Bale
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Bale
See also: Bale, ?ale, bále, Bâle, balé, balê, balë, ba-lê, and Ba Lê

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bel/, ['be(?)?], [be]
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -e?l
  • Homophone: bail

Etymology 1

From Middle English bale ("evil"), Old English bealo, from Proto-Germanic *balw?. Cognate with Low German bal- ("bad, ill"), Gothic (balweins, "torture"), Old High German balo ("destruction"), Old Norse b?l ("disaster").

Noun

bale (uncountable)

  1. Evil, especially considered as an active force for destruction or death.
  2. Suffering, woe, torment.
    • 1596, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, VI.7:
      That other swayne, like ashes deadly pale, / Lay in the lap of death, rewing his wretched bale.
    • c. 1608, William Shakespeare, Coriolanus (Act I, Scene 1):
      "Rome and her rats are at the point of battle; / The one side must have bale."

Derived terms

Etymology 2

From Middle English bale ("pyre, funeral pyre"), from Old English b?l ("pyre, funeral pyre"), from Proto-Germanic *b?l? ("pyre"), from Proto-Indo-European *b?el- ("to shine; gleam; sparkle"). Cognate with Old Norse bál (which may have been the direct source for the English word).

Noun

bale (plural bales)

  1. (obsolete) A large fire, a conflagration or bonfire.
  2. (archaic) A funeral pyre.
  3. (archaic) A beacon-fire.

Derived terms

Etymology 3

From Middle English bale ("bale"), from Old French bale and Medieval Latin bala, of Germanic origin. Doublet of ball.

Round straw bales in Germany

Noun

bale (plural bales)

  1. A rounded bundle or package of goods in a cloth cover, and corded for storage or transportation.
    • 1885, Richard F. Burton, The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Night 563:
      So having made up my mind, I packed up in bales a quantity of precious stuffs suited for sea-trade and repaired with them from Baghdad-city to Bassorah-town, where I found ship ready for sea, and in her a company of considerable merchants.
  2. A bundle of compressed wool or hay, compacted for shipping and handling.
  3. A measurement of hay equal to 10 flakes. Approximately 70-90 lbs (32-41 kg).
  4. A measurement of paper equal to 10 reams.

Coordinate terms

Derived terms

Translations

See also

Verb

bale (third-person singular simple present bales, present participle baling, simple past and past participle baled)

  1. (transitive) To wrap into a bale.

Translations

Etymology 4

Alternative spelling of bail.

Verb

bale (third-person singular simple present bales, present participle baling, simple past and past participle baled)

  1. (Britain, nautical) To remove water from a boat with buckets etc.

Translations

See also

Anagrams


Buginese

Noun

bale

  1. fish

Dutch

Pronunciation

Verb

bale

  1. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of balen

Anagrams


French

Alternative forms

Etymology

From Gaulish *balu.

Pronunciation

Noun

bale f (uncountable)

  1. chaff (inedible casing of a grain seed)

Haitian Creole

Etymology

From French balai.

Pronunciation

Noun

bale

  1. broom

Verb

bale

  1. to sweep

Kapampangan

Etymology

From Proto-Philippine *balay, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *balay, from Proto-Austronesian *balay.

Noun

balé

  1. house

Middle English

Etymology 1

From Old English bealo, from Proto-Germanic *balw?.

Alternative forms

Pronunciation

Noun

bale (plural bales)

  1. An evil or wrong act; a bad deed.
  2. Maliciousness, iniquity, damage.
  3. Devastation and doom; the causing of lifelessness.
  4. Woe or torment; hurting, agony.
Related terms
Descendants
  • English: bale(dated)
References

Adjective

bale

  1. decisive, ruinous, vicious
  2. tormentuous, painful, hurtful
References

Etymology 2

Either from Old English b?l, Old Norse bál, or a conflation of both; in any case, from Proto-Germanic *b?l?.

Pronunciation

Noun

bale

  1. Any large fire; a bonfire or pyre.
  2. A fire for inhumation; a funeral pyre.
  3. A fire for execution or killing.
Related terms
Descendants
References

Etymology 3

Probably from Old French bale, balle, from Medieval Latin balla, from Frankish or Old High German balla ("ball"), from Proto-Germanic *balluz.

Alternative forms

Pronunciation

Noun

bale (plural bales)

  1. A bale (rounded bundle)
Descendants
References

Norwegian Nynorsk

Verb

bale (present tense balar, past tense bala, past participle bala, passive infinitive balast, present participle balande, imperative bal)

  1. Alternative form of bala

Portuguese

Pronunciation

Verb

bale

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of balar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of balar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of balar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of balar
  5. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present indicative of balir
  6. second-person singular (tu, sometimes used with você) affirmative imperative of balir

Romanian

Etymology

From Vulgar Latin root *baba. Compare French bave, Italian bava, Spanish and Portuguese baba. The normal result, *ba, is not used as the singular has been replaced with bal? through analogy.

Noun

bale f pl (plural only)

  1. slobber, drool, dribble, saliva

Declension

Synonyms

Derived terms


Spanish

Verb

bale

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of balar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of balar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of balar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of balar.

Turkish

Etymology

Borrowed from French ballet.

Noun

bale (definite accusative baleyi, plural baleler)

  1. ballet

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