymology 4

Clipping of trombone

Noun

bone (plural bones)

  1. (slang) Clipping of trombone.

Anagrams


Afrikaans

Noun

bone

  1. plural of boon

Esperanto

Etymology

From bona ("good") +‎ -e.

Pronunciation

Adverb

bone

  1. well, OK

Hadza

Pronunciation

Etymology

Borrowed from Sukuma ne ("four (class XIV)").

Alternative forms

Adjective

bone m (masc. plural bunibii, fem. boneko, fem. plural bonebee)

  1. four

Ido

Etymology

From Esperanto bone ("well"), bona ("good") +‎ -e.

Pronunciation

Adverb

bone

  1. well
    • 2008, Margrit Kennedy, Pekunio sen interesti ed inflaciono, tr. by Alfred Neussner of Interest and Inflation Free Money, page 50:
      To pruvas maxim bone nia bonstando, se ica sumo distributesus nur proxime pro-porcionale.
      This would have served well as a proof of our prosperity if it were evenly distributed. (Original English, page 29)

Related terms


Italian

Adjective

bone

  1. Feminine plural of adjective bono.

Latin

Adjective

bone

  1. vocative masculine singular of bonus

References


Lindu

Noun

bone

  1. sand

Middle Dutch

Etymology

From Old Dutch *b?na, from Proto-Germanic *baun?.

Noun

bône f

  1. bean

Inflection

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants

  • Dutch: boon
    • Afrikaans: boon
    • -> Papiamentu: bonchi(from the diminutive)
    • -> Sranan Tongo: bonki(from the diminutive)
  • Limburgish: boean

Further reading

  • "bone", in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000

Verwijs, E.; Verdam, J. (1885-1929), "bone", in Middelniederlandsch Woordenboek, The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff, ->ISBN


Middle English

Etymology 1

From Old English b?n.

Noun

bone (plural bones)

  1. Alternative form of bon

Etymology 2

From Old Norse bón.

Noun

bone

  1. Alternative form of boon

Northern Sami

Pronunciation

  • (Kautokeino) IPA(key): /'pone/

Verb

bone

  1. inflection of botnit:
    1. present indicative connegative
    2. second-person singular imperative
    3. imperative connegative

Old French

Pronunciation

Adjective

bone

  1. nominative feminine singular of bon
  2. oblique feminine singular of bon

Venetian

Adjective

bone

  1. feminine plural of bon

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bone
 



 



 
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