Alphabet
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Alphabet
See also: Alphabet

English

Etymology

From Middle English alphabete, borrowed from Late Latin alphab?tum, from Ancient Greek (alpháb?tos), from ? (álpha) and ? (bêta), the names of the first two letters of the Greek alphabet, ? (A) and ? (B), lowercase forms ? and ?. The Greek names derived from aleph, the name of the Phoenician letter ?(?, "ox") and beth, the name of the letter ?(b, "house"), so called because they were pictograms of those objects, having developed from the Egyptian hieroglyphs
F1
(?) and
pr
(?).

Doublet of alfabeto.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /'æl.f?.b?t/
  • (uncommon) IPA(key): /'æl.f?.b?t/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: al?pha?bet

Noun

alphabet (plural alphabets)

  1. The set of letters used when writing in a language.
    The Greek alphabet has only twenty-four letters.
    In the first year of school, pupils are taught to recite the alphabet.
  2. A writing system in which letters represent phonemes. (Contrast e.g. logography, a writing system in which each character represents a word, and syllabary, in which each character represents a syllable.)
    1. A writing system in which there are letters for the consonant and vowel phonemes. (Contrast e.g. abjad.)
  3. (computer science) A typically finite set of distinguishable symbols.
    Let be a regular language over the alphabet .
  4. (India, Hong Kong, Singapore) An individual letter of an alphabet; an alphabetic character.
    • 2002, Eugene E. Dike, African myth of creation in African form of writing, Monsenstein und Vannerdat, ->ISBN, page 30:
      We realize the fact that the alphabet A has been used in many world scripts as a vowel with the others AEIOU.
    • 2005, Satinder Bal Gupta, Comprehensive Discrete Mathematics & Structures, Laxmi Publications, page 237:
      There are 26 alphabets in English.
  5. The simplest rudiments; elements.
    • 1828, Thomas Babington Macaulay, "The Constitutional History of England: From the Accession of Henry VII, to the Death of George II, by Henry Hallam", in The Edinburgh Review, volume 18:
      The very alphabet of our law.

Synonyms

Derived terms

Translations

See also

Verb

alphabet (third-person singular simple present alphabets, present participle alphabeting, simple past and past participle alphabeted)

  1. (rare) To designate by the letters of the alphabet; to arrange alphabetically.

Synonyms

Further reading


French

Etymology

From Late Latin alphab?tum, from Ancient Greek (alpháb?tos), from ? (álpha) (?,?) and ? (bêta) (?,?) (the first two letters of the Greek alphabet), from Phoenician aleph(aleph) ?(?, "ox") and beth ?(b, "house"), so called because they were pictograms of those objects, having developed from the Egyptian hieroglyphs
F1
(?) and
pr
(?).

Pronunciation

Noun

alphabet m (plural alphabets)

  1. alphabet (set of letters considered as a group)

Related terms

Further reading


Middle French

Etymology

From Late Latin alphab?tum, from Ancient Greek (alpháb?tos), from ? (álpha) (?,?) and ? (bêta) (?,?) (the first two letters of the Greek alphabet), from Phoenician aleph(aleph) ?(?, "ox") and beth ?(b, "house"), so called because they were pictograms of those objects, having developed from the Egyptian hieroglyphs
F1
(?) and
pr
(?).

Noun

alphabet m (plural alphabets)

  1. alphabet (set of letters considered as a group)

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alphabet
 



 



 
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