-se
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-se

English

Pronunciation

Etymology

From Middle English -sen (verbal ending), from Old English -sian (verbal ending), from Proto-Germanic *-is?n?.

Suffix

-se

  1. Creates denominatives from adjective or nouns.
  2. When attached to certain adjectives, it forms a transitive verb whose meaning is, to make (adjective). The same construction could also be done to certain (fewer) nouns, as, bless, in which case the verb means roughly, to make bloody/sanctify.
Usage notes
  • No longer productive.

Derived terms

verbal suffix

Anagrams


Chuukese

Suffix

-se

  1. (auxiliary) Negative simple present and past tense aspect marker.

Dutch

Etymology

From the inflected form of the suffix -s, denoting characteristic.

Pronunciation

  • (file)

Suffix

-se f (plural -sen)

  1. Suffix denoting a female inhabitant of a place.

Antonyms


Irish

Alternative forms

  • -sa (broad form)

Pronunciation

Suffix

-se

  1. Alternative form of -sa (used after palatalized consonants and front vowels:)

Derived terms



Latin

Suffix

-se

  1. vocative masculine singular of -sus

Ligurian

Etymology

From Latin s?.

Pronunciation

Suffix

-se

  1. Appended to present infinitive verb forms to derive reflexive forms
    ciamâ ("to call") + ‎-se -> ‎ciamâse ("to call oneself; to be called")

Derived terms



Old Irish

Suffix

-se

  1. Alternative form of -sa (used after slender consonants and front vowels)

See also


Scottish Gaelic

Suffix

-se

  1. -self, -selves (emphatic)

Usage notes

Derived terms


See also


  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

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