Animal
Get Animal essential facts below. View Videos or join the Animal discussion. Add Animal to your PopFlock.com topic list for future reference or share this resource on social media.
Animal
See also: Animal and animâl

English

English Wikipedia has articles on:
Wikipedia
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) enPR: ?n'?m?l, IPA(key): /'æn?m?l/
  • (file)

Etymology 1

From Middle English animal, from Old French animal, from Latin animal, a nominal use of an adjective from animale, neuter of anim?lis, from anima ("breath, spirit"). Displaced native Middle English deor, der ("animal") (from Old English d?or ("animal")), Middle English reother ("animal, neat") (from Old English hr?þer, hr?þer ("neat, ox")).

Noun

animal (plural animals)

  1. In scientific usage, a multicellular organism that is usually mobile, whose cells are not encased in a rigid cell wall (distinguishing it from plants and fungi) and which derives energy solely from the consumption of other organisms (distinguishing it from plants).
    A cat is an animal, not a plant. Humans are also animals, under the scientific definition, as we are not plants.
    Synonyms: beast, creature
  2. In non-scientific usage, any member of the kingdom Animalia other than a human.
    Synonym: beast
  3. In non-scientific usage, any land-living vertebrate (i.e. not fishes, insects, etc.).
    • 2013 July-August, Henry Petroski, "Geothermal Energy", in American Scientist, volume 101, number 4:
      Ancient nomads, wishing to ward off the evening chill and enjoy a meal around a campfire, had to collect wood and then spend time and effort coaxing the heat of friction out from between sticks to kindle a flame. With more settled people, animals were harnessed to capstans or caged in treadmills to turn grist into meal.
  4. (figuratively) A person who behaves wildly; a bestial, brutal, brutish, cruel, or inhuman person.
    My students are animals.
    Synonyms: brute, monster, savage
  5. (informal) A person of a particular type.
    He's a political animal.
  6. Matter, thing.
    a whole different animal
Hyponyms
Related terms
Translations

See animal/translations § Noun.

Etymology 2

From Latin anim?lis, from either anima ("breath, spirit") or animus. Originally distinct from the noun, it became associated with attributive use of the noun and is now indistinguishable from it.

Adjective

animal (not comparable)

  1. Of or relating to animals.
    animal instincts
    Synonyms: beastly, bestial
  2. Raw, base, unhindered by social codes.
    animal passions
    Synonyms: animalistic, beastly, bestial, untamed, wild
  3. Pertaining to the spirit or soul; relating to sensation or innervation.
    • 2003, Roy Porter, Flesh in the Age of Reason (Penguin 2004), page 47:
      To explain what activated the flesh, 'animal spirits' were posited, superfine fluids which shuttled between the mind and the vitals, conveying messages and motion.
  4. (slang, Ireland) Excellent
Derived terms
Translations

See also

References

  • animal at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams


Asturian

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin animal.

Adjective

animal (epicene, plural animales)

  1. animal

Noun

animal m (plural animales)

  1. animal

Catalan

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin animal.

Pronunciation

Adjective

animal (masculine and feminine plural animals)

  1. animal

Noun

animal m (plural animals)

  1. animal

Derived terms


Cebuano

Etymology 1

From English animal, from Middle English animal, from Old French animal, from Latin animal, a nominal use of an adjective from animale, neuter of anim?lis, from anima ("breath, spirit").

Noun

animal

  1. animal
  2. (derogatory) a contemptible person
  3. (sometimes humurous), a crazy person

Adjective

animal

  1. (sometimes humurous), crazy
  2. contemptible, deserving contempt
  3. ruthless; without pity or compassion; cruel, pitiless

Etymology 2

From Spanish animal, from Latin animal.

Interjection

animal

  1. (vulgar) used as an expression of disgust, anger, etc.

French

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin animal. Compare the archaic inherited doublet aumaille and its variant armaille, both from the Latin neuter plural anim?lia.

Pronunciation

Noun

animal m (plural animaux)

  1. animal
    Synonyms: bête, bestiole

Derived terms

Adjective

animal (feminine singular animale, masculine plural animaux, feminine plural animales)

  1. animal
    Synonym: bestial
    Antonym: végétal

Further reading

Anagrams


Galician

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin animal.

Adjective

animal m or f (plural animais)

  1. animal

Noun

animal m (plural animais)

  1. animal

Haitian Creole

Etymology

From French animal, from Latin animal.

Noun

animal

  1. animal
    Synonym: zannimo

Interlingua

Pronunciation

Noun

animal (plural animales)

  1. animal

Kabuverdianu

Etymology

From Portuguese animal.

Noun

animal

  1. beast
  2. animal

Latin

Etymology

From anim?le, nominative neuter singular of anim?lis.

Pronunciation

Noun

animal n (genitive anim?lis); third declension

  1. animal
  2. living creature

Declension

Third-declension noun (neuter, "pure" i-stem).

Synonyms

Related terms

Descendants

References


Middle English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ani'ma:l/, /a'nimal/

Etymology 1

Borrowed from Old French animal, from Latin animal.

Alternative forms

Noun

animal (plural animales)

  1. An animal (considered to include humans)
Descendants
References

Etymology 2

Borrowed from Latin anim?lis.

Alternative forms

Adjective

animal

  1. Related to the soul or spirit of a living being (i.e. sentience or sapience)
Descendants
References

Middle French

Noun

animal m (plural animaux or animaulx)

  1. animal
    Synonym: beste

Papiamentu

Etymology

From Portuguese animal and Spanish animal.

Noun

animal

  1. beast
  2. animal

Portuguese

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin animal. See also alimária, an inherited doublet.

Pronunciation

Adjective

animal m or f (plural animais, comparable)

  1. (biology) animal (relating to animals)
  2. (Brazil, slang) cool; awesome

Inflection

Quotations

For quotations of use of this term, see Citations:animal.

Noun

animal m (plural animais)|animais

  1. (biology) animal (any member of the kingdom Animalia)
  2. (non-scientific usage) animal (an animal other than a human, especially a vertebrate)
    Synonyms: besta, bicho
  3. (colloquial) twat; idiot; moron
    Synonym: idiota
  4. (colloquial) beast (a cruel person)
    Synonym: monstro

Quotations

For quotations of use of this term, see Citations:animal.

Derived terms


Romanian

Etymology

Borrowed from French animal, from Latin animal. Doublet of n?maie.

Pronunciation

Adjective

animal m or n (feminine singular animal?, masculine plural animali, feminine and neuter plural animale)

  1. animal, animalistic
  2. brutal

Declension

Adverb

animal

  1. brutally

Noun

animal n (plural animale)

  1. animal

Declension


Romansch

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin animal.

Noun

animal m (plural animals)

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Sutsilvan, Surmiran, Vallader) animal

Synonyms


Spanish

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin animal. See also alimaña, an inherited doublet.

Pronunciation

Adjective

animal (plural animales)

  1. animal

Noun

animal m (plural animales)

  1. animal

Derived terms

Related terms

Anagrams

Further reading


Tok Pisin

Etymology

From English animal.

Noun

animal

  1. animal (members of Kingdom Animalia that are not humans)
    • 1989, Buk Baibel long Tok Pisin, Port Moresby: Bible Society of Papua New Guinea, 1:25:
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
    Synonym: abus
This entry has fewer than three known examples of actual usage, the minimum considered necessary for clear attestation, and may not be reliable. Tok Pisin is subject to a special exemption for languages with limited documentation. If you speak it, please consider editing this entry or adding citations. See also Help and the Community Portal.

  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

animal
 



 



 
Music Scenes